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Arterial blood pressure therapy

Giuseppe Santarpino, Lazlo Gazdag, Joachim Sirch, Ferdinand Vogt, Miroslaw Ledwon, Theodor Fischlein, Steffen Pfeiffer
Bilateral internal thoracic artery (BITA) grafting may be associated with a higher risk of postoperative deep sternal wound infection than monolateral internal thoracic artery grafting due to a limited blood supply to the thoracic chest wall. Because preliminary studies suggest negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) may reduce the risk of infection, a retrospective chart review of 129 patients who underwent BITA between February 2003 and October 2014 was conducted. Of those, 21 patients received NPWT for 5 days immediately following surgery and the incisions of 108 patients were covered with a conventional gauze dressing...
December 2015: Ostomy/wound Management
Victoria A McCredie, Simone Piva, Marlene Santos, Wei Xiong, Airton Leonardo de Oliveira Manoel, Andrea Rigamonti, Gregory M T Hare, Martin G Chapman, Andrew J Baker
BACKGROUND: There are a range of opinions on the benefits and thresholds for the transfusion of red blood cells in critically ill patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and an urgent need to understand the neurophysiologic effects. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of red blood cell transfusions on cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2) in critically ill TBI patients. METHODS: This prospective observational study enrolled consecutive TBI patients with anemia requiring transfusion...
October 18, 2016: Neurocritical Care
S J van Rooijen, D Huisman, M Stuijvenberg, J Stens, R M H Roumen, F Daams, G D Slooter
BACKGROUND: Colorectal anastomotic leakage (CAL) is a major surgical complication in intestinal surgery. Despite many optimizations in patient care, the incidence of CAL is stable (3-19%) [1]. Previous research mainly focused on determining patient and surgery related risk factors. Intraoperative non-surgery related risk factors for anastomotic healing also contribute to surgical outcome. This review offers an overview of potential modifiable risk factors that may play a role during the operation...
October 15, 2016: International Journal of Surgery
Junichiro Hashimoto
Arterial structure and function change progressively with advancing age. Owing to long-lasting repetitive stretch with intermittent cardiac contraction, elastic fibers in the tunica media of large arteries gradually degenerate and are replaced by collagenous fibers. Such medial degeneration causes elastic arteries to stiffen and dilate. However, the speed of the vascular aging varies considerably among individuals; a discrepancy often exists between the chronological age of an individual and the biological age of his or her arteries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Seong Hwan Kim
Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes at optimal dosing, of which one should be a diuretic. Accordingly, it is not synonymous with uncontrolled hypertension. Among a variety of risk factors, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a common type of sleep-disordered breathing, has been recognized a well-established risk factor for resistant hypertension. Indeed, both European and American guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension stated that OSA is a modifiable cause of resistant hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Michel E Safar
Mid-life elevated BP is classically associated with a raised systemic vascular resistance. A classical interpretation of the association between aortic stiffness and blood pressure (BP) invokes hypertension as a simple form of premature aging that increases stress on the arterial wall and accelerates age-related stiffening of the aorta. Recent clinical and experimental data have called into question the directionality of this sequence of events associating stiffness and hypertension.Therefore an initial abnormality in stiffness may antedate and contribute initially to the pathogenesis of hypertension, namely isolated systolic hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Gian Paolo Rossi
Primary aldosteronism (PA) involves more than 11% of patients referred to specialized hypertension centers and, therefore, is much more common than commonly held. Moreover, it causes a damage to the heart, blood vessels and kidneys, which translates into a high rate of cardiovascular events, in excess to the degree of blood pressure raise. Along with the notion that a timely diagnosis entails a fundamental step for the choice of an appropriate therapy, which can correct the arterial hypertension and the hypokalemia, this justifies efforts to search for PA in the majority of the patients with hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Donghoon Choi
: Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is an increasingly recognized medical problem especially in elderly patients. It commonly occurs with systemic manifestations including hypertension (HTN), chronic kidney disease (CKD) or atherosclerotic diseases including coronary or peripheral artery disease. Significant renal artery stenosis may result in HTN, ischemic nephropathy, however it is still in debate about the benefit of revascularization. Although several randomized controlled trials including Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) study has failed to reveal a significant benefit of angioplasty, angioplasty with medical therapy is increasingly accepted in some patients with certain clinical conditions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Lin Shi
According to the seventh report of Joint National Committee (JNC 7), hypertensive emergency (HE), a kind of hypertensive crisis, is defined as a sudden and abrupt elevation in blood pressure so as to cause acute target organ dysfunctions, including central nervous system, cardiovascular system or kidneys. Patients with HE require immediate reduction in markedly elevated blood pressure. Currently, there are no international guidelines for children HE, so the JNC definition is commonly used. Hypertensive emergency in children is rare but a life-threatening emergency...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Jun Oh
Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, coronary artery disease and kidney damage in adults and children. There is a paucity of data on the long-term sequelae of persistent hypertension in children, but it is already known that children with hypertension have evidence of end organ damage and are at risk of hypertension into adulthood. The prevalence of hypertension in children is rising, most likely due to a concurrent rise in obesity rates. In children with hypertension, non-pharmacological measures are often recommended as first-line therapy, but a significant proportion of children will eventually require pharmacological treatment to reduce blood pressure, especially those with evidence of end organ damage at presentation or during follow-up...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Oleg Mamontov, Mikhail Bogachev, Andrey Kozlenoc
OBJECTIVE: To assess the autonomic regulation in patients with various circadian blood pressure profile (CBPP) anomalies that persisted despite of combined antihypertensive therapy. DESIGN AND METHOD: We studied 114 hypertensives aged 56,8 ± 17,9 years receiving combined antihypertensive therapy divided into two groups, with adequate (n = 61) and inadequate (n = 53) CBPP. Groups were comparable in terms of age and number of drugs intake per day (2.8 ± 1...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
William C Cushman
Beginning with the Veterans Administration (VA) Cooperative Hypertension Study of the 1960 s, blood pressure (BP) lowering with antihypertensive medications has been shown to reduce major cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure (HF) and CV and all-cause mortality in randomized controlled CV outcome trials. Multiple drugs were usually required in these trials to lower BP in treated participants. Medication regimens in the early trials, including the VA trial, included a thiazide-type diuretic (TTD) as initial therapy...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kazuyuki Shimada
Stroke is known to frequently recur in patients with a history of cerebrovascular disease, and the control of hypertension is extremely important for the treatment of those patients. The robust relationship between the recurrent cerebrovascular disease and blood pressure control has been demonstrated in large-scale clinical studies. The antihypertensive drug therapy significantly reduces the recurrence rate of all types of cerebrovascular disease, incidences of myocardial infarction and all vascular events...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sekib Sokolovic, Samir Mehmedagic
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this paper was to present the effects of the vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) on a blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) in arterial hypertension patient. DESIGN AND METHOD: The pilot study (SPM-005) was designed to evaluate the eficiancy and safety profile of the neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways using the active implantable device for the vagus nerve stimulation in rheumatoid arthritis patient. We investigated the VNS on the BP and HR in 68 years old female patient with a long-standing arterial hypertension and the lisinopril and hydrochlorothiazide in a therapy...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Seungbum Kim, Gary Wang, Gilberto Lobaton, Eric Li, Tao Yang, Mohan Raizada
OBJECTIVE: Our previous studies have demonstrated that gut microbial dysbiosis is linked to high blood pressure in patients. This was associated with decreases in butyrate- and acetate- producing microbial populations. Thus, our objective in this study was to investigate the hypothesis that infusion of butyrate would impact dysbiosis, gut immunity and attenuate hypertension. DESIGN AND METHOD: C57B6 mice were divided into 4 groups; Saline infused, Angiotensin II (750ng/kg/min) infused, Ang II infused and butyrate treated (0...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Rhian M Touyz
Pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to hypertension include injury to small arteries, characterised by endothelial dysfunction, vascular remodeling, fibrosis and inflammation, (so called hypertensive vascular phenotype). These changes are initially adaptive but in the long term become maladaptive leading to vascular damage and loss of function, particularly important in small resistance arteries, critically involved in the regulation of peripheral vascular resistance and consequently in blood pressure control...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kohji Shirai
BACKGROUND: The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a new arterial stiffness index of the arterial tree from the origin of the aorta to the ankle, and was essentially derived from the stiffness parameterβtheory proposed by Hayashi. The conspicuous feature of CAVI is independency from blood pressure at the time of measurement. AIM: The purpose is to clarify the meaning of CAVI as a surrogate marker of arteriosclerosis, and also the role of CAVI in the blood pressure control system...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Folafoluwa O Odetola, Renee R Anspach, Yong Y Han, Sarah J Clark
PURPOSE: To investigate the decision making underlying transfer of children with respiratory failure from level II to level I pediatric intensive care unit care. METHODS: Interviews with 19 eligible level II pediatric intensive care unit physicians about a hypothetical scenario of a 2-year-old girl in respiratory failure: RESULTS: At baseline, indices critical to management were as follows: OI (53%), partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (Pao2)/Fio2 (32%), and inflation pressure (16%)...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Critical Care
Nadine Lilla, Jasmin Hartmann, Stefan Koehler, Ralf-Ingo Ernestus, Thomas Westermaier
A lack of nitric oxide (NO) may be a possible factor in the pathogenesis of an acute decrease of cerebral blood flow (CBF) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was conducted to investigate whether early therapy with an NO-donor can improve CBF and offer neuroprotection after experimental SAH in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to SAH by the endovascular filament model and treated with 1.5μg/kg/min of intravenous sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or vehicle (n=10) starting 15min after induction of SAH until 180min thereafter...
September 20, 2016: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Amelia Chiara Trombetta, Carmen Pizzorni, Barbara Ruaro, Sabrina Paolino, Alberto Sulli, Vanessa Smith, Maurizio Cutolo
OBJECTIVE: To quantify in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) the absolute nailfold capillary number/mm (the absolute number of capillaries, observable in the first row, in 1 mm per field) and fingertip blood perfusion (FBP) during longterm therapy with the endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan (BOSE) and the synthetic analog of prostacyclin PGI2 iloprost (ILO) by multiple diagnostic tools. Observed values were correlated with clinical outcomes. METHODS: Thirty patients with SSc already receiving intravenous ILO (80 μg/day) for 5 continuous days (every 3 mos) were recruited in the clinic...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Rheumatology
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