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Mario Novak, Vlasta Vyroubal, Željko Krnčević, Maja Petrinec, Rachel Howcroft, Ron Pinhasi, Mario Slaus
Childhood stress, using both subadult and adult remains from early mediaeval (8th -11th c. CE) sites on the eastern Adriatic coast is analysed in this report. A total of 242 individuals (83 subadults, 69 adult females, and 90 adult males) were assessed for the presence of linear enamel hypoplasia, cribra orbitalia, sub-periosteal new bone formation, and scurvy. In addition, the dietary profile of nine subadults was assessed by the analysis of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes from bulk collagen. Over three quarters of individuals with preserved permanent dentition (44/56 or 78...
March 14, 2018: Anthropologischer Anzeiger; Bericht über die Biologisch-anthropologische Literatur
S Justman
Though James Lind is renowned as a pioneer of the clinical trial, he records the 1747 trial aboard the Salisbury in passing, never followed up on it, never campaigned for clinical trials as a means of medical discovery, and eventually pronounced scurvy an insoluble enigma. The case can be made that in confessing his lack of an unfailing remedy for scurvy and his trouble making sense of the disease's behaviour, Lind did medicine a greater service than by conducting his now-famous trial. At the time, medical progress was hindered by the all-too-common practice of proclaiming success and concealing failure...
December 2017: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
J Moore, H E C Koon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: International Journal of Paleopathology
A González Martín, F J Robles Rodríguez, O Cambra-Moo, J Rascón Pérez, M Campo Martín
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: International Journal of Paleopathology
Matthew Granger, Peter Eck
Vitamin C is essential to prevent scurvy in humans and is implicated in the primary prevention of common and complex diseases such as coronary heart disease, stroke, and cancer. This chapter reviews the latest knowledge about dietary vitamin C in human health with an emphasis on studies of the molecular mechanisms of vitamin C maintenance as well as gene-nutrient interactions modifying these relationships. Epidemiological evidence indicates 5% prevalence for vitamin C deficiency and 13% prevalence for suboptimal status even in industrialized countries...
2018: Advances in Food and Nutrition Research
Laura M Kinlin, Ana C Blanchard, Shawna Silver, Shaun K Morris
We describe a case of scurvy in a 10-year-old boy with autism spectrum disorder. His clinical presentation was initially thought to be due to osteomyelitis, for which empirical antimicrobial therapy was initiated. Further invasive and ultimately unnecessary investigations were avoided when scurvy was considered in the context of a restricted diet and classic signs of vitamin C deficiency. Infectious Diseases specialists should be aware of scurvy as an important mimicker of osteoarticular infections when involved in the care of patients at risk for nutritional deficiencies...
February 6, 2018: International Journal of Infectious Diseases: IJID
Christine Lux-Battistelli, Daniel Battistelli
RATIONALE: Scurvy is often diagnosed at the state of well-established signs as, for example, skin and visceral purpura, gums involvement, loss of healthy teeth, which derive mostly from disturbance of collagen metabolism. Little is known about the state of latent scurvy, which symptoms are nonspecific and may mimic more common conditions such as weakness, leg pain, and muscle aching. PATIENT CONCERNS: We report 3 cases of extreme lassitude and leg pain in alcoholics...
November 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
James Burhop, Jennifer Gibson, Justin de Boer, Cyrus Heydarian
Scurvy in modern times may not be as rare as previously thought. The link between adequate intake of vitamin C and scurvy has been known since ancient times and is recorded in Ebers Papyrus. Recent reports indicate that, with restricted diets, vitamin C deficiency is being seen in infants exclusively fed plant-based formula and children with oral aversion, autism, restricted diets, and cerebral palsy. Additional at-risk groups include the older adults and patients having alcoholism. Often costly, emergency department visits and elaborate diagnostic studies lead to fruitless results when a simple diet history is often overlooked...
January 23, 2018: Pediatric Emergency Care
Heasim Sul
This article demonstrates the medicinal usage of ginseng in the West from 1660 to 1914. Asian[Korea] ginseng was first introduced into England in the early 17th century, and North American ginseng was found in the early 18th century. Starting from the late 17th century doctors prescribed ginseng to cure many different kinds of ailments and disease such as: fatigue general lethargy, fever, torpidity, trembling in the joints, nervous disorder, laughing and crying hysteria, scurvy, spermatic vessel infection, jaundice, leprosy, dry gripes and constipation, strangury, yellow fever, dysentery, infertility and addictions of alcohol, opium and tobacco, etc...
December 2017: Ŭi Sahak
Audrey W Jiang, Mahima Vijayaraghavan, Elliot G Mills, Anthony R Prisco, Joseph R Thurn
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 20, 2017: American Journal of Medicine
Haagen D Klaus
Diverse pathological processes can produce overlapping or even indistinguishable patterns of abnormal bone formation or destruction, representing a fundamental challenge in the understanding of ancient diseases. This paper discusses increasing rigor in differential diagnosis through the paleopathological study of scurvy. First, paleopathology's use of descriptive terminology can strive to more thoroughly incorporate international standards of anatomical terminology. Second, improved observation and description of abnormal skeletal features can help distinguish between anemia or vitamin C deficiency...
December 2017: International Journal of Paleopathology
Jane E Buikstra, Della C Cook, Katelyn L Bolhofner
This introductory chapter to the Special Issue on "Scientific Rigor in Paleopathology" serves to orient and introduce the chapters that follow through a detailed consideration of paleopathology as a 21st century intellectual field. In this vein, we first make the significant point that paleopathology is a profoundly interdisciplinary endeavor, encompassing aspects of the biomedical science, the humanities, and the social sciences. Thus, we suggest that no one practitioner can personally command the range of skills necessary for a 21st century paleopathologist...
December 2017: International Journal of Paleopathology
Matthew Pflipsen, Yevgeniy Zenchenko
The availability of proper nutrients is critical for the growth, development, maintenance, and repair of healthy dentition and oral tissues. Deficiencies particularly relevant to the dental practice are those in folate and other B complex vitamins; vitamins A, C, and D; calcium; fluoride; and protein. A lack of these nutrients affects nearly every structure in the oral cavity, causing or contributing to scurvy, cleft palate, enamel hypoplasia, poor mineralization, caries, and other pathoses. Damage to the dentition can also be observed in individuals with unhealthy habits; for example, a diet high in sugars will promote processes such as demineralization and caries...
November 2017: General Dentistry
Jolanta Guz, Ryszard Oliński
Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is a micronutrient best known for its anti-scurvy activity in humans. Vitamin C is involved in many biological processes involving enzymatic reactions that are catalyzed by members of dioxygenases which use Fe(II) and 2-oxoglutarate as a co-substrate.The article reviews recent data that suggest the involvement of ascorbate in dioxygenases catalyzed chromatin and DNA modifications which thereby contribute to epigenetic regulation. Concerning chromatin modification, the dioxygenases are involved in distinct demethylation reactions with varying specificity for the position of the lysine on the target histone...
August 24, 2017: Postȩpy Higieny i Medycyny Doświadczalnej
Simrat Kaur, Jatinder S Goraya
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 15, 2017: Indian Pediatrics
Joanna Moore, Hannah E C Koon
Recent analysis of the juvenile (≤12 years) human remains from a 19th century site in Wolverhampton, England revealed a relatively high level of nutritional deficiency diseases within the population. Indeed, 41.7% of the 48 juvenile skeletons analysed exhibited a combination of porous and proliferative bone lesions consistent with the pathological alterations associated with nutritional stress. This paper describes a pathological lesion on the inferior surface of the basilar portion of the occipital bone, not previously reported in association with infantile scurvy, but which was exhibited by 90% (N=9) of the 10 scorbutic individuals identified during this study...
September 2017: International Journal of Paleopathology
Anne Marie E Snoddy, Siân E Halcrow, Hallie R Buckley, Vivien G Standen, Bernardo T Arriaza
Studies of contemporary populations have demonstrated an association between decreased dietary diversity due to resource scarcity or underutilization and an increase in diseases related to poor micronutrient intake. With a reduction of dietary diversity, it is often the women and children in a population who are the first to suffer the effects of poor micronutrient status. Scurvy, a disease of prolonged vitamin C deficiency, is a micronutrient malnutrition disorder associated with resource scarcity, low dietary diversity, and/or dependence on high carbohydrate staple-foods...
September 2017: International Journal of Paleopathology
Zlatuse D Clark, Elizabeth L Frank
OBJECTIVES: Vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid) is a water-soluble micronutrient necessary for human life. Inadequate intake can lead to the fatal disease scurvy. Measurement of vitamin C is used to assess nutritional status and to monitor supplementation. The goal of this study was to develop a chromatographic method for the quantitation of vitamin C in human plasma. DESIGN AND METHODS: Samples were prepared by protein precipitation, addition of internal standard, and reduction with dithiothreitol...
December 1, 2016: Practical Laboratory Medicine
P Humbert, F Fanian, T Lihoreau, A Jeudy, G E Pierard
BACKGROUND: Bateman purpura is characterized by diffuse senile skin atrophy, senile purpura and spontaneous stellar pseudocicatrices. Cutaneous changes in the course of ageing have been related to lower levels of ascorbic acid into the dermis of elderly people. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we postulate that senile purpura could be linked to dermal vitamin C deficiency and could be corrected by topical administration of this vitamin. METHODS: A 12-weeks, hemi-member (forearm or leg), randomized double-blind comparative study was conducted in 18 patients with Bateman purpura aged over than 60 years...
August 17, 2017: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Marta González-Sabín, Eloy Rodríguez-Díaz, Susana Mallo-García, Ivan Astola-Hidalgo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 8, 2017: European Journal of Dermatology: EJD
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