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Neurocognitive and learning

R John Sawyer, S Marc Testa, Moira Dux
OBJECTIVE: Various research studies and neuropsychology practice organizations have reiterated the importance of developing embedded performance validity tests (PVTs) to detect potentially invalid neurocognitive test data. This study investigated whether measures within the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised (HVLT-R) and the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test - Revised (BVMT-R) could accurately classify individuals who fail two or more PVTs during routine clinical assessment. METHOD: The present sample of 109 United States military veterans (Mean age = 52...
October 19, 2016: Clinical Neuropsychologist
Kristina Kasparian, Karsten Steinhauer
First language (L1) attrition is a socio-linguistic circumstance where second language (L2) learning coincides with changes in exposure and use of the native-L1. Attriters often report experiencing a decline in automaticity or proficiency in their L1 after a prolonged period in the L2 environment, while their L2 proficiency continues to strengthen. Investigating the neurocognitive correlates of attrition alongside those of late L2 acquisition addresses the question of whether the brain mechanisms underlying both L1 and L2 processing are strongly determined by proficiency, irrespective of whether the language was acquired from birth or in adulthood...
October 14, 2016: Neuropsychologia
Elizabeth B Owens, Stephen P Hinshaw
Using a sample of 228 females with and without childhood attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder followed prospectively across 16 years, we measured childhood neurocognitive vulnerability via executive dysfunction using teacher-reported cognitive and learning problems. We then ascertained relations between dimensionally measured internalizing and externalizing psychopathology during adulthood and showed that childhood neurocognitive vulnerability reliably predicted such associated psychopathology. We identified six serial mediation pathways from childhood neurocognitive vulnerability to adult psychopathology through three early- and late-adolescent domains: individual (self-control and delay of gratification), peer (rejection/conflict and acceptance/friendship), and school (academic performance and school failure)...
November 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Raymond L Ownby, Drenna Waldrop-Valverde, Deborah L Jones, Sunil Sharma, Ritu Nehra, Adarsh M Kumar, Sudesh Prabhakar, Amarilis Acevedo, Mahendra Kumar
An evaluation of the effects of HIV infection on neurocognition over time is important for understanding disease progression. Changes in cognitive function can be evaluated longitudinally by using neuropsychological testing at repeated intervals. The assessment of change over time, however, is complicated by the potentially confounding influence of learning on repeated test administrations, often referred to as practice effect. In this study, we present data on testing of persons with or without HIV infection on a battery administered at study baseline and repeated 1 year later...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurovirology
Sarah Sallon, Yahav Dory, Yazeed Barghouti, Tsewang Tamdin, Rigzin Sangmo, Jamyang Tashi, Sonam Yangdon, Tenzin Yeshi, Tsetan Sadutshang, Michal Rotenburg, Elinor Cohen, Yehudit Harlavan, Galit Sharabi, Tali Bdolah-Abram
Mercury an important therapeutic substance in Tibetan Medicine undergoes complex "detoxification" prior to inclusion in multi-ingredient formulas. In an initial cross-sectional study, patients taking Tibetan Medicine for various conditions were evaluated for mercury toxicity. Two groups were identified: Group 1, patients taking " TSOTHEL: " the most important detoxified mercury preparation and Group 2, patients taking other mercury preparations or mercury free Tibetan Medicine. Atomic fluorescence spectrometry of Tibetan Medicine showed mercury consumption 130 µg/kg/day (Group 1) and 30 µg/kg/day (Group 2) (P ≤ 0...
October 13, 2016: Experimental Biology and Medicine
Lindsey Edwards, Lynne Aitkenhead, Dawn Langdon
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to establish the relationship between short-term memory capacity and reading skills in adolescents with cochlear implants. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A between-groups design compared a group of young people with cochlear implants with a group of hearing peers on measures of reading, and auditory and visual short-term memory capacity. The groups were matched for non-verbal IQ and age. The adolescents with cochlear implants were recruited from the Cochlear Implant Programme at a specialist children's hospital...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Stephen A Sands, Brian T Harel, Mirko Savone, Kara Kelly, Veena Vijayanathan, Jennifer Greene Welch, Lynda Vrooman, Lewis B Silverman, Peter D Cole
PURPOSE: Neurocognitive impairment is frequently observed among acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors within the domains of intelligence, attention, processing speed, working memory, learning, and memory. However, few have investigated treatment-induced changes in neurocognitive function during the first months of treatment. Additionally, dysfunction during treatment may be preceded by changes in biomarkers measured within cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Identification of acute declines in neurocognitive function, as well as predictive genotypes or biomarkers, could guide therapeutic trials of protective interventions...
October 10, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
L Ene, T D Marcotte, A Umlauf, C Grancea, A Temereanca, A Bharti, C L Achim, S Letendre, S M Ruta
We evaluated the impact of latent toxoplasmosis (LT) on neurocognitive (NC) and neurobehavioural functioning in young adults with and without chronic HIV infection, using a standardised NC test battery, self-reported Beck Depression Inventory, Frontal System Behavior Scale, MINI-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and risk-assessment battery. 194 young adults (median age 24years, 48.2% males) with chronic HIV infection (HIV+) since childhood and 51 HIV seronegative (HIV-) participants were included. HIV+ individuals had good current immunological status (median CD4: 479 cells/μl) despite a low CD4 nadir (median: 93 cells/μl)...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Neuroimmunology
Kalpana J Kallianpur, Marissa Sakoda, Louie Mar A Gangcuangco, Lishomwa C Ndhlovu, Tracie Umaki, Dominic Chow, Suwarat Wongjittraporn, Cecilia M Shikuma
BACKGROUND: Chronic HIV disease is associated with neurocognitive impairment and age-related conditions such as frailty. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether regional brain volumetric changes correlate with frailty parameters in older (≥ 40 years) HIV+ patients on stable combination antiretroviral therapy. METHOD: Thirty-five HIV-infected participants in the Hawaii Aging with HIV Cohort - Cardiovascular Disease study underwent T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging, frailty assessment and neuropsychological testing...
2016: Open Medicine Journal
Sibylle Metzler, Diane Dvorsky, Christine Wyss, Carlos Nordt, Susanne Walitza, Karsten Heekeren, Wulf Rössler, Anastasia Theodoridou
An important aim in schizophrenia research is to optimize the prediction of psychosis and to improve strategies for early intervention. The objectives of this study were to explore neurocognitive performance in individuals at risk for psychosis and to optimize predictions through a combination of neurocognitive and psychopathological variables. Information on clinical outcomes after 24 months was available from 118 subjects who had completed an extensive assessment at baseline. Subjects who had converted to psychosis were compared with subjects who had not...
September 30, 2016: Psychiatry Research
Marie Arsalidou, Nancie Im-Bolter
Children's cognitive abilities improve significantly over childhood and adolescence. We know from behavioral research that core cognitive processes such as working memory and mental attention improve significantly across development. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows for investigating the typically developing, living brain in action. In the last twenty years we have learned a great deal about brain correlates associated with how adults hold and manipulate information in mind, however, neurocognitive correlates across development remain inconsistent...
October 1, 2016: Brain Imaging and Behavior
Marc B Lande, Donald L Batisky, Juan C Kupferman, Joshua Samuels, Stephen R Hooper, Bonita Falkner, Shari R Waldstein, Peter G Szilagyi, Hongyue Wang, Jennifer Staskiewicz, Heather R Adams
OBJECTIVE: To compare neurocognitive test performance of children with primary hypertension with that of normotensive controls. STUDY DESIGN: Seventy-five children (10-18 years of age) with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension and 75 frequency-matched normotensive controls had baseline neurocognitive testing as part of a prospective multicenter study of cognition in primary hypertension. Subjects completed tests of general intelligence, attention, memory, executive function, and processing speed...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
Thomas P Schmidt, David L Pennington, Stephanie L Cardoos, Timothy C Durazzo, Dieter J Meyerhoff
INTRODUCTION: Intact neurocognition and early cognitive recovery during abstinence are important for substance use treatment outcome. Yet, little is known about them in the largest group of treatment seekers today, individuals with polysubstance use disorders (PSU). This study primarily contrasted PSU and individuals with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) on neurocognitive and inhibitory control measures and, secondarily, measured changes during abstinence in PSU. METHOD: At one month of abstinence from all substances except tobacco, 36 PSU and 69 AUD completed neurocognitive assessments of executive function, general intelligence, auditory-verbal learning/memory, visuospatial learning/memory/skills, processing speed, working memory, fine motor skills, and cognitive efficiency...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Christopher M Ryan, Eelco van Duinkerken, Caterina Rosano
Mild cognitive dysfunction is a well-established complication of diabetes and its management, although large numbers of psychologists and health professionals may be unaware of its existence, clinical implications, and etiology. Drawing on results from key studies, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, this article delineates the neurocognitive phenotypes characteristic of Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D), and identifies the most plausible risk factors, both those that may be modifiable, like degree of metabolic control, and those that cannot be changed, like the age when a child or adult is diagnosed...
October 2016: American Psychologist
Bhing-Leet Tan, Sara-Ann Lee, Jimmy Lee
Social cognition is the mental process which underpins social interactions. Increasingly, it has been recognized to be impaired in people with schizophrenia, resulting in functional problems. Correspondingly, the past ten years have seen huge developments in the study of interventions to ameliorate social cognitive deficits among people with schizophrenia. In the present review, we systematically reviewed published studies on social cognitive interventions from 2005 to 2015. Of the 61 studies included in this review, 20 were on broad-based social cognitive interventions, which incorporated neurocognitive training, specialized learning technique or virtual reality social skills training...
July 27, 2016: Asian Journal of Psychiatry
Laura M E Blanken, Tonya White, Sabine E Mous, Maartje Basten, Ryan L Muetzel, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Marjolein Wals, Jan van der Ende, Frank C Verhulst, Henning Tiemeier
Psychiatric symptoms in childhood are closely related to neurocognitive deficits. However, it is unclear whether internalising and externalising symptoms are associated with general or distinct cognitive problems. We examined the relation between different types of psychiatric symptoms and neurocognitive functioning in a population-based sample of 1177 school-aged children. Internalising and externalising behaviour was studied both continuously and categorically. For continuous, variable-centred analyses, broadband scores of internalising and externalising symptoms were used...
September 19, 2016: European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Lisa M Jacola, Kim Edelstein, Wei Liu, Ching-Hon Pui, Robert Hayashi, Nina S Kadan-Lottick, Deokumar Srivastava, Tara Henderson, Wendy Leisenring, Leslie L Robison, Gregory T Armstrong, Kevin R Krull
BACKGROUND: Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are at risk for neurocognitive deficits that affect development in adolescence and young adulthood, and influence educational attainment and future independence. We examined a large and diverse cohort of survivors to identify risk predictors and modifiers of these outcomes. METHODS: In this cohort study, cognitive and behaviour symptoms were assessed via a standardised parent questionnaire for 1560 adolescent survivors of ALL diagnosed between 1970 and 1999...
October 2016: Lancet Psychiatry
Simon M Reader
Social learning, learning from others, is a powerful process known to impact the success and survival of humans and non-human animals alike. Yet we understand little about the neurocognitive and other processes that underpin social learning. Social learning has often been assumed to involve specialized, derived cognitive processes that evolve and develop independently from other processes. However, this assumption is increasingly questioned, and evidence from a variety of organisms demonstrates that current, recent, and early life experience all predict the reliance on social information and thus can potentially explain variation in social learning as a result of experiential effects rather than evolved differences...
2016: F1000Research
Meta van Toutert, Han Diesfeldt, Dirk Hoek
The six tests in the Amsterdam Dementia Screening Test (ADST) examine the cognitive domains of episodic memory (delayed picture recognition, word learning), orientation, category fluency (animals and occupations), constructional ability (figure copying) and executive function (alternating sequences). New normative data were collected in a sample of 102 elderly volunteers (aged 65-94), including subjects with medical or other health conditions, except dementia or frank cognitive impairment (MMSE > 24). Included subjects were independent in complex instrumental activities of daily living...
September 15, 2016: Tijdschrift Voor Gerontologie en Geriatrie
Lianyan Huang, Scott Hayes, Guang Yang
Anesthetic agents are often administered in the neonatal period, a time of rapid brain development and synaptogenesis. Mounting evidence suggests that anesthetics can disrupt neurocognitive development, particularly in cases of multiple or prolonged anesthetic exposure. Previous studies have shown that administering multiple doses of ketamine-xylazine (KX) anesthesia to neonatal mice can induce long-term changes to synaptic plasticity in the cortex, but the effect on neurocognitive function remains unclear...
September 10, 2016: Neurotoxicology and Teratology
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