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Vestibular disorders

David S Thylur, Russell E Jacobs, John L Go, Arthur W Toga, John K Niparko
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF-MRI) at 11.7 T to visualize membranous structures of the human inner ear. SPECIMENS: Three temporal bones were extracted from cadaveric human heads for use with small-bore UHF-MRI. INTERVENTION: Ex vivo cadaveric temporal bone specimens were imaged using an 11.7 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner via T1- and T2-weighted-imaging with and without contrast...
October 12, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
Yi Zhang, Bo Liu, Rui Wang, Ruo Jia, Xin Gu
BACKGROUND: Meniere's disease is a unique, progressive disease of the inner ear. The complex manifestation presents diagnostic challenges. The cochlear symptoms often present before vertigo and tend to be ignored. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of cochlear symptoms and functions associated with Meniere's disease to investigate the regularity of the development of this disorder. METHODS: One-hundred fifteen patients who were diagnosed with definite unilateral Meniere's disease at the Hearing and Vestibular Clinic of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of Beijing Tongren Hospital from August 2013 to November 2015 were recruited in this retrospective study...
2016: Chinese Medical Journal
Jennifer C Reneker, Vinay Cheruvu, Jingzhen Yang, Chad E Cook, Mark A James, M Clay Moughiman, Joseph A Congeni
BACKGROUND: Dizziness is often reported after a sports-related concussion. Forces experienced at the time of the concussion can cause an injury to multiple anatomical areas, including the central nervous system, the vestibular system, and the cervical spine, each of which is sufficient to cause dizziness. Medical professionals routinely use the subjective history to develop hypotheses about what may be causing a patient's dizziness. No previous studies have attempted to differentiate the source of the dizziness through precise patient descriptors or the triggers of dizziness...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Maristela Mian Ferreira, Maurício Malavasi Ganança, Heloisa Helena Caovilla
INTRODUCTION: Otolith function can be studied by testing the subjective visual vertical, because the tilt of the vertical line beyond the normal range is a sign of vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a disorder of one or more labyrinthine semicircular canals caused by fractions of otoliths derived from the utricular macula. OBJECTIVE: To compare the subjective visual vertical with the bucket test before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo...
September 28, 2016: Brazilian Journal of Otorhinolaryngology
Verónica Gómez Toledo, Ileana Gutiérrez Farfán, Antonio Verduzco-Mendoza, Emilio Arch-Tirado
BACKGROUND: Tinnitus is defined as the conscious perception of a sensation of sound that occurs in the absence of an external stimulus. This audiological symptom affects 7% to 19% of the adult population. The aim of this study is to describe the associated comorbidities present in patients with tinnitus usingjoint and conditional probability analysis. PATIENTS: Patients of both genders, diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral tinnitus, aged between 20 and 45 years, and had a full computerised medical record, were selected...
October 13, 2016: Cirugia y Cirujanos
A Ernst, I Todt, J Wagner
BACKGROUND: Dehiscence syndromes of the semicircular canals are a relatively new group of neurotological disorders. They have a variety of symptoms with hearing/balance involvement. Younger patients have clinically relevant symptoms in only about one third of cases. In addition to etiology and pathogenesis, the present paper describes diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities using a patient series of the authors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This nonrandomized prospective study included 52 patients with uni-/bilateral dehiscence syndromes of the superior and/or posterior canal (SCDS/PCDS), diagnosed with high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT) of the petrous bone...
October 14, 2016: HNO
Prashant Singh, Braden Kuo
Nausea and vomiting result from continuous interactions among gastrointestinal, central nervous system, and autonomic nervous system. Despite being closely associated, central pathways of nausea and vomiting appear to be at least partly different and nausea is no longer considered only a penultimate step of vomiting. Although our understanding of central pathways of nausea has improved over the last one decade, it is still very basic. Afferent pathways from gastrointestinal tract via vagus, vestibular system, and chemoreceptor trigger zone project to nucleus tractus solitarius which, in turn, relays the signal to central pattern generator initiating multiple downstream pathways...
October 12, 2016: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology
Yaser Ghavami, Yarah M Haidar, Kasra N Ziai, Omid Moshtaghi, Jay Bhatt, Harrison W Lin, Hamid R Djalilian
OBJECTIVE: Mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS) is a balance disorder that typically starts after an extended exposure to passive motion, such as a boat or plane ride. Management is typically supportive (e.g. physical therapy), and symptoms that persist beyond 6 months have been described as unlikely to remit. This study was conducted to evaluate the response of patients with MdDS to management with migraine prophylaxis, including lifestyle changes and medical therapy. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective review...
October 12, 2016: Laryngoscope
Ling Zong, Kaitian Chen, Xuan Wu, Min Liu, Hongyan Jiang
OBJECTIVE: Identification of rare deafness genes for inherited congenital sensorineural hearing impairment remains difficult, because a large variety of genes are implicated. In this study we applied targeted capture and next-generation sequencing to uncover the underlying gene in a three-generation Han family segregating recessive inherited hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa. METHODS: After excluding mutations in common deafness genes GJB2, SLC26A4 and the mitochondrial gene, genomic DNA of the proband of a Han family was subjected to targeted next-generation sequencing...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Wee Tin K Kao, Lorne S Parnes, Richard A Chole
OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common vestibular disorder with an incidence between 10.7 and 17.3 per 100,000 persons per year. The mechanism for BPPV has been postulated to involve displaced otoconia resulting in canalithiasis. Although particulate matter has been observed in the endolymph of affected patients undergoing posterior canal occlusion surgery, an otoconial origin for the disease is still questioned. STUDY DESIGN: In this study, particulate matter was extracted from the posterior semicircular canal of two patients and examined with scanning electron microscopy...
October 11, 2016: Laryngoscope
M Dieterich, J P Staab, T Brandt
Functional and psychiatric disorders that cause vestibular symptoms (i.e., vertigo, unsteadiness, and dizziness) are common. In fact, they are more common than many well-known structural vestibular disorders. Neurologists and otologists are more likely to encounter patients with vestibular symptoms due to persistent postural-perceptual dizziness or panic disorder than Ménière's disease or bilateral vestibular loss. Successful approaches to identifying functional and psychiatric causes of vestibular symptoms can be incorporated into existing practices without much difficulty...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Daniel R Gold, David S Zee
Dizziness and vertigo are among the most common symptoms to bring a patient to a neurologist. Because symptoms are often vague and imprecise, a systematic approach is essential. By categorizing vestibular disorders based on timing, triggers, and duration, as well as through focused oculomotor and vestibular examinations, the vast majority of neuro-otologic diagnoses can be made at the bedside. Here the authors discuss historical and examination pearls for the most common neuro-otologic disorders.
October 2016: Seminars in Neurology
Andoret van Wyk, Carina A Eksteen, Piet J Becker, Barbara M Heinze
INTRODUCTION: Visual impairment, specifically eye movement disorders and vestibular dysfunction may have a negative influence on the functional recovery in post-stroke patients. This type of sensory dysfunction may further be associated with poor functional outcome in patients' post-stroke. METHODS: In phase 1, a cross-sectional survey (n = 100) will be conducted to determine the prevalence of eye movement disorders and vestibular dysfunction in patients who sustained a stroke...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Satoru Kudose, Michael Kyriakos, Michael Magdi Awad
: Plexiform schwannoma (PS) is an uncommon variant of schwannoma characterized by a multinodular (plexiform) growth pattern. It comprises up to 5 % of all schwannomas. The association between PS and neurofibromatosis type 1 or type 2 (NF1/NF2) is only rarely reported. Most cases of PS occur in the skin and subcutaneous soft tissue, with only a few reports of digestive tract involvement. We describe an 18-year-old male with NF2 who had bilateral vestibular schwannomas and multiple cutaneous PSs, and a 3-year history of abdominal pain...
September 30, 2016: Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology
J R Tian, X Q Zhao
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2016: Zhonghua Nei Ke za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Internal Medicine]
Maya Elin O'Neil, Megan Callahan, Kathleen F Carlson, Mai Roost, Benjamin Laman-Maharg, Elizabeth W Twamley, Grant L Iverson, Daniel Storzbach
OBJECTIVE: This study examined symptom reporting related to the 10th Edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) criteria for postconcussional syndrome (PCS) in Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) Veterans. Our aims were to: (a) examine relationships among PCS symptoms by identifying potential subscales of the British Columbia Postconcussion Symptom Inventory (BC-PSI); and (b) examine group differences in BC-PSI items and subscales in Veterans with and without blast exposure, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Dominic Pérennou, Céline Piscicelli
OBJECTIVE: Visual vertical (VV) measurements are being increasingly used for routine clinical assessment of spatial cognition, to investigate otolithic vestibular function and identify altered verticality perception as a possible cause of postural disorders after stroke. The objective of this paper was to synthesize knowledge of assessment methods for testing VV after stroke. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: This systematic review, following the PRISMA statement, involved a search for articles in Medline via PubMed published up to November 2015 by using the search terms "visual vertical", "verticality perception" and "stroke"...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Laure Mathevon, Nicolas Leroux, Céline Piscicelli, Emmanuelle Clarac, Shenhao Dai, Patrice Davoine, Paul Krack, Dominic Perennou
OBJECTIVE: To take care of postural disorders is a major issue in Parkinson's disease (PD). We present a documented observation suggesting the existence of a biased representation of verticality in PD, resulting in a severe retropulsion and recurrent falls. A rehabilitation program aimed to modulate verticality perception dramatically improved the postural perception of the vertical, trunk posture and balance abilities, and reduced retropulsion as well as lastingly fall frequency. OBSERVATIONS: A 68 year-old patient with Parkinson's disease fall backward 3 times a day...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Salma Jeribi, Abdelmoneem Yahia, Imen Achour, Bouthaina Hammemi, Abdelmoneem Ghorbel, Mohamed Habib Elleuch, Sameh Ghroubi
OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of completing a vestibular rehabilitation treatment protocol on postural balance, dizziness and quality of life in patients with peripheral vertigo. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective study concerning patients with instability due to unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder. The patients were evaluated with a clinical examination and a test of static and dynamic balance on the Satel(®) platform in which length, mediolateral (LongX) and anterior-posterior deviations (long Y) were monitored...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Emin Mehmet Ceylan, Bariş Önen Ünsalver, Alper Evrensel
Meningiomas are mostly benign tumors of the meninges that may stay clinically silent or present first with psychiatric symptoms only. We present a case of medial cranial fossa meningioma that was first diagnosed as mixed anxiety disorder with dissociative symptoms and vertigo. In light of the intact neurological and vestibular system examination, our patient's vertigo and depersonalization were firstly addressed as psychosomatic symptoms of the psychiatric syndrome. Despite decreased anxiety and improved mood, dissociative symptoms and vertigo were resistant to treatment which prompted further research yielding a left hemisphere localized meningioma...
2016: Case Reports in Psychiatry
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