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infectious disease drugs

Claudiu T Supuran
The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC is found in numerous organisms across the tree of life, with seven distinct classes known to date. CA inhibition can be exploited for the treatment of edema, glaucoma, seizures, obesity, cancer and infectious diseases. A myriad of CA inhibitor (CAI) classes and inhibition mechanisms have been identified over the past decade, mainly through structure-based drug design approaches. Five different CA inhibition mechanisms are presently known. Areas covered: Recent advances in structure-based CAI design are reviewed, with periodic table-based organization of inhibitor classes...
October 26, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Yukihiro Yoshimura, Nobuyuki Miyata, Makiko Miyajima, Yohei Sakamoto, Yuichiro Amano, Natsuo Tachikawa
The number of patients returning from or staying abroad is likely to increase in the future. We performed a retrospective study of patients returning from abroad in our travel clinic in Japan. All patients presenting within 6 months of traveling abroad between 2004 and 2014 were included in the present study. A total of 2374 (mean age, 35 years) patients were seen by doctors specializing in treating infectious diseases. Of these, 918 were females and 87 of them lived abroad. Diagnoses and exposure regions were recorded for all patients...
October 22, 2016: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy: Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy
Asif J Iqbal, Edward A Fisher, David R Greaves
What is inflammation's big idea? In this brief overview of the role of myeloid cells in inflammation, we will critically discuss what drives the initiation, amplification, and resolution of inflammation in different anatomical sites in response to different pathological stimuli. It can be argued that we have a good understanding of the basic principles that underlie myeloid cell activation and the mobilization of innate immune cells to sites of injury and infection in acute inflammation. The challenge now for inflammation biologists is to understand how resolution of this normal physiological response goes wrong in hyperacute and chronic inflammation...
October 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Kerry Anne Rambaran, Charles F Seifert
Drug-induced interstitial lung disease is a rare condition attributed to several medications, including antimicrobial agents such as amphotericin B, anti-inflammatory agents such as methotrexate, biologic agents such as bevacizumab, and cardiovascular agents and chemotherapeutic agents. We describe the case of a 73-year-old female who developed interstitial lung disease following chronic use of nitrofurantoin for a urinary tract infection (UTI). The patient was taking nitrofurantoin 100 mg capsules twice daily for approximately 3 years...
December 2016: Drug Saf Case Rep
Donald P Rice, John J Faragon, Sarah Banks, Lisa M Chirch
Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology
Ken M Kunisaki, Dennis E Niewoehner, Gary Collins, Bitten Aagaard, Nafisah B Atako, Elzbieta Bakowska, Amanda Clarke, Giulio Maria Corbelli, Ernest Ekong, Sean Emery, Elizabeth B Finley, Eric Florence, Rosa M Infante, Cissy M Kityo, Juan Sierra Madero, Daniel E Nixon, Ellen Tedaldi, Jørgen Vestbo, Robin Wood, John E Connett
BACKGROUND: Observational data have been conflicted regarding the potential role of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) as a causative factor for, or protective factor against, COPD. We therefore aimed to investigate the effect of immediate versus deferred ART on decline in lung function in HIV-positive individuals. METHODS: We did a nested substudy within the randomised, controlled Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment (START) trial at 80 sites in multiple settings in 20 high-income and low-to-middle-income countries...
October 20, 2016: Lancet Respiratory Medicine
E Proksch, D Dähnhardt, S Dähnhardt-Pfeiffer, R Fölster-Holst
The permeability barrier plays an important role in numerous skin diseases. Particularly well known is the importance of this barrier in eczema. In irritative-toxic contact dermatitis, the first step in the pathogenesis is the disturbance of the permeability barrier by irritative-toxic noxious substances. Only after damage to the barrier is achieved can irritants and allergens penetrate into the living epidermis. In atopic eczema due to an impaired barrier, allergens penetrate from the environment into the skin and cause or worsen the eczema...
October 21, 2016: Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift Für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und Verwandte Gebiete
Aaron S Kesselheim, Wesley Eddings, Tara Raj, Eric G Campbell, Jessica M Franklin, Kathryn M Ross, Lisa A Fulchino, Jerry Avorn, Joshua J Gagne
BACKGROUND: Generic drugs are cost-effective versions of brand-name drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) following proof of pharmaceutical equivalence and bioequivalence. Generic drugs are widely prescribed by physicians, although there is disagreement over the clinical comparability of generic drugs to brand-name drugs within the physician community. The objective of this survey was to assess physicians' perceptions of generic drugs and the generic drug approval process...
2016: PloS One
Guigang Li, Jingmin Guo, Rong Liu, Weikun Hu, Lingjuan Xu, Juan Wang, Subo Cai, Hong Zhang, Yingting Zhu
Background: To explore the prevalence of lacrimal duct obstruction in patients with infectious keratitis, and the necessity of lacrimal duct dredge in the treatment of human infectious keratitis. Methodology/Principle Findings: The design is prospective, non-control case series. Thirty-one eyes from twenty-eight continuous patients with infectious keratitis were included in this study. The presence/absence of lacrimal duct obstruction was determined by the lacrimal duct irrigation test. The diagnosis of infectious keratitis was made based on clinical manifestations, cornea scraping microscopic examination and bacterial/fungus culture...
2016: International Journal of Medical Sciences
David F Tough, Paul P Tak, Alexander Tarakhovsky, Rab K Prinjha
Immune-mediated diseases are clinically heterogeneous but they share genetic and pathogenic mechanisms. These diseases may develop from the interplay of genetic factors and environmental or lifestyle factors. Exposure to such factors, including infectious agents, is associated with coordinated changes in gene transcription owing to epigenetic alterations. A growing understanding of how epigenetic mechanisms control gene expression patterns and cell function has been aided by the development of small-molecule inhibitors that target these processes...
October 21, 2016: Nature Reviews. Drug Discovery
James J Cody, Wannaporn Ittiprasert, André N Miller, Lucie Henein, Margaret M Mentink-Kane, Michael H Hsieh
Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO)-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC) at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Walter H Moos, Carl A Pinkert, Michael H Irwin, Douglas V Faller, Krishna Kodukula, Ioannis P Glavas, Kosta Steliou
Preclinical Research Approximately 2,500 years ago, Hippocrates used the word herpes as a medical term to describe lesions that appeared to creep or crawl on the skin, advocating heat as a possible treatment. During the last 50 years, pharmaceutical research has made great strides, and therapeutic options have expanded to include small molecule antiviral agents, protease inhibitors, preventive vaccines for a handful of the papillomaviruses, and even cures for hepatitis C virus infections. However, effective treatments for persistent and recurrent viral infections, particularly the highly prevalent herpesviruses, continue to represent a significant unmet medical need, affecting the majority of the world's population...
October 20, 2016: Drug Development Research
Yaovi M G Hounmanou, Robinson H Mdegela, Tamègnon V Dougnon, Ofred J Mhongole, Edward S Mayila, Joseph Malakalinga, George Makingi, Anders Dalsgaard
BACKGROUND: Cholera, one of the world's deadliest infectious diseases, remains rampant and frequent in Tanzania and thus hinders existing control measures. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the occurrence of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in wastewater, fish and vegetables during a non-outbreak period in Morogoro, Tanzania. METHODS: From October 2014 to February 2015, 60 wastewater samples, 60 fish samples from sewage stabilization ponds and 60 wastewater irrigated vegetable samples were collected...
October 18, 2016: BMC Research Notes
Andrea Matucci, Francesca Nencini, Sara Pratesi, Enrico Maggi, Alessandra Vultaggio
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Biological agents have been a treatment option for many chronic immune-mediated diseases as well as oncological conditions. The issue of infusion reactions is of particular importance and at least in some cases related to the immunogenicity of these drugs with the production of antidrug antibodies. Infectious diseases are a well described side-effect of certain biological agents, even if, at least regarding the biological agents used for the treatment of allergic diseases and immune-mediated diseases, the risk has been reduced...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
G Suleyman, R Kenney, M J Zervos, A Weinmann
WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: Outpatient parenteral therapy (OPAT) has become a safe and effective modality for patients requiring intravenous or prolonged antimicrobial therapy since the 1970s. It is being increasingly utilized in various settings; however, studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of clinic-based OPAT are limited. Since 2012, patients being considered for OPAT have required an infectious disease (ID) consultation at our institution. Candidates receiving once-daily antimicrobials who were ineligible for home infusion or nursing home placement as determined by their insurance companies and those who preferred the clinic over nursing home or home infusion were referred to the ID clinic...
October 16, 2016: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Marc D Cohen, Edward Keystone
Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed at the CD20 molecule on the surfaces of some but not all B cells. It depletes almost all peripheral B cells, but other niches of B cells are variably depleted, including synovium. Its mechanism of action in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is only partially understood. Rituximab was efficacious in clinical trials of patients with RA, including those who are methotrexate naïve, those with an incomplete response to methotrexate, and those with an incomplete response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors...
December 2015: Rheumatol Ther
Nicole Robbins, Michaela Spitzer, Wenliang Wang, Nicholas Waglechner, Dhruv J Patel, Jonathan S O'Brien, Linda Ejim, Obi Ejim, Mike Tyers, Gerard D Wright
Natural products are invaluable historic sources of drugs for infectious diseases; however, the discovery of novel antimicrobial chemical scaffolds has waned in recent years. Concurrently, there is a pressing need for improved therapeutics to treat fungal infections. We employed a co-culture screen to identify ibomycin, a large polyketide macrolactone that has preferential killing activity against Cryptococcus neoformans. Using chemical and genome methods, we determined the structure of ibomycin and identified the biosynthetic cluster responsible for its synthesis...
October 7, 2016: Cell Chemical Biology
Nicholas S Sigona, Jeffrey M Steele, Christopher D Miller
OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of a pharmacist-driven beta-lactam allergy interview on antimicrobial therapy. SETTING: Tertiary care academic medical center. PRACTICE SETTING: Clarification of beta-lactam allergy may expand treatment options for patients and potentially improve outcomes, reduce toxicity, and reduce costs. PRACTICE INNOVATION: At our institution, a pilot service using a pharmacy resident and infectious diseases clinical pharmacist was implemented to clarify beta-lactam allergy information and, where appropriate, recommend a change to the patient's antibiotic therapy...
October 8, 2016: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association: JAPhA
Sara Tedeschi, Filippo Trapani, Maddalena Giannella, Francesco Cristini, Fabio Tumietto, Michele Bartoletti, Annalisa Liverani, Salvatore Pignanelli, Luisa Toni, Roberto Pederzini, Augusto Cavina, Pierluigi Viale
OBJECTIVE To assess the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) on antibiotic consumption, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI), and antimicrobial resistance patterns in a rehabilitation hospital. DESIGN Quasi-experimental study of the periods before (from January 2011 to June 2012) and after (from July 2012 to December 2014) ASP implementation. SETTING 150-bed rehabilitation hospital dedicated to patients with spinal-cord injuries. INTERVENTION Beginning in July 2012, an ASP was implemented based on systematic bedside infectious disease (ID) consultation and structural interventions (ie, revision of protocols for antibiotic prophylaxis and education focused on the appropriateness of antibiotic prescriptions)...
October 17, 2016: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Luís Felipe S P Azeredo, Julia P Coutinho, Valquiria A P Jabor, Patricia R Feliciano, Maria Cristina Nonato, Carlos R Kaiser, Carla Maria S Menezes, Amanda S O Hammes, Ernesto Raul Caffarena, Lucas V B Hoelz, Nicolli B de Souza, Glaécia A N Pereira, Isabela P Cerávolo, Antoniana U Krettli, Nubia Boechat
Malaria remains one of the most serious global infectious diseases. An important target for antimalarial chemotherapy is the enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from Plasmodium falciparum (PfDHODH), which is responsible for the conversion of dihydroorotate to orotate in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we have designed and synthesized fifteen 7-arylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine derivatives using ring bioisosteric replacement and molecular hybridization of functional groups based on the highly active 5-methyl-N-(naphthalen-2-yl)-2-(trifluoromethyl)- [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-amine...
September 30, 2016: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
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