Read by QxMD icon Read

breast density bmi

Oguzhan Alagoz, Mehmet Ali Ergun, Mucahit Cevik, Brian L Sprague, Dennis G Fryback, Ronald E Gangnon, John M Hampton, Natasha K Stout, Amy Trentham-Dietz
The University of Wisconsin Breast Cancer Epidemiology Simulation Model (UWBCS), also referred to as Model W, is a discrete-event microsimulation model that uses a systems engineering approach to replicate breast cancer epidemiology in the US over time. This population-based model simulates the lifetimes of individual women through 4 main model components: breast cancer natural history, detection, treatment, and mortality. A key feature of the UWBCS is that, in addition to specifying a population distribution in tumor growth rates, the model allows for heterogeneity in tumor behavior, with some tumors having limited malignant potential (i...
April 2018: Medical Decision Making: An International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making
Jennifer D Brooks, Janice S Sung, Malcolm C Pike, Irene Orlow, Frank Z Stanczyk, Jonine L Bernstein, Elizabeth A Morris
Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) is the degree to which normal breast tissue enhances on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI-density is a volumetric measure of breast density that is highly correlated with mammographic density, an established breast cancer risk factor. Endogenous estrogen concentrations are positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk and BPE has been shown to be sensitive to hormonal exposures. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between BPE and MRI-density and serum hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women...
March 9, 2018: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
Nina Roswall, Zorana Jovanovic Andersen, My von Euler-Chelpin, Ilse Vejborg, Elsebeth Lynge, Steen Solvang Jensen, Ole Raaschou-Nielsen, Anne Tjønneland, Mette Sørensen
OBJECTIVES: Traffic is the most important source of community noise, and it has been proposed to be associated with a range of disease outcomes, including breast cancer. As mammographic breast density (MD) is one of the strongest risk factors for developing breast cancer, the present study investigated whether there is an association between residential exposure to traffic noise and MD in a Danish cohort. METHODS: We included women with reproductive and lifestyle information available from the Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort, who also participated in the Copenhagen Mammography Screening Programme (n = 5,260)...
March 8, 2018: Cancer Causes & Control: CCC
Ching-Ching Yang, Pei-Chieh Yu, Jau-Ming Ruan, Yu-Cheng Chen
PURPOSE: The target detectability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was investigated to achieve sufficient image quality for patient positioning over a course of treatment session while maintaining radiation exposure from CBCT imaging as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). METHODS: Body CBCT scans operated in half-fan mode were acquired with three different protocols: CBCTlowD , CBCTmidD , and CBCThighD , which resulted in weighted CT dose index (CTDIw ) of 0...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics
Aliya Alimujiang, Kellie R Imm, Catherine M Appleton, Graham A Colditz, Catherine S Berkey, Adetunji T Toriola
Although childhood adiposity is inversely associated with breast cancer risk, the association of childhood adiposity with mammographic density in premenopausal women has not been adequately studied. We analyzed data from 365 premenopausal women who came in for screening mammography at Washington University in St. Louis from 2015 to 2016. Body size at age 10 was self-reported using Somatotype pictogram. Body mass index (BMI) at age 10 was imputed using data from Growing Up Today Study. Volpara software was used to evaluate volumetric percent density (VPD), dense volume (DV) and non-dense volume (NDV)...
March 2, 2018: Cancer Prevention Research
Parisa Tehranifar, Carmen B Rodriguez, Ayana April-Sanders, Elise Desperito, Karen M Schmitt
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer incidence is lower in many U.S ethnic minority and foreign-born population groups. Investigating whether migration and acculturation patterns in risk are reflected in disease biomarkers may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: We compared the distribution of breast cancer risk factors across U.S.-born white, African American and Hispanic women, and foreign-born Hispanic women (n=477, ages 40-64 years, 287 born in Caribbean countries)...
February 23, 2018: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Sanna Byström, Martin Eklund, Mun-Gwan Hong, Claudia Fredolini, Mikael Eriksson, Kamila Czene, Per Hall, Jochen M Schwenk, Marike Gabrielson
BACKGROUND: Mammographic breast density is one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer, but molecular understanding of how breast density relates to cancer risk is less complete. Studies of proteins in blood plasma, possibly associated with mammographic density, are well-suited as these allow large-scale analyses and might shed light on the association between breast cancer and breast density. METHODS: Plasma samples from 1329 women in the Swedish KARMA project, without prior history of breast cancer, were profiled with antibody suspension bead array (SBA) assays...
February 14, 2018: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
Dejana Braithwaite, Diana L Miglioretti, Weiwei Zhu, Joshua Demb, Amy Trentham-Dietz, Brian Sprague, Jeffrey A Tice, Tracy Onega, Louise M Henderson, Diana S M Buist, Elad Ziv, Louise C Walter, Karla Kerlikowske
Importance: First-degree family history is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but controversy exists about the magnitude of the association among older women. Objective: To determine whether first-degree family history is associated with increased risk of breast cancer among older women, and identify whether the association varies by breast density. Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective cohort study between 1996 and 2012 from 7 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registries located in New Hampshire, North Carolina, San Francisco Bay area, western Washington state, New Mexico, Colorado, and Vermont...
February 12, 2018: JAMA Internal Medicine
Markku Voutilainen, Nina Hutri-Kähönen, Päivi Tossavainen, Taina Sipponen, Niina Pitkänen, Tomi Laitinen, Eero Jokinen, Tapani Rönnemaa, Jorma S A Viikari, Olli T Raitakari, Markus Juonala
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Several genetic and environmental risk factors have been linked to chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The incidence of IBD has significantly increased in developed countries during last decades. The aim of the present study was to examine childhood risk factors for subsequent IBD diagnosis in a longitudinal cohort study of children and adolescents. METHODS: A Finnish study population consisting of 3551 children and adolescents originally evaluated as part of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study in 1980...
January 31, 2018: Digestive and Liver Disease
Hyuna Sung, Jiansong Ren, Jing Li, Ruth M Pfeiffer, Yong Wang, Jennifer L Guida, Yi Fang, Jufang Shi, Kai Zhang, Ni Li, Shen Wang, Luopei Wei, Nan Hu, Gretchen L Gierach, Min Dai, Xiaohong R Yang, Jie He
Elevated mammographic density (MD) is an established breast cancer risk factor. Studies examining relationships between MD and breast cancer risk factors are limited in China, where established breast cancer risk factors are less prevalent but dense breasts are more prevalent than Western countries. This study included 11,478 women (45-69 years; 36% premenopausal) participating in an ongoing national cancer screening program in 11 urban provinces in China and predicted as having high-risk for breast cancer...
2018: NPJ Breast Cancer
Susan M Astley, Elaine F Harkness, Jamie C Sergeant, Jane Warwick, Paula Stavrinos, Ruth Warren, Mary Wilson, Ursula Beetles, Soujanya Gadde, Yit Lim, Anil Jain, Sara Bundred, Nicola Barr, Valerie Reece, Adam R Brentnall, Jack Cuzick, Tony Howell, D Gareth Evans
BACKGROUND: High mammographic density is associated with both risk of cancers being missed at mammography, and increased risk of developing breast cancer. Stratification of breast cancer prevention and screening requires mammographic density measures predictive of cancer. This study compares five mammographic density measures to determine the association with subsequent diagnosis of breast cancer and the presence of breast cancer at screening. METHODS: Women participating in the "Predicting Risk Of Cancer At Screening" (PROCAS) study, a study of cancer risk, completed questionnaires to provide personal information to enable computation of the Tyrer-Cuzick risk score...
February 5, 2018: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
Evelyn Hsieh, Qin Wang, Renzhi Zhang, Xin Niu, Weibo Xia, Liana Fraenkel, Karl L Insogna, Jing Li, Jennifer S Smith, Chunwu Zhou, You-Lin Qiao, Pin Zhang
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer survivors are at high risk for fracture due to cancer treatment-induced bone loss, however, data is scarce regarding the scope of this problem from an epidemiologic and health services perspective among Chinese women with breast cancer. METHODS: We designed a cross-sectional study comparing prevalence of vertebral fractures among age- and BMI-matched women from two cohorts. Women in the Breast Cancer Survivors cohort were enrolled from a large cancer hospital in Beijing...
January 30, 2018: BMC Cancer
Michael Baumann, Sergio Ulhoa Dani, Daniel Dietrich, Andreas Hochstrasser, Dirk Klingbiel, Michael Thomas Mark, Walter F Riesen, Thomas Ruhstaller, Arnoud J Templeton, Beat Thürlimann
BACKGROUND: Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) is widely supplemented in breast cancer survivors because of the role of vitamin D in multiple health outcomes. METHODS: We conducted an observational study in 332 women in Eastern Switzerland with early, i.e., nonmetastatic breast cancer. Tumour-, patient-related and sociodemographic variables were recorded. Cholecalciferol intake and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) levels were measured at the first visit (baseline) and during a follow-up visit in a median of 210 days (range 87-857) after the first visit...
January 29, 2018: Swiss Medical Weekly
Kimberly A Bertrand, A Heather Eliassen, Susan E Hankinson, Bernard A Rosner, Rulla M Tamimi
Prior research suggests that several endogenous hormones in premenopausal women are associated with breast cancer risk; however, few studies have evaluated associations of endogenous hormones with mammographic density (MD) in premenopausal women. We conducted a cross-sectional study of plasma hormone levels in relation to MD among 634 cancer-free premenopausal women in the Nurses' Health Study II. We measured percent MD from screening mammograms using a computer-assisted method. We assayed estradiol, estrone, and estrone sulfate in blood samples timed in early follicular and mid-luteal phases of the menstrual cycle as well as testosterone, androstenedione, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and anti-Müllerian hormone in luteal or untimed samples...
January 12, 2018: Hormones & Cancer
Karthik Ghosh, Robert A Vierkant, Ryan D Frank, Stacey Winham, Daniel W Visscher, Vernon S Pankratz, Christopher G Scott, Kathleen Brandt, Mark E Sherman, Derek C Radisky, Marlene H Frost, Lynn C Hartmann, Amy C Degnim, Celine M Vachon
BACKGROUND: Over 40% of women undergoing breast screening have mammographically dense breasts. Elevated mammographic breast density (MBD) is an established breast cancer risk factor and is known to mask tumors within the dense tissue. However, the association of MBD with high risk benign breast disease (BBD) is unknown. METHOD: We analyzed data for 3400 women diagnosed with pathologically confirmed BBD in the Mayo Clinic BBD cohort from 1985-2001, with a clinical MBD measure (either parenchymal pattern (PP) or Breast Imaging Reporting and Data Systems (BI-RADS) density) and expert pathology review...
December 19, 2017: Breast Cancer Research: BCR
Kavitha Krishnan, Laura Baglietto, Jennifer Stone, Catriona McLean, Melissa C Southey, Dallas R English, Graham G Giles, John L Hopper
BACKGROUND: In a previous paper, we had assumed that the risk of screen-detected breast cancer mostly reflects inherent risk, and the risk of whether a breast cancer is interval versus screen-detected mostly reflects risk of masking. We found that inherent risk was predicted by body mass index (BMI) and dense area (DA) or percent dense area (PDA), but not by non-dense area (NDA). Masking, however, was best predicted by PDA but not BMI. In this study, we aimed to investigate if these associations vary by tumor characteristics and mode of detection...
December 16, 2017: BMC Cancer
Alexandra M Binder, Camila Corvalan, Verónica Mericq, Ana Pereira, José Luis Santos, Steve Horvath, John Shepherd, Karin B Michels
Epigenetic age is an indicator of biological aging, capturing the impact of environmental and behavioral influences across time on cellular function. Deviance between epigenetic age and chronological age (AgeAccel) is a predictor of health. Pubertal timing has similarly been associated with cancer risk and mortality rate among females. We examined the association between AgeAccel and pubertal timing and adolescent breast composition in the longitudinal Growth and Obesity Cohort Study. AgeAccel was estimated in whole blood using the Horvath method at breast Tanner 2 (B2) and 4 (B4)...
2018: Epigenetics: Official Journal of the DNA Methylation Society
Sangeun Jung, Mee Gang Kim, Jong In Lee
Objective: To identify the prevalence of lumbar scoliosis in breast cancer patients and to investigate the potential risk factors of lumbar scoliosis. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed in breast cancer patients aged more than 40 years who underwent dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning between January 2014 and December 2014. We divided the patients into control and experimental groups in order to investigate the influence of breast cancer treatment...
October 2017: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Stephen W Duffy, Oliver W E Morrish, Prue C Allgood, Richard Black, Maureen G C Gillan, Paula Willsher, Julie Cooke, Karen A Duncan, Michael J Michell, Hilary M Dobson, Roberta Maroni, Yit Y Lim, Hema N Purushothaman, Tamara Suaris, Susan M Astley, Kenneth C Young, Lorraine Tucker, Fiona J Gilbert
BACKGROUND: Mammographic density has been shown to be a strong independent predictor of breast cancer and a causative factor in reducing the sensitivity of mammography. There remain questions as to the use of mammographic density information in the context of screening and risk management, and of the association with cancer in populations known to be at increased risk of breast cancer. AIM: To assess the association of breast density with presence of cancer by measuring mammographic density visually as a percentage, and with two automated volumetric methods, Quantra™ and VolparaDensity™...
January 2018: European Journal of Cancer
Frédérica Schyrr, Anita Wolfer, Jérôme Pasquier, Anne-Laure Nicoulaz, Olivier Lamy, Olaia Naveiras
This retrospective study attempts to establish if a correlation exists between osteoporosis and hematopoiesis before and after adjuvant chemotherapy in the context of non-metastatic breast cancer. Osteoporosis is interpreted both as a direct marker of osteoblastic decline and as an indirect marker of increased bone marrow adiposity within the hematopoietic microenvironment. Patients from the "Centre du Sein" at CHUV (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois) undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy were included in this study...
February 2018: Annals of Hematology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"