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exertional compartment syndrome

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29349018/open-4-compartment-fasciotomy-for-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-of-the-leg
#1
Amos Z Dai, Michael Zacchilli, Neha Jejurikar, Hien Pham, Laith Jazrawi
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a significant source of lower extremity pain and morbidity in the athletic population. Although endoscopic techniques have been introduced, open fasciotomy remains the mainstay of surgical treatment because of the paucity of evidence in support of an endoscopic approach. The literature on surgical management of CECS is mixed, and overall success rates are modest at best. Optimizing surgical technique, including prevention of neurovascular injury and wound complications, can make a significant impact on the clinical outcome...
December 2017: Arthroscopy Techniques
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29315124/diagnosis-and-treatment-of-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-of-the-forearm-in-motocross-riders
#2
Joseph Humpherys, Zachary Lum, Jondy Cohen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 9, 2018: JBJS Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29169304/determination-of-the-predictive-clinical-parameters-to-diagnose-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome
#3
Alban Fouasson-Chailloux, Pierre Menu, Jérémie Allorent, Marc Dauty
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is characterized by pain occurring during physical activity. As clinical examination is not sufficient to diagnose it, intracompartmental pressure (ICP) measure is used for CECS confirmation. Numerous clinical signs are reported but their diagnosis predictive ability has never been studied. We aimed to determine if the 12 classically reported clinical signs are predictive of CECS. We performed a single-centre retrospective cohort study on patients referred for CECS suspicion...
November 23, 2017: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29164162/functional-outcomes-after-the-surgical-management-of-isolated-anterolateral-leg-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome
#4
Grace Gatenby, Samuel Haysom, Bruce Twaddle, Stewart Walsh
Background: Failure rates of up to 20% have been reported after fasciotomy for chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). There is some evidence that postoperative failure and complication rates are higher in the posterior compartments of the lower leg than the anterolateral compartments. Isolated compartment surgery may put patients at risk of requiring revision surgery because of the risk of developing posterior compartment disease. Hypothesis: Isolated anterolateral fasciotomy for CECS, in the absence of posterior compartment symptoms, produces satisfactory functional outcomes...
November 2017: Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29126337/factors-predicting-lower-leg-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-in-a-large-population
#5
Johan A de Bruijn, Aniek P M van Zantvoort, David van Klaveren, Michiel B Winkes, Marike van der Cruijsen-Raaijmakers, Adwin R Hoogeveen, Joep A W Teijink, Marc R Scheltinga
Knowledge about lower leg chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is largely obtained from highly selected populations. Patient characteristics may therefore not be appropriate for the general population. Our purpose was to describe a heterogeneous population of individuals suspected of lower leg CECS and to identify predictors of CECS. Charts of individuals who were analyzed for exercise-induced lower leg pain in a referral center between 2001 and 2013 were retrospectively studied. Patients were included if history and physical examination were suggestive of CECS and if they had undergone a dynamic intracompartmental pressure measurement...
January 2018: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29101975/chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-in-athletes
#6
REVIEW
Betty Liu, Gustavo Barrazueta, David E Ruchelsman
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) refers to exercise-induced, reversible increases in pressure within well-defined inelastic fascial compartments leading to compromised tissue perfusion followed by functional loss, ischemic pain, and neurologic symptoms. Symptoms typically resolve when the activity ceases and there are usually no permanent sequelae. In the upper extremity, this condition most commonly affects athletes during sports requiring repetitive and vigorous gripping, such as rowers. In addition to clinical history and examination, a number of methods aid diagnosis, including compartment pressure measurements, magnetic resonance imaging, and near infrared spectroscopy...
November 2017: Journal of Hand Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29059243/muscle-oxygenation-in-type-1-diabetic-and-non-diabetic-patients-with-and-without-chronic-compartment-syndrome
#7
Patrik Gustafsson, Albert G Crenshaw, David Edmundsson, Göran Toolanen, Sead Crnalic
BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetic patients and non-diabetic patients were referred for evaluation for chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) based on clinical examination and complaints of activity-related leg pain in the region of the tibialis anterior muscle. Previous studies using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) showed greater deoxygenation during exercise for CECS patients versus healthy controls; however, this comparison has not been done for diabetic CECS patients. METHODS: We used NIRS to test for differences in oxygenation kinetics for Type 1 diabetic patients diagnosed with (CECS-diabetics, n = 9) versus diabetic patients without (CON-diabetics, n = 10) leg anterior chronic exertional compartment syndrome...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29035986/long-term-outcome-of-mini-open-surgical-decompression-for-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-of-the-forearm-in-professional-motorcycling-riders
#8
Giorgio Gondolini, Paolo Schiavi, Francesco Pogliacomi, Francesco Ceccarelli, Tommaso Antonetti, Michele Zasa
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate results of mini-open fasciotomy (MOF) in high-level motorcycling or motocross riders with chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) at long-term follow-up (minimum 5 years). DESIGN: Case series. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV. SETTING: University Hospital/Private Practice. PATIENTS: Fifty-four professional motorcycling riders treated with MOF for a CECS of the forearm from January 2006 to June 2011...
October 10, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28985488/plantar-pressure-differences-between-cases-with-symptoms-of-clinically-diagnosed-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-and-asymptomatic-controls
#9
Andrew Roberts, David Hulse, Alexander N Bennett, Sharon Dixon
BACKGROUND: Anterior chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg has been hypothesised to develop due to excessive muscle activity and foot pronation. Plantar pressure variables related to lower limb muscle activity and foot type may therefore provide insight into this condition. METHODS: 70 male cases and 70 asymptomatic controls participated. A clinical diagnosis was established from typical symptoms, with clinical examination excluding other pathologies...
October 2, 2017: Clinical Biomechanics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28978583/management-and-patients-perspective-regarding-a-common-peroneal-nerve-schwannoma-a-rare-cause-of-lower-leg-pain-in-a-young-individual
#10
Aniek Pm van Zantvoort, Paul Cuppen, Marc R Scheltinga
The differential diagnosis of exercise-induced lower leg pain in young individuals is extensive and includes entities such as chronic exertional compartment syndrome, popliteal arterial entrapment syndrome, cystic adventitial disease, medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fractures. Peripheral nerve-related lower leg pain syndromes are unusual. We present a 41-year-old woman who was diagnosed with an ancient schwannoma of the right common peroneal nerve (CPN) as a rare cause of lower leg pain. This case report provides simple diagnostic bedside tools that may be used to diagnose CPN abnormalities...
October 4, 2017: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28952402/evaluation-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-a-review-of-current-literature
#11
Sravya Vajapey, Timothy L Miller
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a rare condition that usually affects distance runners and other running athletes. It is characterized by pain and pressure in one or multiple muscle compartments with repetitive physical activity. Reduction in pain typically occurs with cessation of activity. Evaluation of CECS consists of a thorough history of patient symptoms and ruling out of other causes of symptoms. Post-exercise pressure measurements can help confirm the diagnosis when symptoms are consistent and imaging evaluation negative for other causes...
November 2017: Physician and Sportsmedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28934539/popliteal-artery-entrapment-syndrome-bilateral-lower-extremity-involvement
#12
Havalee T Henry, Lauren K Szolomayer, Bauer E Sumpio, Karen M Sutton
Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a condition in which compression of the popliteal neurovascular structures results in symptoms of lower extremity claudication by way of a constricting anatomic structure or a hypertrophied surrounding musculature. This diagnosis is often missed or misdiagnosed because popliteal artery entrapment syndrome has a presentation similar to that of exertional compartment syndrome. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome may result in persistent disability or unnecessary morbidity or prevent athletes' return to sport...
September 21, 2017: Orthopedics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890727/popliteal-artery-entrapment-or-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome
#13
Christopher Gaunder, Brandon McKinney, Jessica Rivera
Diagnosis of lower limb pain in an athlete can be a challenging task due to the variety of potential etiologies and ambiguity of presenting symptoms. Five of the most commonly encountered causes of limb pain in athletes are chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS), medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), tibial stress fractures, soleal sling syndrome, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES). Of these, the least frequent but potentially most serious of the pathologies is PAES. With an incidence of less than 1% seen in living subject studies, the condition is rare...
2017: Case Reports in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874445/gamma-interferon-mediates-experimental-cerebral-malaria-by-signaling-within-both-the-hematopoietic-and-nonhematopoietic-compartments
#14
Ana Villegas-Mendez, Patrick Strangward, Tovah N Shaw, Ivana Rajkovic, Vinko Tosevski, Ruth Forman, Werner Muller, Kevin N Couper
Experimental cerebral malaria (ECM) is a gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-dependent syndrome. However, whether IFN-γ promotes ECM through direct and synergistic targeting of multiple cell populations or by acting primarily on a specific responsive cell type is currently unknown. Here, using a panel of cell- and compartment-specific IFN-γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2)-deficient mice, we show that IFN-γ causes ECM by signaling within both the hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartments. Mechanistically, hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic compartment-specific IFN-γR signaling exerts additive effects in orchestrating intracerebral inflammation, leading to the development of ECM...
November 2017: Infection and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28869903/biomechanical-differences-between-cases-with-suspected-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-and-asymptomatic-controls-during-running
#15
Andrew Roberts, David Roscoe, David Hulse, Alexander N Bennett, Sharon Dixon
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) has been hypothesised, following clinical observations, to be the result of abnormal biomechanics predominantly at the ankle. Treatment of CECS through running re-education to correct these abnormalities has been reported to improve symptoms. However no primary research has been carried out to investigate the movement patterns of those with CECS. This study aimed to compare the running kinematics and muscle activity of cases with CECS and asymptomatic controls...
October 2017: Gait & Posture
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28832205/endoscopic-fascia-release-for-forearm-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-case-report-and-surgical-technique
#16
Elizabeth A Miller, Anna L Cobb, Tyson K Cobb
BACKGROUND: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of the forearm is traditionally treated with open compartment release requiring large incisions that can result in less than optimal esthetic results. The purpose of this study is to describe a case report of 2 professional motocross patients with forearm CECS treated endoscopically using a minimally invasive technique. METHODS: Two professional motocross racers presented with a history of chronic proximal volar forearm pain when motocross riding...
September 2017: Hand: Official Journal of the American Association for Hand Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28817409/trest-as-a-new-diagnostic-variable-for-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-of-the-forearm-a-prospective-cohort-analysis-of-124-athletes
#17
Sergi Barrera-Ochoa, Eva Correa-Vazquez, Irene Gallardo-Calero, Sleiman Haddad, Andrea Sallent, Francisco Soldado, David Campillo-Recio, Xavier Mir-Bullo
OBJECTIVES: To measure the accuracy of currently used intracompartmental pressure (ICP) diagnostic variables for forearm chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) and a new ICP diagnostic variable, TRest, the recovery time between the maximum ICP and return to resting pressure. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort. Level evidence IV. SETTING: University-affiliated tertiary hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with suspected forearm CECS, 1990 to 2014...
August 16, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28810980/risk-factors-for-rhabdomyolysis-in-the-u-s-army
#18
Owen T Hill, Dennis E Scofield, Jenna Usedom, Lakmini Bulathsinhala, Craig McKinnon, Paul Kwon, Timothy Haley, Robert Carter
The standardized mortality rate of rhabdomyolysis (RM) in Active Duty U.S. Army Soldiers is considerably higher than in the civilian population. RM occurs when large amounts of intracellular contents from damaged skeletal muscle escape into circulation, leading to serious sequelae (e.g., acute renal failure, hyperkalemia, compartment syndrome). Extended physical exertion, especially in hot environments, and trauma can precipitate RM. The aim of this study was to identify RM risk factors among U.S. Active Duty Army (ADA) Soldiers...
July 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28750263/biomechanical-differences-between-cases-with-chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-and-asymptomatic-controls-during-walking-and-marching-gait
#19
Andrew Roberts, David Roscoe, David Hulse, Alexander N Bennett, Sharon Dixon
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a significant problem in military populations that may be caused by specific military activities. This study aimed to investigate the kinematic and kinetic differences in military cases with chronic exertional compartment syndrome and asymptomatic controls. 20 males with symptoms of chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the anterior compartment and 20 asymptomatic controls were studied. Three-dimensional lower limb kinematics and kinetics were compared during walking and marching...
October 2017: Gait & Posture
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28706822/endoscopic-fasciotomy-of-the-superficial-and-deep-posterior-compartments-of-the-leg
#20
Tun Hing Lui
Chronic exertional compartment syndrome is a rare cause of lower leg pain incurred during sports activities and typically affects young athletes who need to return to their activity level as quickly as possible. Nonoperative treatments are often unsuccessful and fasciotomy of the involved compartment is the treatment of choice. Endoscopically assisted release of the anterior and deep compartments is proven to be safe and effective. Endoscopically assisted deep posterior compartment release via an incision 1 to 3 cm behind the medial tibial border has high risk of injury to the great saphenous and perforating veins and the saphenous nerve...
June 2017: Arthroscopy Techniques
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