keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Brain cooling

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29777174/how-does-blood-regulate-cerebral-temperatures-during-hypothermia
#1
Stephen Blowers, Ian Marshall, Michael Thrippleton, Peter Andrews, Bridget Harris, Iain Bethune, Prashant Valluri
Macro-modeling of cerebral blood flow can help determine the impact of thermal intervention during instances of head trauma to mitigate tissue damage. This work presents a bioheat model using a 3D fluid-porous domain coupled with intersecting 1D arterial and venous vessel trees. This combined vascular porous (VaPor) model resolves both cerebral blood flow and energy equations, including heat generated by metabolism, using vasculature extracted from MRI data and is extended using a tree generation algorithm...
May 18, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29772467/yawning-and-cortisol-levels-in-multiple-sclerosis-potential-new-diagnostic-tool
#2
Simon B N Thompson, Alister Coleman, Nicola Williams
Yawning is a significant behavioural response and, together with cortisol, is potentially a new diagnostic marker of neurological diseases. Evidence of an association between yawning and cortisol was found which supports the Thompson Cortisol Hypothesis and thermoregulation hypotheses, indication that brain cooling occurs when yawning. 117 volunteers aged 18-69 years were randomly allocated to experimentally controlled conditions to provoke yawning. Thirty-three had been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Saliva cortisol samples were collected before and after yawning or after stimuli presentation in the absence of yawning...
May 2, 2018: Multiple Sclerosis and related Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29764556/-extra-longtime-continuous-chest-compression-to-rescue-cardiopulmonary-arrest-a-case-report-and-the-literature-review
#3
Yan Zhang, Tianxue Yue, Kexin Sun, Jiang Wang, Ruiwu Zhu
The new cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guideline emphasize the importance of chest compression, which was considered as the first step to CPR. The duration for CPR is usually limited to 30 minutes. With the development of new technology and evidence-based medicine, the success of extra longtime CPR has become possible, which is of great significance to some patients with cardiac arrest (CA), but the time limit has not been determined. On February 23rd in 2016, a 76-year-old female patient with respiratory and cardiac arrest who was on the third day after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT) was admitted to the intensive care unit of the General Hospital of Fushun Mining Bureau...
May 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29761344/beyond-the-magic-bullet-current-progress-of-therapeutic-vaccination-in-multiple-sclerosis
#4
Barbara Willekens, Nathalie Cools
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and impaired repair mechanisms that lead to neurological disability. The crux of MS is the patient's own immune cells attacking self-antigens in the CNS, namely the myelin sheath that protects nerve cells of the brain and spinal cord. Restoring antigen-specific tolerance via therapeutic vaccination is an innovative and exciting approach in MS therapy. Indeed, leveraging the body's attempt to prevent autoimmunity, i...
May 14, 2018: CNS Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29757611/simple-synthetic-molecular-hydrogels-from-self-assembling-alkylgalactonamides-as-scaffold-for-3d-neuronal-cell-growth
#5
Anaïs Chalard, Laurence Vaysse, Pierre Joseph, Laurent Malaquin, Sandrine Souleille, Barbara Lonetti, Jean-Christophe Sol, Isabelle Loubinoux, Juliette Fitremann
In this work, we demonstrated that the hydrogel obtained from a very simple and single synthetic molecule, N-heptyl-galactonamide was a suitable scaffold for the growth of neuronal cells in 3D. We evidenced by confocal microscopy the presence of the cells into the gel up to a depth of around 200 μm, demonstrating that the latter was permissive to cell growth and enabled a true 3D colonization and organization. It also supported successfully the differentiation of adult human neuronal stem cells (hNSCs) into both glial and neuronal cells and the development of a really dense neurofilament network...
May 14, 2018: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29754932/mild-hypothermia-inhibits-the-notch-3-and-notch-4-activation-and-seizure-after-stroke-in-the-rat-model
#6
Guo-Shuai Yang, Xiao-Yan Zhou, Xue-Fang An, Xuan-Jun Liu, Yan-Jun Zhang, Dan Yu
Ischemic brain injury is an important cause for seizure. Mild hypothermia of the brain or the whole body is an effective way to remit the post-stroke seizure. Our previous study revealed an implication of Notch 1 and 2 in the post-stroke seizure. This study further investigated the involvement of Notch 3 and 4 in post-stroke seizure and the effect of mild hypothermia on these two factors. A global cerebral ischemia (GCI) model was conducted in Sprague Dawley rats. Seizure activity was evaluated by the frequency of seizure attacks, seizure severity scores, and seizure discharges...
May 4, 2018: Pathology, Research and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29710738/medico-legal-implications-of-hypothermic-neuroprotection-in-the-newborn
#7
S M Donn, J M Fanaroff
Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) continues to be a significant source of long term neurological sequelae in infants born at or near term. In the past decade, selective head or whole body cooling has shown promising benefit in ameliorating some of the brain injury from intrapartum asphyxial insults and has become standard care in most developed countries. A decision to offer neuroprotective hypothermia (NPH) may engender subsequent litigation because it presupposes an acute intrapartum injury. Conversely, failing to offer cooling may be interpreted as a violation in the standard of care...
April 24, 2018: Journal of Neonatal-perinatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29703266/statistical-analysis-plan-for-the-polar-rct-the-prophylactic-hypothermia-trial-to-lessen-traumatic-brain-injury-randomised-controlled-trial
#8
Jeffrey Presneill, Dashiell Gantner, Alistair Nichol, Colin McArthur, Andrew Forbes, Jessica Kasza, Tony Trapani, Lynnette Murray, Stephen Bernard, Peter Cameron, Gilles Capellier, Olivier Huet, Lynette Newby, Stephen Rashford, Jeffrey V Rosenfeld, Tony Smith, Michael Stephenson, Dinesh Varma, Shirley Vallance, Tony Walker, Steve Webb, D James Cooper
BACKGROUND: The Prophylactic hypOthermia to Lessen trAumatic bRain injury-Randomised Controlled Trial (POLAR-RCT) will evaluate whether early and sustained prophylactic hypothermia delivered to patients with severe traumatic brain injury improves patient-centred outcomes. METHODS: The POLAR-RCT is a multicentre, randomised, parallel group, phase III trial of early, prophylactic cooling in critically ill patients with severe traumatic brain injury, conducted in Australia, New Zealand, France, Switzerland, Saudi Arabia and Qatar...
April 27, 2018: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29702328/in-vivo-and-ex-vivo-elastic-properties-of-brain-tissues-measured-with-ultrasound-elastography
#9
Yan-Lin Liu, Dong Liu, Liang Xu, Chen Su, Guo-Yang Li, Lin-Xue Qian, Yanping Cao
Determining the mechanical properties of brain tissues is essential in the field of brain biomechanics. In this paper, we use ultrasound-based shear wave elastography to measure both in vivo and ex vivo elastic properties of brain tissues. Our results demonstrate that the shear modulus from in vivo measurements is about 47% higher than that given by the ex vivo measurements (p value = 0.0063). The change in ex vivo elastic properties within 60-min post-mortem is negligible. The results also show that within 60-min post-mortem and in a temperature range of 37-23 °C, the elastic properties of brain tissues approximately linearly depend on the temperature in both cooling and re-heating processes...
April 19, 2018: Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29697052/resting-state-functional-connectivity-analysis-of-the-mouse-brain-using-intrinsic-optical-signal-imaging-of-cerebral-blood-volume-dynamics
#10
Yuto Yoshida, Mitsuyuki Nakao, Norihiro Katayama
Resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the human brain is closely related with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Mice are widely used to investigate the physiological mechanisms of such disorders, because of the applicability of invasive experimental techniques. Thus, studies on rsFC of the mouse brain are essential to link physiological mechanisms with these disorders in humans. In this study, we investigated the applicability of intrinsic optical signal imaging of cerebral blood volume (IOSI-CBV) for rsFC analysis of the mouse brain...
April 26, 2018: Physiological Measurement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29687042/tissue-oxidative-metabolism-can-increase-the-difference-between-local-temperature-and-arterial-blood-temperature-by-up-to-1-3-o-c-implications-for-brain-brown-adipose-tissue-and-muscle-physiology
#11
REVIEW
Dmitry V Zaretsky, Andrej A Romanovsky, Maria V Zaretskaia, Yaroslav I Molkov
Tissue temperature increases, when oxidative metabolism is boosted. The source of nutrients and oxygen for this metabolism is the blood. The blood also cools down the tissue, and this is the only cooling mechanism, when direct dissipation of heat from the tissue to the environment is insignificant, e.g. , in the brain. While this concept is relatively simple, it has not been described quantitatively. The purpose of the present work was to answer two questions: 1) to what extent can oxidative metabolism make the organ tissue warmer than the body core, and, 2) how quickly are changes in the local metabolism reflected in the temperature of the tissue? Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that, at equilibrium, given that heat exchange with the organ is provided by the blood, the temperature difference between the organ tissue and the arterial blood is proportional to the arteriovenous difference in oxygen content, does not depend on the blood flow, and cannot exceed 1...
2018: Temperature: Multidisciplinary Biomedical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29681213/therapeutic-whole-body-hypothermia-reduces-mortality-in-severe-traumatic-brain-injury-if-the-cooling-index-is-sufficiently-high-meta-analyses-of-the-effect-of-single-cooling-parameters-and-their-integrated-measure
#12
Emoke Olah, Laszlo Poto, Peter Hegyi, Imre Szabo, Petra Hartmann, Margit Solymar, Erika Petervari, Marta Balasko, Tamas Habon, Zoltan Rumbus, Judit Tenk, Ildiko Rostas, Jordan Weinberg, Andrej A Romanovsky, Andras Garami
Therapeutic hypothermia was investigated repeatedly as a tool to improve the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), but previous clinical trials and meta-analyses found contradictory results. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of therapeutic whole-body hypothermia on the mortality of adult patients with severe TBI by using a novel approach of meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to February 2017. The identified human studies were evaluated regarding statistical, clinical, and methodological designs to ensure inter-study homogeneity...
April 21, 2018: Journal of Neurotrauma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29675862/hemodialysis-a-model-for-extreme-physiology-in-a-vulnerable-patient-population
#13
REVIEW
Jeroen P Kooman, Krassimir Katzarski, Frank M van der Sande, Karel M Leunissen, Peter Kotanko
Hemodialysis (HD) is a lifesaving treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease, which is very efficient in the correction of abnormalities of the internal environment. However, this efficiency also induces significant hemodynamic, thermal, and respiratory stressors. These have parallels with the extreme physiologic demands which are normally mainly experienced by healthy subjects under adverse environmental conditions, with the difference that they must be endured by a vulnerable patient population. Hemodynamic stress induced by ultrafiltration leads to a decline in circulating blood volume, which may result in intradialytic hypotension (IDH) and changes in tissue perfusion, which may have long-term consequences for the function of vital organs such as the brain and the heart...
April 19, 2018: Seminars in Dialysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29664111/morphological-and-functional-changes-in-trpm8-expressing-corneal-cold-thermoreceptor-neurons-during-aging-and-their-impact-on-tearing-in-mice
#14
Ignacio Alcalde, Almudena Íñigo-Portugués, Omar González-González, Laura Almaraz, Enol Artime, Cruz Morenilla-Palao, Juana Gallar, Félix Viana, Jesús Merayo-Lloves, Carlos Belmonte
Morphological and functional alterations of peripheral somatosensory neurons during the aging process lead to a decline of somatosensory perception. Here, we analyze the changes occurring with aging in trigeminal ganglion (TG), TRPM8-expressing cold thermoreceptor neurons innervating the mouse cornea, which participate in the regulation of basal tearing and blinking and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of dry eye disease (DED). TG cell bodies and axonal branches were examined in a mouse line (TRPM8BAC -EYFP) expressing a fluorescent reporter...
April 17, 2018: Journal of Comparative Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29651510/-vomiting-and-collapse-of-a-28-year-old-male-long-distance-runner-in-middle-european-summer
#15
J Herold, A Mitrasch, E Lorenz, U Lodes, I Tanev, R Braun-Dullaeus, F Meyer
BACKGROUND: Hyperthermia often ends fatally and must therefore be promptly recognized and adequately treated. CASE: A 28-year-old man participated in a long-distance race (3 km) on a hot summer day (28 °C). The runner collapsed, had to vomit but continued the run and reached the finish. Neurologically, the patient presented with intermittent cerebral seizures. External cooling batteries were immediately applied and cold infusions were started. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit of the university hospital (body temperature 40...
April 12, 2018: Der Internist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650049/variation-in-general-supportive-and-preventive-intensive-care-management-of-traumatic-brain-injury-a-survey-in-66-neurotrauma-centers-participating-in-the-collaborative-european-neurotrauma-effectiveness-research-in-traumatic-brain-injury-center-tbi-study
#16
Jilske A Huijben, Victor Volovici, Maryse C Cnossen, Iain K Haitsma, Nino Stocchetti, Andrew I R Maas, David K Menon, Ari Ercole, Giuseppe Citerio, David Nelson, Suzanne Polinder, Ewout W Steyerberg, Hester F Lingsma, Mathieu van der Jagt
BACKGROUND: General supportive and preventive measures in the intensive care management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) aim to prevent or limit secondary brain injury and optimize recovery. The aim of this survey was to assess and quantify variation in perceptions on intensive care unit (ICU) management of patients with TBI in European neurotrauma centers. METHODS: We performed a survey as part of the Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study...
April 13, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29622488/cerebral-autoregulation-and-conventional-and-diffusion-tensor-imaging-magnetic-resonance-imaging-in-neonatal-hypoxic-ischemic-encephalopathy
#17
Melisa Carrasco, Jamie Perin, Jacky M Jennings, Charlamaine Parkinson, Maureen M Gilmore, Raul Chavez-Valdez, An N Massaro, Raymond C Koehler, Frances J Northington, Aylin Tekes, Jennifer K Lee
BACKGROUND: Deviation of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) from the range that optimizes cerebral autoregulatory vasoreactivity (optimal MAP) could increase neurological injury from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We tested whether a global magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain injury score and regional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are associated with optimal MAP in neonates with HIE. METHODS: Twenty-five neonates cooled for HIE were monitored with the hemoglobin volume index...
April 2, 2018: Pediatric Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29567583/event-related-brain-potentials-elicited-by-high-speed-cooling-of-the-skin-a-robust-and-non-painful-method-to-assess-the-spinothalamic-system-in-humans
#18
Roxane De Keyser, Emanuel N van den Broeke, Arthur Courtin, André Dufour, André Mouraux
OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether cool-evoked potentials (CEP) elicited by brisk innocuous cooling of the skin could serve as an alternative to laser-evoked potentials (LEP), currently considered as the best available neurophysiological tool to assess the spinothalamic tract and diagnose neuropathic pain. METHODS: A novel device made of micro-Peltier elements and able to cool the skin at -300 °C/s was used to record CEPs elicited by stimulation of the hand dorsum in 40 healthy individuals, characterize the elicited responses, and assess their signal-to-noise ratio...
March 8, 2018: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29562785/extracellular-vesicles-derived-from-wharton-s-jelly-mesenchymal-stem-cells-prevent-and-resolve-programmed-cell-death-mediated-by-perinatal-hypoxia-ischemia-in-neuronal-cells
#19
Marianne S Joerger-Messerli, Byron Oppliger, Marialuigia Spinelli, Gierin Thomi, Ivana di Salvo, Philipp Schneider, Andreina Schoeberlein
Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) insult in the perinatal phase harbors a high risk of encephalopathy in the neonate. Brain cells undergo apoptosis, initiating neurodegeneration. So far, therapeutic approaches such as cooling remain limited. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) exhibits therapeutic success despite the short-time survival in the host brain, providing strong evidence that their beneficial effects are largely based on secreted factors, including extracellular vesicles (EVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of human Wharton's jelly MSC (hWJ-MSC)-derived EVs on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, using an in vitro model of oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) mimicking HI injury in the mouse neuroblastoma cell line neuro2a (N2a)...
January 2018: Cell Transplantation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29562513/brain-aging-and-late-onset-alzheimer-s-disease-a-matter-of-increased-amyloid-or-reduced-energy
#20
Patrizia Mecocci, Marta Baroni, Umberto Senin, Virginia Boccardi
Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents the most common form of dementia in old age subjects, and despite decades of studies, the underlying etiopathogenetic mechanisms remain unsolved. The definition of AD has changed over the past years, offering an ever more detailed definition of pre-morbid and pre-clinical status, but without a similar strong emphasis on the role of aging as the main risk factor. In fact, while early-onset AD is a clear consequence of gene mutations, late-onset AD is more likely due to a gradual accumulation of age-related damages...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
keyword
keyword
32554
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"