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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811887/lessons-from-the-t%C3%A5-hoku-tsunami-a-model-for-island-avifauna-conservation-prioritization
#1
Michelle H Reynolds, Paul Berkowitz, John L Klavitter, Karen N Courtot
Earthquake-generated tsunamis threaten coastal areas and low-lying islands with sudden flooding. Although human hazards and infrastructure damage have been well documented for tsunamis in recent decades, the effects on wildlife communities rarely have been quantified. We describe a tsunami that hit the world's largest remaining tropical seabird rookery and estimate the effects of sudden flooding on 23 bird species nesting on Pacific islands more than 3,800 km from the epicenter. We used global positioning systems, tide gauge data, and satellite imagery to quantify characteristics of the Tōhoku earthquake-generated tsunami (11 March 2011) and its inundation extent across four Hawaiian Islands...
August 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807621/antitoxin-therapy-of-natural-avian-botulism-outbreaks-occurred-in-brazil
#2
Rodrigo O S Silva, Sandra Y M Gómez, Lilian B Medeiros, Marcus V R Marques, Aila S G Silva, Elisabeth N Mureb, Carlos A Oliveira Junior, Samantha M Favoretto, Francisco C F Lobato, Nelson R S Martins
Botulism commonly affects water birds and it has recently been observed to be emerging in poultry production. In the present work, outbreaks of botulism in wild native species, such as the black-fronted Piping-guan (Aburria jacutinga), wild duck (Cairina moschata) and its crosses with mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) are described. Following treatments with a commercial botulism antitoxin CD, 28 (96.5%) out of 29 animals fully recovered after 24-72 h. The antitoxin therapy was shown to be a useful option for the treatment of affected birds, including those that were severely affected...
August 12, 2017: Anaerobe
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802703/identification-and-characterization-of-clostridium-botulinum-group-iii-field-strains-by-matrix-assisted-laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry-maldi-tof-ms
#3
Luca Bano, Ilenia Drigo, Elena Tonon, Simone Pascoletti, Cinzia Puiatti, Fabrizio Anniballi, Bruna Auricchio, Florigio Lista, Cesare Montecucco, Fabrizio Agnoletti
Animal botulism is primarily due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types C, D or their chimeric variants C/D or D/C, produced by Clostridium botulinum group III, which appears to include the genetically indistinguishable Clostridium haemolyticum and Clostridium novyi. In the present study, we used matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) to identify and characterize 81 BoNT-producing Clostridia isolated in 47 episodes of animal botulism. The instrument's default database, containing no entries for Clostridium botulinum, permitted reliable identification of 26 strains at the genus level...
August 9, 2017: Anaerobe
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800600/botulinum-neurotoxin-c-mutants-reveal-different-effects-of-syntaxin-or-snap-25-proteolysis-on-neuromuscular-transmission
#4
Giulia Zanetti, Stefan Sikorra, Andreas Rummel, Nadja Krez, Elisa Duregotti, Samuele Negro, Tina Henke, Ornella Rossetto, Thomas Binz, Marco Pirazzini
Botulinum neurotoxin serotype C (BoNT/C) is a neuroparalytic toxin associated with outbreaks of animal botulism, particularly in birds, and is the only BoNT known to cleave two different SNARE proteins, SNAP-25 and syntaxin. BoNT/C was shown to be a good substitute for BoNT/A1 in human dystonia therapy because of its long lasting effects and absence of neuromuscular damage. Two triple mutants of BoNT/C, namely BoNT/C S51T/R52N/N53P (BoNT/C α-51) and BoNT/C L200W/M221W/I226W (BoNT/C α-3W), were recently reported to selectively cleave syntaxin and have been used here to evaluate the individual contribution of SNAP-25 and syntaxin cleavage to the effect of BoNT/C in vivo...
August 11, 2017: PLoS Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28785006/a-camelid-single-domain-antibody-neutralizes-botulinum-neurotoxin-a-by-blocking-host-receptor-binding
#5
Guorui Yao, Kwok-Ho Lam, Jasmin Weisemann, Lisheng Peng, Nadja Krez, Kay Perry, Charles B Shoemaker, Min Dong, Andreas Rummel, Rongsheng Jin
Antibody treatment is currently the only available countermeasure for botulism, a fatal illness caused by flaccid paralysis of muscles due to botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) intoxication. Among the seven major serotypes of BoNT/A-G, BoNT/A poses the most serious threat to humans because of its high potency and long duration of action. Prior to entering neurons and blocking neurotransmitter release, BoNT/A recognizes motoneurons via a dual-receptor binding process in which it engages both the neuron surface polysialoganglioside (PSG) and synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2)...
August 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28783115/a-novel-surface-plasmon-resonance-biosensor-for-the-rapid-detection-of-botulinum-neurotoxins
#6
Kruti Patel, Shmuel Halevi, Paul Melman, John Schwartz, Shuowei Cai, Bal Ram Singh
Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are Category A agents on the NIAID (National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) priority pathogen list owing to their extreme toxicity and the relative ease of production. These deadly toxins, in minute quantities (estimated human i.v. lethal dose LD50 of 1-2 ng/kg body weight), cause fatal flaccid paralysis by blocking neurotransmitter release. The current gold standard detection method, the mouse-bioassay, often takes days to confirm botulism. Furthermore, there are no effective antidotes known to reverse the symptoms of botulism, and as a result, patients with severe botulism often require meticulous care during the prolonged paralytic illness...
August 7, 2017: Biosensors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28765793/infant-botulism-in-the-very-young-neonate-a-case-series
#7
Laura Jackson, Suneeta Madan-Khetarpal, Monica Naik, Marian G Michaels, Melissa Riley
Background  Though botulism is a rare disease overall, all infants younger than 1 year of age are at risk of contracting infant botulism, the most prevalent form reported in the United States. Nonetheless, infant botulism is frequently omitted from the differential diagnosis of the very young neonate exclusively due to age, and the diagnosis is often only considered secondarily after a costly and prolonged work up is undertaken. Delayed diagnosis can lead not only to unnecessary testing but also to prolonged hospital stay and increased morbidity...
July 2017: American Journal of Perinatology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28742188/sp%C3%A3-dbarnsbotulism-%C3%A2-sk%C3%A3-l-att-inte-ge-honung-till-barn-under-ett-%C3%A3-r
#8
Sverre Wikström, Elisabet Holst
Infant botulism - why honey should be avoided for children up to one year Infant botulism means that Clostridium botulinum colonize and produce toxin in the infant gut, usually during the first year of life. Illness severity varies widely and the incidence may be under-estimated. Infant botulism should be considered in cases of acute muscle weakness or floppiness in infants, especially when accompanied by constipation or feeding difficulties. Respiratory failure and need for mechanical ventilation is common, but full recovery is gradually obtained...
July 24, 2017: Läkartidningen
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733282/differentiating-botulinum-neurotoxin-producing-clostridia-with-a-simple-multiplex-pcr-assay
#9
Charles H D Williamson, Adam J Vazquez, Karen Hill, Theresa J Smith, Roxanne Nottingham, Nathan E Stone, Colin J Sobek, Jill H Cocking, Rafael A Fernández, Patricia A Caballero, Owen P Leiser, Paul Keim, Jason W Sahl
Diverse members of the genus clostridium produce botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), which cause a flaccid paralysis known as botulism. While multiple species of clostridia produce BoNTs, the majority of human botulism cases have been attributed to Clostridium botulinum Groups I and II. Recent comparative genomic studies have demonstrated the genomic diversity within these BoNT-producing species. This study introduces a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for differentiating members of C. botulinum Group I, C...
July 21, 2017: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28730326/infectious-diseases-causing-autonomic-dysfunction
#10
REVIEW
Francisco Javier Carod Artal
OBJECTIVES: To review infectious diseases that may cause autonomic dysfunction. METHODS: Review of published papers indexed in medline/embase. RESULTS: Autonomic dysfunction has been reported in retrovirus (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), human T-lymphotropic virus), herpes viruses, flavivirus, enterovirus 71 and lyssavirus infections. Autonomic dysfunction is relatively common in HIV-infected patients and heart rate variability is reduced even in early stages of infection...
July 20, 2017: Clinical Autonomic Research: Official Journal of the Clinical Autonomic Research Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28729852/towards-better-understanding-of-the-pathogenesis-of-neuronal-respiratory-network-in-sudden-perinatal-death
#11
REVIEW
Riffat Mehboob, Mahvish Kabir, Naseer Ahmed, Fridoon Jawad Ahmad
Sudden perinatal death that includes the victims of sudden infant death syndrome, sudden intrauterine death syndrome, and stillbirth are heartbreaking events in the life of parents. Most of the studies about sudden perinatal death were reported from Italy, highlighting two main etiological factors: prone sleeping position and smoking. Other probable contributory factors are prematurity, male gender, lack of breastfeeding, respiratory tract infections, use of pacifiers, infant botulism, extensive use of pesticides and insecticides, etc...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28729254/finished-whole-genome-sequences-of-clostridium-butyricum-toxin-subtype-e4-and-clostridium-baratii-toxin-subtype-f7-strains
#12
Jessica L Halpin, Karen Hill, Shannon L Johnson, David Carlton Bruce, T Brian Shirey, Janet K Dykes, Carolina Lúquez
Clostridium butyricum and Clostridium baratii species have been known to produce botulinum toxin types E and F, respectively, which can cause botulism, a rare but serious neuroparalytic disease. Here, we present finished genome sequences for two of these clinically relevant strains.
July 20, 2017: Genome Announcements
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28726719/sima-cells-for-a-serotype-specific-and-sensitive-cell-based-neutralization-test-for-botulinum-toxin-a-and-e
#13
Nicola Bak, Shalini Rajagopal, Paul Stickings, Dorothea Sesardic
Botulinum toxins (BoNTs), of which there are seven serotypes, are among the most potent neurotoxins, with serotypes A, B and E causing human botulism. Antitoxins form the first line of treatment for botulism, and functional, highly sensitive in vitro methods for toxin neutralization are needed to replace the current in vivo methods used for determination of antitoxin potency. In this preliminary proof of concept study, we report the development of a neutralization test using the neuroblastoma SiMa cell line...
July 20, 2017: Toxins
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28705271/molecular-and-epidemiological-characterization-of-infant-botulism-in-beijing-china
#14
Yin Ping Dong, Wei Wang, Tao Jiang, Jin Xu, Chun Hui Han, Shao Fei Yan, Séamus Fanning, Ying Li, Xiao Chen Ma, Di Zhang, Yao Zhao, Biao Zeng, Feng Qin Li
Laboratory-based pathogen isolation, identification, and toxicity determination were performed on samples from a suspected case of infant botulism. Mice injected with cultures generated from the enema sample and ingested Powered infant formula (PIF) presented typical signs of botulism. Antitoxins to polyvalent botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and monovalent BoNT type B antitoxin had protective effects. Clostridium botulinum isolated from the enema and residual PIF samples were positive for type B toxin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed that the two strains of C...
June 2017: Biomedical and Environmental Sciences: BES
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28698055/small-molecule-metalloprotease-inhibitor-with-in%C3%A2-vitro-ex%C3%A2-vivo-and-in%C3%A2-vivo-efficacy-against-botulinum-neurotoxin-serotype-a
#15
Alan R Jacobson, Michael Adler, Nicholas R Silvaggi, Karen N Allen, Genessa M Smith, Ross A Fredenburg, Ross L Stein, Jong-Beak Park, Xiaochuan Feng, Charles B Shoemaker, Sharad S Deshpande, Michael C Goodnough, Carl J Malizio, Eric A Johnson, Sabine Pellett, William H Tepp, Saul Tzipori
Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most toxic substances known to mankind and are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism. Their ease of production and extreme toxicity have caused these neurotoxins to be classified as Tier 1 bioterrorist threat agents and have led to a sustained effort to develop countermeasures to treat intoxication in case of a bioterrorist attack. While timely administration of an approved antitoxin is effective in reducing the severity of botulism, reversing intoxication requires different strategies...
July 8, 2017: Toxicon: Official Journal of the International Society on Toxinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28692343/pulsotype-diversity-of-clostridium-botulinum-strains-containing-serotypes-a-and-or-b-genes
#16
Jessica L Halpin, Lavin Joseph, Janet K Dykes, Loretta McCroskey, Elise Smith, Denise Toney, Steven Stroika, Kelley Hise, Susan Maslanka, Carolina Lúquez
Clostridium botulinum strains are prevalent in the environment and produce a potent neurotoxin that causes botulism, a rare but serious paralytic disease. In 2010, a national PulseNet database was established to curate C. botulinum pulsotypes and facilitate epidemiological investigations, particularly for serotypes A and B strains frequently associated with botulism cases in the United States. Between 2010 and 2014 we performed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using a PulseNet protocol, uploaded the resulting PFGE patterns into a national database, and analyzed data according to PulseNet criteria (UPGMA clustering, Dice coefficient, 1...
July 10, 2017: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28667140/recognising-clinical-avian-botulism-in-wild-waterbirds
#17
(no author information available yet)
This article has been prepared by Paul Duff and colleagues of the APHA Wildlife Expert Group.
July 1, 2017: Veterinary Record
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28667139/disease-surveillance-in-england-and-wales-june-2017
#18
(no author information available yet)
Current and emerging issues: update on Schmallenberg virusHighlights from the scanning surveillance networkUpdate on international disease threatsFocus on recognising clinical avian botulism in wild waterbirdsThese are among matters discussed in the Animal and Plant Health Agency's (APHA's) disease surveillance report for June 2017.
July 1, 2017: Veterinary Record
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28661393/botulism-in-italy-1986-to-2015
#19
Fabrizio Anniballi, Bruna Auricchio, Alfonsina Fiore, Davide Lonati, Carlo Alessandro Locatelli, Florigio Lista, Silvia Fillo, Giuseppina Mandarino, Dario De Medici
Botulism is a rare but severe neuroparalytic disease caused by botulinum toxins. Because of its high potential impact on public health, botulism is a closely monitored communicable disease in Europe. In Italy, which has one of the highest incidence rates in Europe (0.03 cases per 100,000 population), botulism is monitored through a case-based passive surveillance system: the front-line physician who diagnoses a suspected case must notify the Local Health Units immediately, and the Ministry of Health's office within 12 hours...
June 15, 2017: Euro Surveillance: Bulletin Européen sur les Maladies Transmissibles, European Communicable Disease Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28617306/characterization-of-hemagglutinin-negative-botulinum-progenitor-toxins
#20
Suzanne R Kalb, Jakub Baudys, Theresa J Smith, Leonard A Smith, John R Barr
Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC), alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs) to cause hemagglutination...
June 15, 2017: Toxins
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