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Organic brain

Aline Sarturi Ponte, Elenir Fedosse
This study correlated the impact of Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) on the labor activity of individuals of working age on their quality of life (QOL) and that of their relatives/caregivers. It involved qualitative (content analysis) and quantitative (descriptive) research. Forty-eight individuals with ABI and 27 relatives/caregivers were interviewed. The correlation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life WHOQOL-BREF (52...
October 2016: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
Susanne Falkner, Sofia Grade, Leda Dimou, Karl-Klaus Conzelmann, Tobias Bonhoeffer, Magdalena Götz, Mark Hübener
The ability of the adult mammalian brain to compensate for neuronal loss caused by injury or disease is very limited. Transplantation aims to replace lost neurons, but the extent to which new neurons can integrate into existing circuits is unknown. Here, using chronic in vivo two-photon imaging, we show that embryonic neurons transplanted into the visual cortex of adult mice mature into bona fide pyramidal cells with selective pruning of basal dendrites, achieving adult-like densities of dendritic spines and axonal boutons within 4-8 weeks...
October 26, 2016: Nature
Elie El Agha, Werner Seeger, Saverio Bellusci
Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) constitute a large family of polypeptides that are involved in many biological processes, ranging from prenatal cell-fate specification and organogenesis to hormonal and metabolic regulation in postnatal life. During embryonic development, these growth factors are important mediators of the crosstalk among ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm-derived cells and they instruct the spatial and temporal growth of organs and tissues such as the brain, bone, lung, gut etc. The involvement of FGFs in postnatal lung homeostasis is a growing field and there is emerging literature about their roles in lung pathophysiology...
October 26, 2016: Developmental Dynamics: An Official Publication of the American Association of Anatomists
Humberto Rocha, Joana Dias, Tiago Ventura, Brígida Ferreira, Maria do Carmo Lopes
PURPOSE: The inverse planning of an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment requires decisions regarding the angles used for radiation incidence, even when arcs are used. The possibility of improving the quality of treatment plans by an optimized selection of the beam angle incidences-beam angle optimization (BAO)-is seldom done in clinical practice. The inclusion of noncoplanar beam incidences in an automated optimization routine is even more unusual. However, for some tumor sites, the advantage of considering noncoplanar beam incidences is well known...
October 2016: Medical Physics
Morgan C Lyon, Arkadiusz Sitek, Scott D Metzler, Stephen C Moore
PURPOSE: The authors are currently developing a dual-resolution multiple-pinhole microSPECT imaging system based on three large NaI(Tl) gamma cameras. Two multiple-pinhole tungsten collimator tubes will be used sequentially for whole-body "scout" imaging of a mouse, followed by high-resolution (hi-res) imaging of an organ of interest, such as the heart or brain. Ideally, the whole-body image will be reconstructed in real time such that data need only be acquired until the area of interest can be visualized well-enough to determine positioning for the hi-res scan...
October 2016: Medical Physics
Takeshi Uemura, Takuma Mori, Taiga Kurihara, Shiori Kawase, Rie Koike, Michiru Satoga, Xueshan Cao, Xue Li, Toru Yanagawa, Takayuki Sakurai, Takayuki Shindo, Katsuhiko Tabuchi
Genome editing is a powerful technique for studying gene functions. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-in has recently been applied to various cells and organisms. Here, we successfully knocked in an EGFP coding sequence at the site immediately after the first ATG codon of the β-actin gene in neurons in the brain by the combined use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation technique, resulting in the expression of the EGFP-tagged β-actin protein in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We detected EGFP fluorescence signals in the soma and neurites of EGFP knock-in neurons...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Young Bin Ji, Seung Jae Oh, Seok-Gu Kang, Jung Heo, Sang-Hoon Kim, Yuna Choi, Seungri Song, Hye Young Son, Se Hoon Kim, Ji Hyun Lee, Seung Joo Haam, Yong Min Huh, Jong Hee Chang, Chulmin Joo, Jin-Suck Suh
Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas...
October 26, 2016: Scientific Reports
Hang Ruan, Zhixi Su, Xun Gu
Recent innovation of RNA-seq technology has shed insightful light on the transcriptomic evolution studies, especially on researches of tissue-specific expression evolution. Phylogenetic analysis of transcriptome data may help to identify causal gene expression differences underlying the evolutionary changes in morphological, physiological, and developmental characters of interest. However, there is a deficiency of software to phylogenetically analyze transcriptome data. To address this need, we have developed an R package TreeExp that can perform comparative expression evolution analysis based on RNA-seq data, which includes optimized input formatting, normalization, pairwise expression distance estimation, expression character tree inference, and preliminary expression phylogenetic network analysis...
October 26, 2016: Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part B, Molecular and Developmental Evolution
J Man, J C Hutchinson, M Ashworth, I Jeffrey, A E Heazell, N J Sebire
OBJECTIVES: The postmortem fetal brain:liver weight ratio is commonly used as a marker of nutrition for diagnosis of fetal growth restriction (FGR). However, there are limited data regarding the effects of intrauterine retention, fetal maceration and postmortem interval on organ weights and their ratios at autopsy. Our aims were to examine the relationships between gestational-age-adjusted and sex-adjusted fetal organ weights at autopsy, cause of intrauterine death and effects of intrauterine retention, and to determine whether the brain:liver weight ratio is a reliable marker of FGR in intrauterine death...
October 25, 2016: Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
J Man, J C Hutchinson, M Ashworth, L Judge-Kronis, S Levine, N J Sebire
OBJECTIVES: Guidelines for the investigation of intrauterine death and sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) recommend, based on expert opinion, autopsy procedures and tissue sampling strategies for histological analysis. Although stillbirth is much more common than SUDI, there have been no large-scale studies published which evaluate the usefulness of histological evaluation of specific organs in stillbirth for determining cause of death. Our aim was to evaluate the use of macroscopic and microscopic assessment of internal organs to determine cause of intrauterine death...
October 25, 2016: Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Qiang Li, Yong Xiao, Yinghui Li, Lei Li, Na Lu, Zhi Xu, Xiaodong Mou, Shenqin Mao, Wei Wang, Yonggui Yuan
INTRODUCTION: Somatic symptom disorder (SSD) is an illness that occurs over a long time and results in significant disruption in daily life. Clinically, SSD patients typically express complaints that involve a variety of organ systems. However, the neural mechanism of SSD remains poorly understood. METHODS: Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated the characteristics of the regional basal brain function during resting state in patients with SSD...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
Alexander G Huth, Tyler Lee, Shinji Nishimoto, Natalia Y Bilenko, An T Vu, Jack L Gallant
One crucial test for any quantitative model of the brain is to show that the model can be used to accurately decode information from evoked brain activity. Several recent neuroimaging studies have decoded the structure or semantic content of static visual images from human brain activity. Here we present a decoding algorithm that makes it possible to decode detailed information about the object and action categories present in natural movies from human brain activity signals measured by functional MRI. Decoding is accomplished using a hierarchical logistic regression (HLR) model that is based on labels that were manually assigned from the WordNet semantic taxonomy...
2016: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Elena Parrini, Valerio Conti, William B Dobyns, Renzo Guerrini
Malformations of cortical development (MCD) represent a major cause of developmental disabilities, severe epilepsy, and reproductive disadvantage. Genes that have been associated to MCD are mainly involved in cell proliferation and specification, neuronal migration, and late cortical organization. Lissencephaly-pachygyria-severe band heterotopia are diffuse neuronal migration disorders causing severe global neurological impairment. Abnormalities of the LIS1, DCX, ARX, RELN, VLDLR, ACTB, ACTG1, TUBG1, KIF5C, KIF2A, and CDK5 genes have been associated with these malformations...
September 2016: Molecular Syndromology
Ashok Jangra, Chandra Shaker Sriram, Suryanarayan Pandey, Priyansha Choubey, Prabha Rajput, Babita Saroha, Babul Kumar Bezbaruah, Mangala Lahkar
Acute and chronic alcohol exposure evidently influences epigenetic changes, both transiently and permanently, and these changes in turn influence a variety of cells and organ systems throughout the body. Many of the alcohol-induced epigenetic modifications can contribute to cellular adaptations that ultimately lead to behavioral tolerance and alcohol dependence. The persistence of behavioral changes demonstrates that long-lasting changes in gene expression, within particular regions of the brain, may contribute importantly to the addiction phenotype...
October 2016: Annals of Neurosciences
Ian Gopal Gould, Philbert Tsai, David Kleinfeld, Andreas Linninger
The cortical angioarchitecture is a key factor in controlling cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism. Difficulties in imaging the complex microanatomy of the cortex have so far restricted insight about blood flow distribution in the microcirculation. A new methodology combining advanced microscopy data with large scale hemodynamic simulations enabled us to quantify the effect of the angioarchitecture on the cerebral microcirculation. High-resolution images of the mouse primary somatosensory cortex were input into with a comprehensive computational model of cerebral perfusion and oxygen supply ranging from the pial vessels to individual brain cells...
October 10, 2016: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Julie Bergeron, Noha Gerges, Clémence Guiraut, Djordje Grbic, Marie-Julie Allard, Louis-Charles Fortier, Cathy Vaillancourt, Guillaume Sébire
Infection or inflammation during pregnancy is known to lead to maternal immune activation triggering a fetal inflammatory response syndrome associated with deleterious effects, such as brain injury and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) - one of the most common bacterium colonizing pregnant women - can be responsible for chorioamnionitis. Given that interleukin (IL)-1β has a major role in anti-GBS host defense, we hypothesized that IL-1β-driven innate immune response is implicated in GBS-induced chorioamnionitis...
November 2016: Placenta
Sónia Puga, Patrícia Pereira, Filipa Pinto-Ribeiro, Nelson J O'Driscoll, Erin Mann, Marisa Barata, Pedro Pousão-Ferreira, João Canário, Armando Almeida, Mário Pacheco
The current study aims to shed light on the neurotoxicity of MeHg in fish (white seabream - Diplodus sargus) by the combined assessment of: (i) MeHg toxicokinetics in the brain, (ii) brain morphometry (volume and number of neurons plus glial cells in specific brain regions) and (iii) fish swimming behavior (endpoints associated with the motor performance and the fear/anxiety-like status). Fish were surveyed for all the components after 7 (E7) and 14 (E14) days of dietary exposure to MeHg (8.7μgg(-1)), as well as after a post-exposure period of 28days (PE28)...
October 17, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Kit D Longden
Color is famous for not existing in the external world: our brains create the perception of color from the spatial and temporal patterns of the wavelength and intensity of light. For an intangible quality, we have detailed knowledge of its origins and consequences. Much is known about the organization and evolution of the first phases of color processing, the filtering of light in the eye and processing in the retina, and about the final phases, the roles of color in behavior and natural selection. To understand how color processing in the central brain has evolved, we need well-defined pathways or circuitry where we can gauge how color contributes to the computations involved in specific behaviors...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
William J Joiner
Despite decades of intense study, the functions of sleep are still shrouded in mystery. The difficulty in understanding these functions can be at least partly attributed to the varied manifestations of sleep in different animals. Daily sleep duration can range from 4-20 hrs among mammals, and sleep can manifest throughout the brain, or it can alternate over time between cerebral hemispheres, depending on the species. Ecological factors are likely to have shaped these and other sleep behaviors during evolution by altering the properties of conserved arousal circuits in the brain...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Daniel M Bear, Jean-Marc Lassance, Hopi E Hoekstra, Sandeep Robert Datta
Evolution sculpts the olfactory nervous system in response to the unique sensory challenges facing each species. In vertebrates, dramatic and diverse adaptations to the chemical environment are possible because of the hierarchical structure of the olfactory receptor (OR) gene superfamily: expansion or contraction of OR subfamilies accompanies major changes in habitat and lifestyle; independent selection on OR subfamilies can permit local adaptation or conserved chemical communication; and genetic variation in single OR genes can alter odor percepts and behaviors driven by precise chemical cues...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
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