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neurotransmitter deficiency

Aneeqa Noor, Saadia Zahid
Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP-25) is one of the key proteins involved in formation of neural soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes, which are responsible for the calcium-dependent exocytosis of neurotransmitters - a major step in neurotransmission and the key to normal functioning of brain. Several studies have reported abnormalities in its expression and structure and highlighted it as an important player in pathology of various neurological disorders like Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, attention deficient hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy and few others...
October 13, 2016: International Journal of Neuroscience
Yilmaz Yildiz, Emine Pektas, Aysegul Tokatli, Goknur Haliloglu
Hereditary dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (DTDS) is a neurotransmitter disorder caused by a defect in the neuronal uptake of dopamine. To date, 20 patients are reported in the literature, and we present 2 additional patients with DTDS harboring novel homozygous SLC6A3 gene mutations. Patient A is an 8-month-old male with neonatal-onset hypotonia, who developed orolingual dyskinetic movements and oculogyric crises after 4 months of age, with evolution to status dystonicus episodes. Patient B is a 4-year-old male who also had hypotonia since birth, with additional severe limb contractions and oculogyric crises after the age of 3 months, with a misdiagnosis of epileptic encephalopathy...
September 30, 2016: Neuropediatrics
Hanan E Shamseldin, Ikuo Masuho, Ahmed Alenizi, Suad Alyamani, Dipak N Patil, Niema Ibrahim, Kirill A Martemyanov, Fowzan S Alkuraya
BACKGROUND: Neuropsychiatric disorders are common forms of disability in humans. Despite recent progress in deciphering the genetics of these disorders, their phenotypic complexity continues to be a major challenge. Mendelian neuropsychiatric disorders are rare but their study has the potential to unravel novel mechanisms that are relevant to their complex counterparts. RESULTS: In an extended consanguineous family, we identified a novel neuropsychiatric phenotype characterized by severe speech impairment, variable expressivity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and motor delay...
September 27, 2016: Genome Biology
M Katharina Grauel, Marta Maglione, Suneel Reddy-Alla, Claudia G Willmes, Marisa M Brockmann, Thorsten Trimbuch, Tanja Rosenmund, Maria Pangalos, Gülçin Vardar, Alexander Stumpf, Alexander M Walter, Benjamin R Rost, Britta J Eickholt, Volker Haucke, Dietmar Schmitz, Stephan J Sigrist, Christian Rosenmund
The tight spatial coupling of synaptic vesicles and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaVs) ensures efficient action potential-triggered neurotransmitter release from presynaptic active zones (AZs). Rab-interacting molecule-binding proteins (RIM-BPs) interact with Ca(2+) channels and via RIM with other components of the release machinery. Although human RIM-BPs have been implicated in autism spectrum disorders, little is known about the role of mammalian RIM-BPs in synaptic transmission. We investigated RIM-BP2-deficient murine hippocampal neurons in cultures and slices...
October 11, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Panayotis K Thanos, Jianmin Zhuo, Lisa Robison, Ronald Kim, Mala Ananth, Ilon Choai, Adam Grunseich, Nicola M Grissom, Robert George, Foteini Delis, Teresa M Reyes
Birthweight is a marker for suboptimal fetal growth and development in utero. Offspring can be born large for gestational age (LGA), which is linked to maternal obesity or excessive gestational weight gain, as well as small for gestational age (SGA), arising from nutrient or calorie deficiency, placental dysfunction, or other maternal conditions (hypertension, infection). In humans, LGA and SGA babies are at an increased risk for certain neurodevelopmental disorders, including Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, schizophrenia, and social and mood disorders...
September 22, 2016: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Ni-Chung Lee, Yu-May Lee, Pin-Wen Chen, Barry J Byrne, Wuh-Liang Hwu
Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inborn error of monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis, which results in dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, and norepinephrine deficiencies. The DDC gene founder mutation IVS6+4A>T is highly prevalent in Chinese patients with AADC deficiency. In this study, we designed several U1 snRNA vectors to adapt U1 snRNA binding sequences of the mutated DDC gene. We found that only the modified U1 snRNA (IVS-AAA) that completely matched both the intronic and exonic U1 binding sequences of the mutated DDC gene could correct splicing errors of either the mutated human DDC minigene or the mouse artificial splicing construct in vitro We further injected an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to express IVS-AAA in the brain of a knock-in mouse model...
September 21, 2016: Human Molecular Genetics
A Kassir
BACKGROUND: Iron plays an essential role in balancing the various metabolism in the body. It is also involved in the synthesis of several neurotransmitters. Nutritional iron deficiency is one of the most widespread worldwide; it poses a great health challenge due to the consequences it entails. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this research study is to explore the percentage of psychiatric patients who have a deficiency in iron. In addition, the study investigates the efficacy of iron administered by oral treatment on psychiatric symptomatology among iron deficient patients...
September 16, 2016: L'Encéphale
Oscar Brenes, Valentina Carabelli, Sara Gosso, Adarli Romero, Emilio Carbone, Pier Giorgio Montarolo, Mirella Ghirardi
Synapsins are a family of presynaptic proteins related to several processes of synaptic functioning. A variety of reports have linked mutations in synapsin genes with the development of epilepsy. Among the proposed mechanisms, a main one is based on the synapsin-mediated imbalance towards network hyperexcitability due to differential effects on neurotransmitter release in GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses. Along this line, a non-synaptic effect of synapsin depletion increasing neuronal excitability has recently been described in Helix neurons...
September 6, 2016: Epilepsy Research
Nadav I Weinstock, Lawrence Wrabetz, M Laura Feltri, Daesung Shin
Krabbe disease (KD) is caused by mutations in the galactosylceramidase (GALC) gene, which encodes a lysosomal enzyme that degrades galactolipids, including galactosylceramide and galactosylsphingosine (psychosine). GALC deficiency results in progressive intracellular accumulation of psychosine, which is believed to be the main cause for the demyelinating neurodegeneration in KD pathology. Umbilical cord blood transplantation slows disease progression when performed presymptomatically but carries a significant risk of morbidity and mortality...
November 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
M Vázquez-Gómez, D Valent, C García-Contreras, L Arroyo, C Óvilo, B Isabel, A Bassols, A González-Bulnes
The current study aimed to determine, using a swine model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), whether short- and long-term neurological deficiencies and interactive dysfunctions of Low Birth-Weight (LBW) offspring might be related to altered pattern of neurotransmitters. Hence, we compared the quantities of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines), which were determined by HPLC, at brain structures related to the limbic system (hippocampus and amygdala) in 14 LBW and 10 Normal Body-Weight (NBW) newborn piglets...
September 9, 2016: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Natalie Connor-Robson, Owen M Peters, Steven Millership, Natalia Ninkina, Vladimir L Buchman
Synucleins are involved in multiple steps of the neurotransmitter turnover, but the largely normal synaptic function in young adult animals completely lacking synucleins suggests their roles are dispensable for execution of these processes. Instead, they may be utilized for boosting the efficiency of certain molecular mechanisms in presynaptic terminals, with a deficiency of synuclein proteins sensitizing to or exacerbating synaptic malfunction caused by accumulation of mild alterations, which are commonly associated with aging...
October 2016: Neurobiology of Aging
Saw Simeon, Nuttapat Anuwongcharoen, Watshara Shoombuatong, Aijaz Ahmad Malik, Virapong Prachayasittikul, Jarl E S Wikberg, Chanin Nantasenamat
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease which leads to the gradual loss of neuronal cells. Several hypotheses for AD exists (e.g., cholinergic, amyloid, tau hypotheses, etc.). As per the cholinergic hypothesis, the deficiency of choline is responsible for AD; therefore, the inhibition of AChE is a lucrative therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine that is essential for cognition and memory...
2016: PeerJ
Eileen Rodriguez-Tapia, Alberto Perez-Medina, Xiaochun Bian, James J Galligan
Enteric inhibitory motorneurons use nitric oxide (NO) and a purine neurotransmitter to relax gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Enteric P/Q type Ca(2+) channels contribute to excitatory neuromuscular transmission; their contribution to inhibitory transmission is less clear. We used the colon from tottering mice (tg/tg, loss of function mutation in the α1A pore-forming subunit of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels) to test the hypothesis that P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels contribute to inhibitory neuromuscular transmission and colonic propulsive motility...
September 1, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Francesco Porta, Alberto Ponzone, Marco Spada
Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) deficiencies are inherited neuro-metabolic disorders leading to monoamine neurotransmitters deficiency. An individualized replacement therapy with neurotransmitters precursors is necessary to restore dopaminergic and serotoninergic homeostasis. The correction of dopaminergic tone is complicated, like in Parkinson disease, by l-dopa short half-life and adverse effects. To improve this picture, since 2009 we introduced the non-ergot dopamine agonist pramipexole as an adjunct to l-dopa therapy in the treatment of the most common causes of BH4 deficiency, 6-pyruvoyl tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS) deficiency and dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) deficiency...
November 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology: EJPN
Phillip L Pearl
Vitamin-dependent epilepsies and multiple metabolic epilepsies are amenable to treatment that markedly improves the disease course. Knowledge of these amenably treatable severe pediatric epilepsies allows for early identification, testing, and treatment. These disorders present with various phenotypes, including early onset epileptic encephalopathy (refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, and early infantile epileptic encephalopathy), infantile spasms, or mixed generalized seizure types in infancy, childhood, or even adolescence and adulthood...
May 2016: Seminars in Pediatric Neurology
Hongen Wei, Yuehong Ma, Caiyun Ding, Guorong Jin, Jianrong Liu, Qiaoqiao Chang, Fengyun Hu, Li Yu
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a developmental disorder characterized by impairments in social and communication abilities, as well as by restricted and repetitive behaviors. The BTBR T (+) Itpr3 (tf) (BTBR) mice have emerged as a well characterized and widely used mouse model of a range of ASD-like phenotype, showing deficiencies in social behaviors and unusual ultrasonic vocalizations as well as increased repetitive self-grooming. However, the inherited neurobiological changes that lead to ASD-like behaviors in these mice are incompletely known and still under active investigation...
August 19, 2016: Neurochemical Research
Tamara L Doremus-Fitzwater, Linda P Spear
Adolescence is an evolutionarily conserved developmental period, with neural circuits and behaviors contributing to the detection, procurement, and receipt of rewards bearing similarity across species. Studies with laboratory animals suggest that adolescence is typified by a "reward-centric" phenotype-an increased sensitivity to rewards relative to adults. In contrast, adolescent rodents are reportedly less sensitive to the aversive properties of many drugs and naturally aversive stimuli. Alterations within the mesocorticolimbic dopamine and endocannabinoid systems likely contribute to an adolescent reward-sensitive, yet aversion-resistant, phenotype...
August 11, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Lisa A Pan, Petra Martin, Thomas Zimmer, Anna Maria Segreti, Sivan Kassiff, Brian W McKain, Cynthia A Baca, Manivel Rengasamy, Keith Hyland, Nicolette Walano, Robert Steinfeld, Marion Hughes, Steven K Dobrowolski, Michele Pasquino, Rasim Diler, James Perel, David N Finegold, David G Peters, Robert K Naviaux, David A Brent, Jerry Vockley
OBJECTIVE: Treatment-refractory depression is a devastating condition with significant morbidity, mortality, and societal cost. At least 15% of cases of major depressive disorder remain refractory to treatment. The authors previously identified a young adult with treatment-refractory depression and multiple suicide attempts with an associated severe deficiency of CSF tetrahydrobiopterin, a critical cofactor for monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis. Treatment with sapropterin, a tetrahydrobiopterin analogue, led to dramatic and long-lasting remission of depression...
August 13, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Kelly M Lohr, Shababa T Masoud, Ali Salahpour, Gary W Miller
Dopamine was first identified as a neurotransmitter localized to the midbrain over 50 years ago. The dopamine transporter (DAT; SLC6A3) and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2) are two regulators of dopamine homeostasis in the presynaptic neuron. DAT transports dopamine from the extracellular space into the cytosol of the presynaptic terminal. VMAT2 then packages this cytosolic dopamine into vesicular compartments for subsequent release upon neurotransmission. Thus, DAT and VMAT2 act in concert to move transmitter efficiently throughout the neuron...
August 13, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
S C Gominak
STUDY OBJECTIVES: Vitamin D blood levels of 60-80ng/ml promote normal sleep. The present study was undertaken to explore why this beneficial effect waned after 2years as arthritic pain increased. Pantothenic acid becomes coenzyme A, a cofactor necessary for cortisol and acetylcholine production. 1950s experiments suggested a connection between pantothenic acid deficiency, autoimmune arthritis and insomnia. The B vitamins have been shown to have an intestinal bacterial source and a food source, suggesting that the normal intestinal microbiome may have always been the primary source of B vitamins...
September 2016: Medical Hypotheses
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