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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28344692/a-landscape-analysis-of-leadership-training-in-postgraduate-medical-education-training-programs-at-the-university-of-ottawa
#1
Marlon Danilewitz, Laurie McLean
BACKGROUND: There is growing recognition of the importance of physician leadership in healthcare. At the same time, becoming an effective leader requires significant training. While educational opportunities for practicing physicians exist to develop their leadership skills, there is a paucity of leadership opportunities for post graduate trainees. In response to this gap, both the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada have recommended that leadership training be considered a focus in Post Graduate Medical Education (PGME)...
October 2016: Canadian Medical Education Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343699/operative-innovation-and-device-development-a-trainee-s-perspective
#2
Farokh R Demehri
Farokh R. Demehri, MD, is a chief resident in general surgery and Pediatric Innovation Fellow at the University of Michigan. As a trainee, he has worked on device development in pediatric enteral access with James D. Geiger, MD, and device solutions for short bowel syndrome under the mentorship of Daniel H. Teitelbaum, MD.
April 2017: Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290953/chief-of-residents-for-quality-improvement-and-patient-safety-a-recipe-for-a-new-role-in-graduate-medical-education
#3
Kelly Ferraro, Randall Zernzach, Stephen Maturo, Christopher Nagy, Rebecca Barrett
INTRODUCTION: The San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium (SAUSHEC) is the largest group of residency programs in the Department of Defense. In an effort to provide improved Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QI/PS) training for its residents, SAUSHEC created the position of Chief of QI/PS for Residents in the academic year 2014-2015. The Chief of QI/PS for Residents was based in the Internal Medicine residency program but also assisted with SAUSHEC-wide QI/PS projects...
March 2017: Military Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28287827/intensive-care-unit-educators-a-multicenter-evaluation-of-behaviors-residents-value-in-attendings
#4
Lekshmi Santhosh, Snigdha Jain, Anna Brady, Michelle Sharp, W Graham Carlos
RATIONALE: It is important for attendings to know which behaviors influence learner perceptions. To date, two studies focusing on general medicine attendings have been published addressing internal medicine residents' perceptions of attendings; there are no data on intensive care unit (ICU) attendings. OBJECTIVES: We sought to expand the evidence regarding this topic through a multicenter study at four geographically diverse academic medical centers. Our study focused on identifying the teaching behaviors of ICU physicians that learners observe in attendings they value as effective educators...
March 13, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28285275/assessment-of-junior-doctors-admission-notes-do-they-follow-what-they-learn
#5
Rashid A Barnawi, Abdulaziz M Ghurab, Hassan K Balubaid, Sultan S Alfaer, Kamal A Hanbazazah, Mohammed F Bukhari, Omayma A Hamed, Talal M Bakhsh
Objectives: To assess the completeness of history-taking and physical-examination notes of junior doctors at King Abdulaziz University Hospital per the approach they learned in medical school. Methods: In this retrospective study, we reviewed 860 admission notes written by 269 junior doctors (interns and residents) in an academic tertiary-care medical centre in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over a two-month period. Notes were evaluated for completeness using a checklist developed with reference to relevant medical textbooks...
March 11, 2017: International Journal of Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283919/preventing-returns-to-the-emergency-department-followingbariatric-surgery
#6
Jennwood Chen, Justin Mackenzie, Yan Zhai, James O'Loughlin, Rebecca Kholer, Ellen Morrow, Robert Glasgow, Eric Volckmann, Anna Ibele
BACKGROUND: Unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits following bariatric surgery represent a significant source of inefficient resource utilization. This study aimed to identify potential strategies aimed at preventing unnecessary returns to the ED following bariatric surgery. The study was conducted in University Hospital, USA. METHODS: The electronic medical records of all patients who underwent bariatric surgery at our institution between January 2011 and October 2015 were retrospectively reviewed...
March 10, 2017: Obesity Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259335/research-in-pediatric-residency-national-experience-of-pediatric-chief-residents
#7
Megan S McHenry, Erika L Abramson, Michael P McKenna, Su-Ting T Li
OBJECTIVE: To determine factors associated with increased research productivity, satisfaction, and perceived barriers to research within residency from the experience of pediatric chief residents. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was administered to academic year 2014-15 chief residents. Topics assessed included program demographic characteristics, career intentions, research productivity, satisfaction with research training and opportunities, and research barriers...
March 2017: Academic Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259204/perioperative-self-reflection-among-surgical-residents
#8
Andi N Peshkepija, Marc D Basson, Alan T Davis, Muhammad Ali, Pam S Haan, Rama N Gupta, John C Hardaway, Cody A Nebeker, Michael K McLeod, Robert L Osmer, Cheryl I Anderson
BACKGROUND: We studied prevalence and predictors of meaningful self-reflection among surgical residents and with prompting/structured interventions, sought to improve/sustain resident skills. METHODS: Residents from six programs recorded 1032 narrative self-reflective comments (120 residents), using a web-based platform. If residents identified something learned or to be improved, self-reflection was deemed meaningful. Independent variables PGY level, resident/surgeon gender, study site/Phase1: July2014-August2015 vs...
December 23, 2016: American Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28116017/emergency-medicine-resident-orientation-how-training-programs-get-their-residents-started
#9
Jillian McGrath, Michael Barrie, David P Way
INTRODUCTION: The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM) residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States...
January 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28115430/program-chief-resident-introducing-a-new-leadership-role-for-residency-programs
#10
Laura Shoots, Karen Schultz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28062819/maternity-care-services-provided-by-family-physicians-in-rural-hospitals
#11
Richard A Young
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to describe how many rural family physicians (FPs) and other types of providers currently provide maternity care services, and the requirements to obtain privileges. METHODS: Chief executive officers of rural hospitals were purposively sampled in 15 geographically diverse states with significant rural areas in 2013 to 2014. Questions were asked about the provision of maternity care services, the physicians who perform them, and qualifications required to obtain maternity care privileges...
January 2017: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057292/impact-of-integrated-programs-on-general-surgery-operative-volume
#12
Amanda R Jensen, Brianne L Nickel, Scott C Dolejs, David F Canal, Laura Torbeck, Jennifer N Choi
BACKGROUND: Integrated residencies are now commonplace, co-existing with categorical general surgery residencies. The purpose of this study was to define the impact of integrated programs on categorical general surgery operative volume. METHODS: Case logs from categorical general, integrated plastics, vascular, and thoracic surgery residents from a single institution from 2008 to 2016 were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Integrated residents have increased the number of cases they perform that would have previously been general surgery resident cases from 11 in 2009-2010 to 1392 in 2015-2016...
December 27, 2016: American Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28049392/chondroitin-sulfate-cs-lyases-structure-function-and-application-in-therapeutics
#13
Aruna Rani, Seema Patel, Arun Goyal
Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) such as chondroitin sulfate (CS) are the chief natural polysaccharides which reside in biological tissues mainly in extracellular matrix. These CS along with adhesion molecules and growth factors are involved in central nervous system (CNS) development, cell progression and pathogenesis. The chondroitin lyases are the enzyme that degrade and alter the CS chains and hence modify various signalling pathways involving CS chains. These CS lyases are substrate specific, can precisely manipulate the CS polysaccharides and have various biotechnological, medical and therapeutic applications...
January 2, 2017: Current Protein & Peptide Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025234/disparities-in-aesthetic-procedures-performed-by-plastic-surgery-residents
#14
Jason Silvestre, Joseph M Serletti, Benjamin Chang
BACKGROUND: Operative experience in aesthetic surgery is an important issue affecting plastic surgery residents. OBJECTIVES: This study addresses the variability of aesthetic surgery experience during plastic surgery residency. METHODS: National operative case logs of chief residents in independent/combined and integrated plastic surgery residency programs were analyzed (2011-2015). Fold differences between the bottom and top 10th percentiles of residents were calculated for each aesthetic procedure category and training model...
December 26, 2016: Aesthetic Surgery Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012887/-the-actualized-neurosurgeon-a-proposed-model-of-surgical-resident-development
#15
Nir Lipsman, Osaama Khan, Abhaya V Kulkarni
BACKGROUND: Modern neurosurgical training is both physically and emotionally demanding, posing significant challenges, new and old, to residents as well as programs attempting to train safe, competent surgeons. Models to describe resident development, such as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies and milestones, address the acquisition of specific skills but largely ignore the stresses and pressures unique to each stage of resident training. METHODS: We propose an alternative model of resident development adapted from the developmental psychology literature...
March 2017: World Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27998548/do-errors-and-critical-events-relate-to-hernia-repair-outcomes
#16
Katherine Law Forsyth, Shannon M DiMarco, Caitlin G Jenewein, Rebecca D Ray, Anne-Lise D D'Angelo, Elaine R Cohen, Douglas A Wiegmann, Carla M Pugh
BACKGROUND: The study aimed to validate an error checklist for simulated laparoscopic ventral hernia (LVH) repair procedures. We hypothesize that residents' errors can be assessed with a structured checklist and the results will correlate significantly with procedural outcomes. METHODS: Senior residents' (N = 7) performance on a LVH simulator were video-recorded and analyzed using a human error checklist. Junior residents (N = 38) performed two steps of the same simulated LVH procedure...
November 17, 2016: American Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27932029/implementing-a-resident-acute-care-surgery-service-improving-resident-education-and-patient-care
#17
Olga Kantor, Andrew B Schneider, Marko Rojnica, Andrew J Benjamin, Nancy Schindler, Mitchell C Posner, Jeffrey B Matthews, Kevin K Roggin
BACKGROUND: To simulate the duties and responsibilities of an attending surgeon and allow senior residents more intraoperative and perioperative autonomy, our program created a new resident acute care surgery consult service. METHODS: We structured resident acute care surgery as a new admitting and inpatient consult service managed by chief and senior residents with attending supervision. When appropriate, the chief resident served as a teaching assistant in the operation...
March 2017: Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27924665/behind-closed-doors
#18
Kevin Duan, Leslie Sheu
This Personal View about feedback culture is based on our personal experiences as internal medicine chief residents with attendings, residents, and interns who came into our office to discuss concerns about team members. Our unique perspective as chief residents revealed a tendency amongst physicians at all levels of training to first raise these concerns behind closed doors, instead of with the learner directly. We highlight the need to shift feedback culture in medical training away from this practice towards a clinical "micro-coaching" approach...
December 7, 2016: Medical Teacher
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908501/prospective-evaluation-of-surgical-palliative-care-immersion-training-for-general-surgery-residents
#19
Mustafa Raoof, Lisa O'Neill, Leigh Neumayer, Mindy Fain, Robert Krouse
BACKGROUND: Palliative care competencies in surgical training are recognized to improve the care of surgical patients with advanced or life-threatening illnesses. Formal programs to teach these competencies are lacking. The study aims to assess the feasibility and utility of a unique surgical palliative care immersion training program. STUDY DESIGN: A half-day Surgical Palliative Care Immersion Training (SPCIT) was developed using the American College of Surgeon's manual titled "Surgical Palliative Care: A Resident's Guide" as a framework...
November 27, 2016: American Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906760/improving-the-quality-of-ward-based-surgical-care-with-a-human-factors-intervention-bundle
#20
Maximilian J Johnston, Sonal Arora, Dominic King, Ara Darzi
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the impact of a human factors intervention bundle on the quality of ward-based surgical care in a UK hospital. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Improving the culture of a surgical team is a difficult task. Engagement with stakeholders before intervention is key. Studies have shown that appropriate supervision can enhance surgical ward safety. METHODS: A pre-post intervention study was conducted. The intervention bundle consisted of twice-daily attending ward rounds, a "chief resident of the week" available at all times on the ward, an escalation of care protocol and team contact cards...
November 30, 2016: Annals of Surgery
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