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Rupa Banerjee, Hrushikesh Chaudhari, Nirish Shah, Arjunan Saravanan, Manu Tandan, D Nageshwar Reddy
BACKGROUND: Adequate bowel preparation is an essential prerequisite for complete mucosal visualization during colonoscopy. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions are commonly used. However the large volume of the solution is often poorly tolerated. Addition of Lubiprostone (LB) could improve the adequacy of standard PEG preparation & reduce requirement. The aims to assess adequacy of PEG preparation with addition of single dose LB (24mcg) vs placebo and efficacy of reduced dose PEG + LB compared with full dose PEG + LB...
October 13, 2016: BMC Gastroenterology
L Chang, W D Chey, D Drossman, T Losch-Beridon, M Wang, P Lichtlen, S Mareya
BACKGROUND: Lubiprostone (8 μg b.d.) received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 2008 for the treatment of constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) in women aged ≥18 years. In 2012, the FDA issued new guidance for IBS-C clinical trials, recommending a composite endpoint incorporating both abdominal pain and stool frequency. AIM: In a post hoc analysis, similar criteria were applied to data from two pivotal, phase 3, double-blind, randomised trials of lubiprostone in patients with IBS-C...
November 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Irene Sarosiek, Mohammad Bashashati, Alicia Alvarez, Mark Hall, Nagasri Shankar, Yvette Gomez, Richard W McCallum, Jerzy Sarosiek
BACKGROUND: Lubiprostone is an effective treatment for chronic constipation (CC). The mechanism of action of lubiprostone is through increasing fluid secretion and lubrication of the intestinal lumen. The effects of lubiprostone on gastrointestinal transit and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) have not been adequately explored. The current study was designed to investigate whether lubiprostone (1) alters gastrointestinal transit and (2) affects SIBO in patients with constipation...
September 2016: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
Wojciech Leppert, Jaroslaw Woron
Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) significantly deteriorate patients' quality of life and may lead to noncompliance with opioid schedule and undertreatment of pain. Although traditional oral laxatives are the first-line treatment of OIC, they do not address OIBD pathophysiology, and display numerous adverse effects. OIC treatment includes prokinetics (lubiprostone), opioid switch, and changing route of opioid administration...
September 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology
Irene Sonu, George Triadafilopoulos, Jerry D Gardner
BACKGROUND: Clinical trials of several new treatments for opioid-induced constipation (OIC), chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C) have focused on differences between subjects relieved of constipation with placebo and active treatment. Patients and clinicians however, are more interested in the probability these treatments provide actual relief of constipation and its associated symptoms. METHODS: We searched the medical literature using MEDLINE and Cochrane central register of controlled trials...
2016: BMJ Open Gastroenterology
Sita Chokhavatia, Elizabeth S John, Mary Barna Bridgeman, Deepali Dixit
Constipation is a common and often debilitating condition in the elderly, which may be caused by underlying disease conditions, structural abnormalities in the bowel, and a variety of medications such as anticholinergics, antidepressants, and opiates. In this review, we focus on opioid-induced constipation (OIC), which is often underrecognized and undertreated in the elderly. When opioid therapy is initiated, healthcare providers are encouraged to evaluate risk factors for the development of constipation as part of a thorough patient history...
August 2016: Drugs & Aging
Jan Tack, Tim Vanuytsel, Maura Corsetti
In the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), loperamide seems efficacious for diarrhea and ispaghula for constipation, while musculotropic spasmolytics may relieve abdominal pain. Antidepressants were found to be efficacious for abdominal pain, but their tolerance may be problematic and the therapeutic effect varied largely between trials. While meta-analyses suggest efficacy of probiotics as a group, the quality of the trials is often suboptimal and there is large variability. Lubiprostone, a chloride channel activator, and linaclotide, a guanylyl cyclase-C agonist, showed favorable effects on multiple symptoms in IBS with constipation...
2016: Digestive Diseases
Fermín Mearin, Constanza Ciriza, Miguel Mínguez, Enrique Rey, Juan José Mascort, Enrique Peña, Pedro Cañones, Javier Júdez
In this Clinical Practice Guideline we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of adult patients with constipation and abdominal complaints at the confluence of the irritable bowel syndrome spectrum and functional constipation. Both conditions are included among the functional bowel disorders, and have a significant personal, healthcare, and social impact, affecting the quality of life of the patients who suffer from them. The first one is the irritable bowel syndrome subtype, where constipation represents the predominant complaint, in association with recurrent abdominal pain, bloating, and abdominal distension...
June 2016: Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas
Manhal Izzy, Anju Malieckal, Erin Little, Sury Anand
AIM: To study the efficacy and safety of pharmacological treatment of constipation in geriatrics. METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, google scholar, and Ovid were searched to identify human studies performed on the use of laxatives in elderly with constipation, which were conducted between January 1990 and January 2013 using the specified keywords. Controlled studies that enrolled geriatric patients with a diagnosis of constipation and addressed the efficacy and/or the safety of pharmacological treatments were included...
May 6, 2016: World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Anthony James Hatswell, Stefan Vegter
BACKGROUND: In health economic evaluations, quality of life should be measured with preference-based utilities, such as the EuroQol 5 Dimension 3-level (EQ-5D-3 L). Non-preference-based instruments (often disease-specific questionnaires) are commonly mapped to utilities. We investigated if the relationship observed between the Patient Assessment of Constipation Quality of Life (PAC-QOL) and the EQ-5D-3 L in patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) also applies in opioid-induced constipation (OIC)...
December 2016: Health Economics Review
Mei Ao, Jada C Domingue, Nabihah Khan, Fatima Javed, Kashif Osmani, Jayashree Sarathy, Mrinalini C Rao
Bile acids (BAs) play a complex role in colonic fluid secretion. We showed that dihydroxy BAs, but not the monohydroxy BA lithocholic acid (LCA), stimulate Cl(-) secretion in human colonic T84 cells (Ao M, Sarathy J, Domingue J, Alrefai WA, Rao MC. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 305: C447-C456, 2013). In this study, we explored the effect of LCA on the action of other secretagogues in T84 cells. While LCA (50 μM, 15 min) drastically (>90%) inhibited FSK-stimulated short-circuit current (Isc), it did not alter carbachol-stimulated Isc LCA did not alter basal Isc, transepithelial resistance, cell viability, or cytotoxicity...
June 1, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Cell Physiology
Fan Li, Tao Fu, Wei-Dong Tong, Bao-Hua Liu, Chun-Xue Li, Yu Gao, Jin-Song Wu, Xiang-Feng Wang, An-Ping Zhang
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of lubiprostone in the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed a literature search of the MEDLINE, Cochrane, Google Scholar, and databases (from January 1, 2005, through January 31, 2015). Relevant studies meeting the inclusion criteria were manually searched by 2 independent reviewers. Efficacy outcomes evaluated at 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months of intervention were weekly frequency of spontaneous bowel movements, severity of constipation, consistency of stools, degree of abdominal pain/discomfort, degree of straining, and abdominal bloating...
April 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Satish S C Rao, Kulthep Rattanakovit, Tanisa Patcharatrakul
Constipation is a heterogeneous, polysymptomatic, multifactorial disease. Acute or transient constipation can be due to changes in diet, travel or stress, and secondary constipation can result from drug treatment, neurological or metabolic conditions or, rarely, colon cancer. A diagnosis of primary chronic constipation is made after exclusion of secondary causes of constipation and encompasses several overlapping subtypes. Slow-transit constipation is characterized by prolonged colonic transit in the absence of pelvic floor dysfunction...
May 2016: Nature Reviews. Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Huan Huang, Douglas C Aa Taylor, Robyn T Carson, Phil Sarocco, Mark Friedman, Michael Munsell, Steven I Blum, Joseph Menzin
PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness and costs of linaclotide (Linzess) versus lubiprostone (Amitiza) in the treatment of adult patients with chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC). DESIGN: A decision-tree model using model inputs derived from published literature, linaclotide phase 3 trial data, and a physician survey. METHODOLOGY: Measures of treatment efficacy were selected based on comparability between trial data, with posthoc analyses of linaclotide required to ensure comparability with available lubiprostone data...
February 2016: Managed Care
Egilius L H Spierings, Randall P Brewer, Richard L Rauck, Taryn Losch-Beridon, Shadreck M Mareya
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether lubiprostone 24 μg twice daily (BID), administered to relieve opioid-induced constipation (OIC), affects opioid analgesia in patients with chronic noncancer pain. METHODS: Data were pooled from 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of lubiprostone in adults with chronic noncancer pain receiving stable opioid analgesia and who had documented OIC. In each study, lubiprostone 24 μg BID or placebo was administered for 12 weeks for relief of OIC using a common protocol...
March 15, 2016: Pain Practice: the Official Journal of World Institute of Pain
Renee M Holder, Diane Rhee
Opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed and play an important role in chronic pain management. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, which includes constipation, hardened stool, incomplete evacuation, gas, and nausea and vomiting, is the most common adverse event associated with opioid use. Mu-opioid receptors are specifically responsible for opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, resulting in reduced peristaltic and secretory actions. Agents that reverse these actions in the bowel without reversing pain control in the central nervous system may be preferred over traditional laxatives...
March 2016: Pharmacotherapy
Maura Corsetti, Peter Whorwell
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed...
July 2016: Expert Review of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Caitlyn T Solem, Haridarshan Patel, Sonam Mehta, Reema Mody, Cynthia Macahilig, Xin Gao
Objectives Real-world patient outcomes data is scarce concerning the high disease burden of IBS-C. The aim of this study was to compare patient-reported symptom control, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), resource utilization, and treatment satisfaction of lubiprostone vs non-lubiprostone treatment for irritable bowel syndrome-constipation (IBS-C). Research design and methods An observational, retrospective US chart review and computer-assisted telephone patient survey was conducted March to August 2013 recruiting women over 18 years old with physician-confirmed IBS-C who had initiated new treatment from inadequate relief of previous treatments and who had been on the new treatment ≥3 months...
May 2016: Current Medical Research and Opinion
Chunhuan Jiang, Qinglong Xu, Xiaoan Wen, Hongbin Sun
Chronic constipation is a common gastrointestinal disease severely affecting the patient׳s quality of life. The traditional treatment of constipation is the use of laxatives. Recently, several new drugs including lubiprostone, linaclotide and prucalopride have been approved for treatment of chronic constipation. However, a significant unmet medical need still remains, particularly among those patients achieving poor results by current therapies. The 5-HT4 receptor modulators velusetrag and naronapride, the guanylate cyclase C agonist plecanatide and the ileal bile acid transporter inhibitor elobixibat are recognized as the most promising drugs under investigation...
July 2015: Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica. B
Brian E Lacy, William D Chey, Anthony J Lembo
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches...
April 2015: Gastroenterology & Hepatology
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