Read by QxMD icon Read

Motion perception

Rumi Hisakata, Daisuke Hayashi, Ikuya Murakami
The static envelope of a Gabor patch with a moving sinusoidal carrier appears shifted in the direction of the carrier motion (De Valois & De Valois, 1991). This phenomenon is called motion-induced position shift. Although several motion-processing stages, ranging from low- to high-level processes, may contribute to position estimation, it is unknown whether a binocular matching stage or an even earlier stage exerts an influence. To elucidate this matter, we investigated the disparity tuning of this illusion by manipulating the binocular disparities of the carrier and the envelope...
October 1, 2016: Journal of Vision
Preeti Raghavan, Daniel Geller, Nina Guerrero, Viswanath Aluru, Joseph P Eimicke, Jeanne A Teresi, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Anna Palumbo, Alan Turry
: Stroke is a leading cause of disability worldwide. It leads to a sudden and overwhelming disruption in one's physical body, and alters the stroke survivors' sense of self. Long-term recovery requires that bodily perception, social participation and sense of self are restored; this is challenging to achieve, particularly with a single intervention. However, rhythmic synchronization of movement to external stimuli facilitates sensorimotor coupling for movement recovery, enhances emotional engagement and has positive effects on interpersonal relationships...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Georgie Powell, Zoe Meredith, Rebecca McMillin, Tom C A Freeman
According to Bayesian models, perception and cognition depend on the optimal combination of noisy incoming evidence with prior knowledge of the world. Individual differences in perception should therefore be jointly determined by a person's sensitivity to incoming evidence and his or her prior expectations. It has been proposed that individuals with autism have flatter prior distributions than do nonautistic individuals, which suggests that prior variance is linked to the degree of autistic traits in the general population...
October 21, 2016: Psychological Science
Martin Dobricki, Paul Pauli
Almost all living species regularly explore environments that they experience as pleasant, aversive, arousing or frightening. We postulate that such exploratory behavior and emotional experience both are regulated based on the interdependent perception of one's body and stimuli that collectively define a spatial context such as a cliff. Here we examined this by testing if the interaction of the sensory input on one's gait and the sensory input on the spatial context is modulating both the emotional experience of the environment and its exploration through head motion...
October 2016: Heliyon
Verónica Pérez-Schuster, Anirudh Kulkarni, Morgane Nouvian, Sebastián A Romano, Konstantinos Lygdas, Adrien Jouary, Mario Dippopa, Thomas Pietri, Mathieu Haudrechy, Virginie Candat, Jonathan Boulanger-Weill, Vincent Hakim, Germán Sumbre
Following moving visual stimuli (conditioning stimuli, CS), many organisms perceive, in the absence of physical stimuli, illusory motion in the opposite direction. This phenomenon is known as the motion aftereffect (MAE). Here, we use MAE as a tool to study the neuronal basis of visual motion perception in zebrafish larvae. Using zebrafish eye movements as an indicator of visual motion perception, we find that larvae perceive MAE. Blocking eye movements using optogenetics during CS presentation did not affect MAE, but tectal ablation significantly weakened it...
October 18, 2016: Cell Reports
David P McGovern, Kevin S Walsh, Jason Bell, Fiona N Newell
Both spatial and temporal context influence our perception of visual stimuli. For instance, both nearby moving stimuli and recently viewed motion can lead to biases in the perceived direction of a moving stimulus. Due to similarities in the spatial tuning properties of these spatial and temporal context-dependent effects, it is often assumed that they share a functional goal in motion processing and arise from common neural mechanisms. However, the psychophysical evidence concerning this assumption is inconsistent...
October 17, 2016: Vision Research
Elisha E Simpson, N Justin Marshall, Karen L Cheney
Visual illusions occur when information from images are perceived differently from the actual physical properties of the stimulus in terms of brightness, size, colour and/or motion. Illusions are therefore important tools for sensory perception research and from an ecological perspective, relevant for visually guided animals viewing signals in heterogeneous environments. Here, we tested whether fish perceived a lightness cube illusion in which identical coloured targets appear (for humans) to return different spectral outputs depending on the apparent amount of illumination they are perceived to be under...
October 17, 2016: Scientific Reports
Maria J S Guerreiro, Lisa Putzar, Brigitte Röder
Recent neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that a brief period of congenital blindness induces long-lasting reorganization within the visual cortex of sight-recovery humans [1, 2]. However, the behavioral consequences of this cross-modal reorganization are not yet known. Here we investigated this question by examining the transfer of motion aftereffects across the visual and auditory modalities within six individuals who had been born blind due to dense bilateral cataracts and regained sight when they were treated at 5-24 months of age...
October 1, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Jean-François Nankoo, Christopher R Madan, Marcia L Spetch, Douglas R Wylie
Global motion perception is important for mobile organisms. In laterally eyed birds, global motion appears to be processed in the entopallium, a neural structure that is part of the tectofugal pathway. Electrophysiological research has shown that motion selective cells in the entopallium are most responsive to small dark moving targets. Here, we investigated whether this bias toward dark targets of entopallial cells is mirrored by perceptual performance in a motion detection task in pigeons. We measured the detection thresholds of pigeons using random dot stimuli that consisted of either black or white dots on a gray background...
October 14, 2016: Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
Parvin Zarei Eskikand, Tatiana Kameneva, Michael R Ibbotson, Anthony N Burkitt, David B Grayden
We present a model of the early stages of processing in the visual cortex, in particular V1 and MT, to investigate the potential role of end-stopped V1 neurons in solving the aperture problem. A hierarchical network is used in which the incoming motion signals provided by complex V1 neurons and end-stopped V1 neurons proceed to MT neurons at the next stage. MT neurons are categorized into two types based on their function: integration and segmentation. The role of integration neurons is to propagate unambiguous motion signals arriving from those V1 neurons that emphasize object terminators (e...
2016: PloS One
Lara A Coelho, Giovanna Zaninelli, Claudia L R Gonzalez
Previous research has found that the perception of our hands is inaccurate. This distorted representation has several constant characteristics including an overestimation of hand width and an underestimation of finger length. In this study, we further investigate this phenomenon by exploring the boundaries of hand representation. Participants placed one hand underneath a table top so it was occluded from view. Using their free hand, participants were instructed to point to the location where they believed the tips and bases of each of their fingers were...
October 13, 2016: Psychological Research
Raz Leib, Firas Mawase, Amir Karniel, Opher Donchin, John Rothwell, Ilana Nisky, Marco Davare
: How motion and sensory inputs are combined to assess an object's stiffness is still unknown. Here, we provide evidence for the existence of a stiffness estimator in the human posterior parietal cortex (PPC). We showed previously that delaying force feedback with respect to motion when interacting with an object caused participants to underestimate its stiffness. We found that applying theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the PPC, but not the dorsal premotor cortex, enhances this effect without affecting movement control...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Joel Pearson, Rocco Chiou, Sebastian Rogers, Marcus Wicken, Stewart Heitmann, Bard Ermentrout
Hallucinations occur in both normal and clinical populations. Due to their unpredictability and complexity, the mechanisms underlying hallucinations remain largely untested. Here we show that visual hallucinations can be induced in the normal population by visual flicker, limited to an annulus that constricts content complexity to simple moving grey blobs, allowing objective mechanistic investigation. Hallucination strength peaked at ~11 Hz flicker and was dependent on cortical processing. Hallucinated motion speed increased with flicker rate, when mapped onto visual cortex it was independent of eccentricity, underwent local sensory adaptation and showed the same bistable and mnemonic dynamics as sensory perception...
October 11, 2016: ELife
Shinsuke Nakayama, Hidemi Teramoto
 The umami taste amino acid, glutamate acts as a signaling molecule in multiple cellular systems in the body, including the brain and gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, glutamate may affect appetite by modulating gastrointestinal motility as well as through taste perception. In this study, we examined the effect of glutamate on gastric emptying and duodenal motility, by using rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten healthy male volunteers participated in the measurements. Abdominal coronal MR images were successively acquired after ingestion of a liquid meal with and without monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)...
2016: Yakugaku Zasshi: Journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan
Emmanuele Tidoni, Michele Scandola, Veronica Orvalho, Matteo Candidi
Apparent biological motion is the perception of plausible movements when two alternating images depicting the initial and final phase of an action are presented at specific stimulus onset asynchronies. Here, we show lower subjective apparent biological motion perception when actions are observed from a first relative to a third visual perspective. These findings are discussed within the context of sensorimotor contributions to body ownership.
September 2016: I-Perception
Shinji Nakamura, Stephen Palmisano, Juno Kim
Adding simulated viewpoint jitter or oscillation to displays enhances visually induced illusions of self-motion (vection). The cause of this enhancement is yet to be fully understood. Here, we conducted psychophysical experiments to investigate the effects of different types of simulated oscillation on vertical vection. Observers viewed horizontally oscillating and nonoscillating optic flow fields simulating downward self-motion through an aperture. The aperture was visually simulated to be nearer to the observer and was stationary or oscillating in-phase or counter-phase to the direction of background horizontal oscillations of optic flow...
July 2016: I-Perception
Dina Devyatko, L Gregory Appelbaum, Stephen R Mitroff
Several striking visual phenomena involve a physically present stimulus that alternates between being perceived and being "invisible." For example, motion-induced blindness, the Troxler effect, and perceptual filling-in all consist of subjective alternations where an item repeatedly changes from being seen to unseen. In the present study, we explored whether these three specific visual phenomena share any commonalities in their alternation rates and patterns to better understand the mechanisms of each. Data from 69 individuals revealed moderate to strong correlations across the three phenomena for the number of perceptual disappearances and the accumulated duration of the disappearances...
October 3, 2016: Perception
Mick Zeljko, Philip M Grove
The stream-bounce effect refers to a bistable motion stimulus that is interpreted as two targets either "streaming" past or "bouncing" off one another, and the manipulations that bias responses. Directional bias, according to Bertenthal et al., is an account of the effect proposing that low-level motion integration promotes streaming, and its disruption leads to bouncing, and it is sometimes cited either directly in a bottom-up fashion or indirectly under top-down control despite Sekuler and Sekuler finding evidence inconsistent with it...
October 3, 2016: Perception
Jasper H Fabius, Alessio Fracasso, Stefan Van der Stigchel
As the neural representation of visual information is initially coded in retinotopic coordinates, eye movements (saccades) pose a major problem for visual stability. If no visual information were maintained across saccades, retinotopic representations would have to be rebuilt after each saccade. It is currently strongly debated what kind of information (if any at all) is accumulated across saccades, and when this information becomes available after a saccade. Here, we use a motion illusion to examine the accumulation of visual information across saccades...
September 30, 2016: Scientific Reports
Paul Wurzer, Abigail A Forbes, Gabriel Hundeshagen, Clark R Andersen, Kathryn M Epperson, Walter J Meyer, Lars P Kamolz, Ludwik K Branski, Oscar E Suman, David N Herndon, Celeste C Finnerty
PURPOSE: We assessed the perception of scarring and distress by pediatric burn survivors with burns covering more than one-third of total body surface area (TBSA) for up to 2 years post-burn. METHODS: Children with severe burns were admitted to our hospital between 2004 and 2012, and consented to this IRB-approved-study. Subjects completed at least one Scars Problems and/or Distress questionnaire between discharge and 24 months post burn. Outcomes were modeled with generalized estimating equations or using mixed linear models...
August 16, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"