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Deepthi Alapati, Edward E Morrisey
While our understanding of the genetics and pathology of congenital lung diseases such as surfactant protein deficiency, cystic fibrosis and alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency is extensive, treatment options are lacking. Since the lung is a barrier organ in direct communication with the external environment, targeted delivery of gene corrective technologies to the respiratory system via intra-tracheal or intranasal routes is an attractive option for therapy. CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology is a promising approach to repair or inactivate disease causing mutations...
October 25, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
Anne Argenta, Latha Satish, Phillip Gallo, Fang Liu, Sandeep Kathju
OBJECTIVE: To determine if local prophylactic application of probiotic bacteria to burn wounds will prevent death in a mouse model of burn wound sepsis. BACKGROUND: Infection remains the most common complication after burn injury and can result in sepsis and death, despite the use of topical and systemic antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequently implicated pathogen. Local application of probiotics directly to burn wounds is an attractive novel intervention that avoids the pitfalls of standard antibiotic therapies...
2016: PloS One
Petra D Cravens, Rehana Z Hussain, William A Miller-Little, Li-Hong Ben, Benjamin M Segal, Emily Herndon, Olaf Stüve
BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 are heterodimers that share the p40 subunit, and both cytokines are critical in the differentiation of T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells, respectively. Th1 and Th17 effector cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), an animal model of the human central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). However, ustekinumab, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against p40 failed to show efficacy over placebo in a phase II clinical trial in patients with MS...
2016: PloS One
Eildert Groeneveld, Helmut Lichtenberg
The fast development of high throughput genotyping has opened up new possibilities in genetics while at the same time producing considerable data handling issues. TheSNPpit is a database system for managing large amounts of multi panel SNP genotype data from any genotyping platform. With an increasing rate of genotyping in areas like animal and plant breeding as well as human genetics, already now hundreds of thousand of individuals need to be managed. While the common database design with one row per SNP can manage hundreds of samples this approach becomes progressively slower as the size of the data sets increase until it finally fails completely once tens or even hundreds of thousands of individuals need to be managed...
2016: PloS One
Aviram Kogot-Levin, Ann Saada, Gil Leibowitz, Devorah Soiferman, Liza Douiev, Itamar Raz, Sarah Weksler-Zangen
Cytochrome-c-oxidase (COX) deficiency is a frequent cause of mitochondrial disease and is associated with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. We studied mitochondrial function and biogenesis in fibroblasts derived from the Cohen (CDs) rat, an animal model of COX deficiency. COX activity in CDs-fibroblasts was 50% reduced compared to control rat fibroblasts (P<0.01). ROS-production in CDs fibroblasts increased, along with marked mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased mitochondrial membrane-potential, indicating mitochondrial dysfunction...
2016: PloS One
Kuan-Ho Lin, Chien-Liang Liu, Wei-Wen Kuo, Catherine Reena Paul, Wei-Kung Chen, Su-Ying Wen, Cecilia Hsuan Day, Hsi-Chin Wu, Vijaya Padma Viswanadha, Chih-Yang Huang
Cardiac trauma has been recognized as a complication associated with blunt chest trauma involving coronary artery injury, myocardium contusion and myocardial rupture. Secondary cardiac injuries after trauma supposed to be a critical factor in trauma patients, but the mechanism is not fully explored. Overproduction of TNF-alpha had been reported in multiple trauma animals, this induces oxidative stress resulting in cardiac apoptosis. Apoptosis gradually increases after trauma and reaches to a maximum level in 12 h time...
2016: PloS One
Tal Hoffmann, Katrin Kistner, Richard W Carr, Mohammed A Nassar, Peter W Reeh, Christian Weidner
The upregulation of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 has previously been associated with inflammatory hyperalgesia. Na1.9 knockout (KO) mice, however, did not seem insensitive in conventional tests of acute nociception. Using electrophysiological, neurochemical, and behavioral techniques, we now show NaV1.9-null mice exhibit impaired mechanical and thermal sensory capacities and reduced electrical excitability of nociceptors. In single-fiber recordings from isolated skin, the electrical threshold of NaV1...
September 15, 2016: Pain
Fatemeh Shaki, Sorour Ashari, Nematollah Ahangar
BACKGROUND: Ciprofloxacin is a synthetic broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent of fluoroquinolone family. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate the role of oxidative damage and inflammation in nephrotoxic potential of Ciprofloxacin and protective effects of melatonin against its nephrotoxicity in male Wistar rats. METHODS: The animals were divided into six groups: Control, ciprofloxacin (100mg/kg/day, i.p), ciprofloxacin with three doses (2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg/day) of melatonin and a group which received ciprofloxacin (100mg/kg/day) plus vitamin E (100mg/kg/day) for 8 consecutive days...
October 22, 2016: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Masoumeh Ghafarzadeh, Mehrdad Namdari, Ali Eatemadi
Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent congenital anomaly in newborn babies. Cardiac malformations have been induced in different animal model experiments, by perturbing some molecules that take part in the developmental pathways associated with myocyte differentiation, specification, or cardiac morphogenesis. The exact epigenetic, environmental, or genetic, basis for these molecules perturbations is yet to be understood. But, scientist have bridged this gap by introducing autologous stem cell into the defective hearts to treat CHD...
October 22, 2016: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
Marta W Vasconcelos, Wilhelm Gruissem, Navreet K Bhullar
Plant-based foods offer a wide range of nutrients that are essential for human and animal health. Among these nutrients, iron stands out as one of the most important micronutrients. Increasing the iron content in many staple and non-staple plant foods continues to be a goal of many scientists around the world. However, the success of such initiatives has sometimes fallen short of their expected targets. In this review we highlight the most recent and promising results that have contributed to increasing the iron content in different crops...
October 22, 2016: Current Opinion in Biotechnology
Eric J Warrant
As animals move through their environments they are subjected to an endless barrage of sensory signals. Of these, some will be of utmost importance, such as the tell-tale aroma of a potential mate, the distinctive appearance of a vital food source or the unmistakable sound of an approaching predator. Others will be less important. Indeed some will not be important at all. There are, for instance, wide realms of the sensory world that remain entirely undetected, simply because an animal lacks the physiological capacity to detect and analyse the signals that characterise this realm...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Binyamin Hochner, David L Glanzman
Members of the phylum Mollusca demonstrate the animal kingdom's tremendous diversity of body morphology, size and complexity of the nervous system, as well as diversity of behavioral repertoires, ranging from very simple to highly flexible. Molluscs include Solenogastres, with their worm-like bodies and behavior (see phylogenetic tree; Figure 1); Bivalvia (mussels and clams), protected by shells and practically immobile; and the cephalopods, such as the octopus, cuttlefish and squid. The latter are strange-looking animals with nervous systems comprising up to half a billion neurons, which mediate the complex behaviors that characterize these freely moving, highly visual predators...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Carmen Ramona Smarandache-Wellmann
Arthropods are very diverse, come in many different forms with diverse adaptations, and through such diversity have populated all environmental niches on the planet. Almost 80% of the animals on planet Earth belong to this phylum. Despite their very diverse phenotypes they share fundamental similarities which were previously used to generate a phylogenetic tree. All arthropods have segmented bodies and possess jointed limbs at all or many of their body segments. An additional common feature of arthropods is their exoskeleton, made mainly of chitin and/or sclerotin...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
William Schafer
Nematodes comprise one of the largest phyla in the animal kingdom, both in terms of individual numbers and species diversity. Although only 20,000-30,000 species have been described, it is estimated that the true number ranges between 100,000 and 10 million. Marine, freshwater, and terrestrial species are all widespread, and some nematodes have even been isolated from such inhospitable environments as deserts, hot springs, and polar seas. Some nematode species are parasitic, with either plant or animal hosts; other species are free-living microbivores, scavengers, or predators of insects or other nematodes...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
William B Kristan
How did a structure as complex as our own brain ever evolve? Although biologists have pondered this question since Charles Darwin, the explosion of molecular information in recent years has provided new insights into this question, particularly its first step: the evolution of neurons. Meshing information about genomes with insights from more classical anatomical, physiological, and developmental approaches has led to some remarkable insights and surprises. Because 'phylogenomics' is still a young field, however, there are arguments about which genes to include in comparisons, how much to weigh genetic versus 'classical' features, and which algorithms to use in making such comparisons...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Gonzalo Giribet
Ctenophores, one of the most basal branches in the tree of life, have been found to have a through-gut, complete with mouth and anus. Basal animals are surprisingly complex and simplification has been rampant in animal evolution.
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Irving E Wang, Thomas R Clandinin
The activity and maintenance of neurons requires substantial metabolic energy, resulting in selective pressure to decrease resource consumption by the nervous system. The wiring economy principle proposes that animals have evolved mechanisms that wire circuits efficiently by minimizing neurite length. Computational modeling of neuronal morphology, microcircuit organization, and neural networks reveals that wiring economy is a significant determinant of nervous system layout. The strategies for reducing wiring costs are shared across phyla and point to the possibility of generalizable rules that specify the development of efficient nervous systems...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
William J Joiner
Despite decades of intense study, the functions of sleep are still shrouded in mystery. The difficulty in understanding these functions can be at least partly attributed to the varied manifestations of sleep in different animals. Daily sleep duration can range from 4-20 hrs among mammals, and sleep can manifest throughout the brain, or it can alternate over time between cerebral hemispheres, depending on the species. Ecological factors are likely to have shaped these and other sleep behaviors during evolution by altering the properties of conserved arousal circuits in the brain...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Joerg T Albert, Andrei S Kozlov
The evolution of hearing in terrestrial animals has resulted in remarkable adaptations enabling exquisitely sensitive sound detection by the ear and sophisticated sound analysis by the brain. In this review, we examine several such characteristics, using examples from insects and vertebrates. We focus on two strong and interdependent forces that have been shaping the auditory systems across taxa: the physical environment of auditory transducers on the small, subcellular scale, and the sensory-ecological environment within which hearing happens, on a larger, evolutionary scale...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
John C Tuthill, Rachel I Wilson
The ability of animals to flexibly navigate through complex environments depends on the integration of sensory information with motor commands. The sensory modality most tightly linked to motor control is mechanosensation. Adaptive motor control depends critically on an animal's ability to respond to mechanical forces generated both within and outside the body. The compact neural circuits of insects provide appealing systems to investigate how mechanical cues guide locomotion in rugged environments. Here, we review our current understanding of mechanosensation in insects and its role in adaptive motor control...
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
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