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High Flow Nasal Ventilation

C Guillot, C Le Reun, H Behal, J Labreuche, M Recher, A Duhamel, S Leteurtre
BACKGROUND: Viral bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization in children during the first 12 months of life. There is evidence to support the use of noninvasive ventilation in bronchiolitis. A recent respiratory management of bronchiolitis is the use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFNC as the first-line treatment for children with severe bronchiolitis and the secondary objective was to identify factors for HFNC therapy failure...
March 15, 2018: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Li Huang, Calum T Roberts, Brett J Manley, Louise S Owen, Peter G Davis, Kim M Dalziel
OBJECTIVE: To compare the cost-effectiveness of 2 common "noninvasive" modes of respiratory support for infants born preterm. STUDY DESIGN: An economic evaluation was conducted as a component of a multicenter, randomized control trial from 2013 to 2015 enrolling infants born preterm at ≥28 weeks of gestation with respiratory distress, <24 hours old, who had not previously received endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation or surfactant. The economic evaluation was conducted from a healthcare sector perspective and the time horizon was from birth until death or first discharge...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
M Creaney, R M Moriarty, M Milner, C Murphy
Congenital muscular dystrophies are characterised by progressive skeletal muscle weakness from birth or early infancy. Maternal respiratory compromise, joint contractures and presence of spinal instrumentation or fusion are some of the anaesthetic challenges that may be encountered in the obstetric setting. The choice of anaesthetic technique for surgical delivery needs to be considered on an individual basis. Multi-disciplinary involvement is paramount to optimise peripartum care and outcomes. In this case report, we present the use of dexmedetomidine, humidified high-flow nasal oxygen, rocuronium and sugammadex in the anaesthetic management of a wheelchair-bound, non-invasive bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation-dependent parturient with congenital muscular dystrophy, who was presenting for caesarean section...
February 9, 2018: International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia
Andrew G Miller, Michael A Gentle, Lisa M Tyler, Natalie Napolitano
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) use has greatly increased in recent years. In non-neonatal pediatric patients, there are limited data available to guide HFNC use, and clinical practice may vary significantly. The goal of this study was to evaluate current HFNC practice by surveying practicing pediatric respiratory therapists. METHODS: A survey instrument was posted on the American Association for Respiratory Care's AARConnect online social media platform in March 2017...
March 13, 2018: Respiratory Care
Mihir Sarkar, Rajasree Sinha, Satyabrata Roychowdhoury, Sobhanman Mukhopadhyay, Pramit Ghosh, Kalpana Dutta, Shibarjun Ghosh
Background: Early initiation of appropriate noninvasive respiratory support is utmost important intervention to avoid mechanical ventilation in severe bronchiolitis. Aim: This study aims to compare noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and hot humidified high-flow nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) as modes of respiratory support in infants with severe bronchiolitis. Methods: Prospective, randomized, open-label pilot study done in a tertiary-care hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
C Overbergh, S Installe, A Boudewyns, K Van Hoorenbeeck, S L Verhulst
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used in children of all age ranges. The limited number of commercially available masks especially in infants and young children may complicate its use and compliance. In this report, we describe our experience with the use of the Optiflow™ (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) Nasal Cannula attached to a regular CPAP device in the setting of chronic CPAP use. This interface consists of a nasal cannula and was originally designed for the delivery of high-flow oxygen therapy...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
Matthew L Bradshaw, Alexandre Déragon, Pramod Puligandla, Guillaume Emeriaud, Anne-Marie Canakis, Patricia S Fontela
OBJECTIVE: To describe management practices and the factors guiding admission and treatment decisions for viral bronchiolitis across Canadian pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Canadian PICUs. SUBJECTS: Pediatric intensivists. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A survey using two case scenarios (non-intubated vs intubated patients) was developed using focus groups and a literature review...
February 27, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
Satoki Inoue, Yumiko Tamaki, Shota Sonobe, Junji Egawa, Masahiko Kawaguchi
Background: We describe a pediatric patient who suffered from critical abdominal distention caused by a combination of humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) oxygen therapy and nasal airway. Case presentation: A 21-month-old boy with a history of chronic lung disease was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immediately after admission, his airway was established using a tracheal tube and mechanical ventilation was started. Five days after the commencement of mechanical ventilation, finally, his trachea was extubated...
2018: JA Clin Rep
Jennifer M Guay, Dru Carvi, Deborah A Raines, Wendy A Luce
Respiratory distress continues to be a major cause of neonatal morbidity. Current neonatal practice recommends the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in the immediate resuscitation and continued support of neonates of all gestations with clinical manifestations of respiratory distress. Despite the many short- and long-term benefits of nCPAP, many neonatal care units have met resistance in its routine use. Although there have been numerous recent publications investigating the use and outcomes of various modes of nCPAP delivery, surfactant administration, mechanical ventilation, and other forms of noninvasive respiratory support (high-flow nasal cannula, nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation), there has been a relative lack of publications addressing the practical bedside care of infants managed on nCPAP...
January 1, 2018: Neonatal Network: NN
Mihaela S Stefan, Patrick Eckert, Bogdan Tiru, Jennifer Friderici, Peter K Lindenauer, Jay S Steingrub
OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) between 2008 and 2014 in patients 18 years or older at a community teaching hospital. METHODS: Yearly utilization rates of HFNC, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) were calculated among admissions with a set of cardiopulmonary diagnoses (heart failure, COPD, asthma or pneumonia). RESULTS: Among the 41,711 admissions with at least one of the above cardiopulmonary condition, HFNC was utilized in 1,128 or 27...
February 15, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
Pierre Singer, Sornwichate Rattanachaiwong
Treating respiratory distress is a priority when managing critically ill patients. Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is increasingly used as a tool to prevent endotracheal intubation. Providing oral or enteral nutritional support during NIV may be perceived as unsafe because of the possible risk of aspiration so that these patients are frequently denied adequate caloric and protein intake. Newly available therapies, such as high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) may allow for more appropriate oral feeding.
February 6, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Srinivas Murki, Jayesh Singh, Chiragkumar Khant, Swarup Kumar Dash, Tejo Pratap Oleti, Percy Joy, Nandkishor S Kabra
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress...
January 23, 2018: Neonatology
Myoung Kyu Lee, Jaehwa Choi, Bonil Park, Bumjoon Kim, Seok Jeong Lee, Sang-Ha Kim, Suk Joong Yong, Eun Hee Choi, Won-Yeon Lee
INTRODUCTION: Severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is a significant event that results in substantial mortality. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of the high flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) therapy in severe AECOPD with moderate hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) compared to non-invasive ventilation (NIV). METHODS: The prospective observational trial was performed to compare the effectiveness between the HFNC and NIV in severe AECOPD with moderate hypercapnic ARF...
February 2, 2018: Clinical Respiratory Journal
Deog Kyeom Kim, Jungsil Lee, Ju Hee Park, Kwang Ha Yoo
Acute exacerbation(s) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) tend to be critical and debilitating events leading to poorer outcomes in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment modalities, and contribute to a higher and earlier mortality rate in COPD patients. Besides pro-active preventative measures intended to obviate acquisition of AECOPD, early recovery from severe AECOPD is an important issue in determining the long-term prognosis of patients diagnosed with COPD. Updated GOLD guidelines and recently published American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society clinical recommendations emphasize the importance of use of pharmacologic treatment including bronchodilators, systemic steroids and/or antibiotics...
January 24, 2018: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
Luca Cabrini, Giovanni Landoni, Martina Baiardo Radaelli, Omar Saleh, Carmine D Votta, Evgeny Fominskiy, Alessandro Putzu, Cézar Daniel Snak de Souza, Massimo Antonelli, Rinaldo Bellomo, Paolo Pelosi, Alberto Zangrillo
BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled studies evaluating any drug, technique or device aimed at improving the success rate or safety of tracheal intubation in the critically ill. METHODS: We searched PubMed, BioMed Central, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials and references of retrieved articles. Finally, pertinent reviews were also scanned to detect further studies until May 2017. The following inclusion criteria were considered: tracheal intubation in adult critically ill patients; randomized controlled trial; study performed in Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department or ordinary ward; and work published in the last 20 years...
January 20, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
J C Zhang, F X Wu, L L Meng, C Y Zeng, Y Q Lu
Objective: To investigate and compare the effect and safety of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (HFNCO) and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) therapy after extubation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: All COPD patients subjected to mechanical ventilation in the Emergency Intensive Unit of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University during January 2015 to June 2016 were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups after extubation and HFNCO and NIV were adopted on each group respectively...
January 9, 2018: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
G H Mills
Postoperative pulmonary complications are a major determinant of outcome for patients and consume huge resources within hospital, particularly in critical care. Prediction and anticipation of postoperative pulmonary complications are vital for patient selection and, in some cases, for informed patient consent. Being able to assess the likelihood of postoperative pulmonary complications also allows research into methods to reduce them by allowing allocation of patients to the appropriate arms of research trials...
January 2018: Anaesthesia
Pratik Doshi, Jessica S Whittle, Michael Bublewicz, Joseph Kearney, Terrell Ashe, Russell Graham, Suesann Salazar, Terry W Ellis, Dianna Maynard, Rose Dennis, April Tillotson, Mandy Hill, Misha Granado, Nancy Gordon, Charles Dunlap, Sheldon Spivey, Thomas L Miller
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We compare high-velocity nasal insufflation, a form of high-flow nasal cannula, with noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in the treatment of undifferentiated respiratory failure with respect to therapy failure, as indicated by requirement for endotracheal intubation or cross over to the alternative therapy. METHODS: This was a multicenter, randomized trial of adults presenting to the emergency department (ED) with respiratory failure requiring noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation...
January 5, 2018: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Antonio Di Mauro, Manuela Capozza, Sergio Cotugno, Silvio Tafuri, Francesco Paolo Bianchi, Federico Schettini, Raffaella Panza, Nicola Laforgia
BACKGROUND: Pulmonary disorders and respiratory failure represent one of the most common morbidities of preterm newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The use of nasal high-flow therapy (nHFT) has been more recently introduced into the NICUs as a non-invasive respiratory (NIV) support. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study to evaluate safety and effectiveness of nHFT as primary support for infants born < 29 weeks of gestation and/or VLBW presenting with mild Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS)...
December 28, 2017: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
Jean-Pierre Frat, Jean-Damien Ricard, Rémi Coudroy, René Robert, Stéphanie Ragot, Arnaud W Thille
INTRODUCTION: Endotracheal intubation in intensive care unit (ICU) is a procedure at high risk of life-threatening complications. Among them, severe oxygen desaturation, usually defined as a drop of pulse oxymetry (SpO2 ) below 80%, is the most common. Preoxygenation enables delaying oxygen desaturation occurring during apnea induced by anaesthetic drugs. Data suggest that non-invasive ventilation (NIV) or high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy could further increase PaO2 before intubation procedure and prevent oxygen desaturation episodes as compared with standard oxygen...
December 22, 2017: BMJ Open
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