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High Flow Nasal Ventilation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149868/can-high-flow-nasal-cannula-reduce-the-rate-of-reintubation-in-adult-patients-after-extubation-a-meta-analysis
#1
Yue-Nan Ni, Jian Luo, He Yu, Dan Liu, Bin-Miao Liang, Rong Yao, Zong-An Liang
BACKGROUND: The effects of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on adult patients after extubation remain controversial. We aimed to further determine the effectiveness of HFNC in comparison to noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and conventional oxygen therapy (COT). METHODS: The Pubmed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trails (CENTRAL) as well as the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) Web of Science were searched for all the controlled study comparing HFNC with NIPPV and COT in adult patients after extubation...
November 17, 2017: BMC Pulmonary Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29149690/a-modified-montpellier-protocol-for-intubating-intensive-care-unit-patients-is-associated-with-an-increase-in-first-pass-intubation-success-and-fewer-complications
#2
Keith A Corl, Christopher Dado, Ankita Agarwal, Nader Azab, Tim Amass, Sarah J Marks, Mitchell M Levy, Roland C Merchant, Jason Aliotta
BACKGROUND: The Montpellier protocol for intubating patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with a decrease in intubation-related complications. We sought to determine if implementation of a simplified version of the Montpellier protocol that removed selected components and allowed for a variety of pre-oxygenation modalities increased first-pass intubation success and reduced intubation-related complications. METHODS: A prospective pre/post-comparison of a modified Montpellier protocol in two medical and one medical/surgical/cardiac ICU within a hospital system...
November 10, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29144160/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-in-adults-an-evidence-based-assessment
#3
Matthew G Drake
High flow nasal cannula oxygenation has distinct advantages over other oxygen devices due to its unique effects on respiratory physiology. In particular, adjustable oxygen delivery and flow-dependent carbon dioxide clearance from the upper airway reduce work of breathing and can better match inspiratory demand during respiratory distress. Historically, few studies had evaluated whether the physiologic effects of these devices translated into clinical benefit. However, recent publications have begun to address this knowledge gap...
November 16, 2017: Annals of the American Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29099420/predictors-of-intubation-in-patients-with-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-treated-with-a-noninvasive-oxygenation-strategy
#4
Jean-Pierre Frat, Stéphanie Ragot, Rémi Coudroy, Jean-Michel Constantin, Christophe Girault, Gwénael Prat, Thierry Boulain, Alexandre Demoule, Jean-Damien Ricard, Keyvan Razazi, Jean-Baptiste Lascarrou, Jérôme Devaquet, Jean-Paul Mira, Laurent Argaud, Jean-Charles Chakarian, Muriel Fartoukh, Saad Nseir, Alain Mercat, Laurent Brochard, René Robert, Arnaud W Thille
OBJECTIVES: In patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, noninvasive ventilation and high-flow nasal cannula oxygen are alternative strategies to conventional oxygen therapy. Endotracheal intubation is frequently needed in these patients with a risk of delay, and early predictors of failure may help clinicians to decide early. We aimed to identify factors associated with intubation in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure treated with different noninvasive oxygenation techniques...
November 2, 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29066588/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-on-expiratory-pressure-and-ventilation-in-infant-pediatric-and-adult-models
#5
Katie R Nielsen, Laura E Ellington, Alan J Gray, Larissa I Stanberry, Lincoln S Smith, Robert M DiBlasi
BACKGROUND: Heated and humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a widely used form of respiratory support; however, data regarding optimal flows for a given patient size or disease state are lacking. A comprehensive study of the physiologic effects of HFNC is needed to better understand the mechanisms of action. The objective of the current study was to quantify the effect of HFNC settings in age-specific, anatomically correct nasal airways and spontaneously breathing lung models...
October 24, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29037221/high-flow-oxygen-via-nasal-cannulae-in-patients-with-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#6
Murdoch Leeies, Eric Flynn, Alexis F Turgeon, Bojan Paunovic, Hal Loewen, Rasheda Rabbani, Ahmed M Abou-Setta, Niall D Ferguson, Ryan Zarychanski
BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of high-flow oxygen via nasal cannulae (HFNC) compared to non-invasive ventilation (NIV) and/or standard oxygen in patients with acute, hypoxemic respiratory failure. METHODS: We reviewed randomized controlled trials from CENTRAL, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Scopus and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to February 2016), conference proceedings, and relevant article reference lists...
October 16, 2017: Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28970662/dual-oxygen-therapy-in-patient-on-bilevel-positive-airway-pressure-prevented-invasive-mechanical-ventilation
#7
Amarjeet Kumar, Lalit Kumar, Chandni Sinha, Neeraj Kumar, Umesh Kumar Bhadani
During noninvasive bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) ventilation it is found that several times patients are unable to maintain oxygen saturation and develop breathing difficulty despite its high setting and high oxygen flow, further management requires invasive positive pressure mechanical ventilation. Increasing oxygen concentration inside the BiPAP mask using nasal cannula with addition of another flow meter not only increase oxygen saturation but also make the patient more comfortable and prevent intubation and its complications...
September 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28947043/does-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-improve-outcome-in-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#8
REVIEW
Si-Ming Lin, Kai-Xiong Liu, Zhi-Hong Lin, Pei-Hong Lin
INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the efficacy of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in the rate of intubation and mortality for patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. METHODS: We searched Pubmed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for relevant studies. Two reviewers extracted data and reviewed the quality of the studies independently. The primary outcome was the rate of intubation; secondary outcome was mortality in the hospital. Study-level data were pooled using a random-effects model when I2 was >50% or a fixed-effects model when I2 was <50%...
October 2017: Respiratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28936951/-preliminary-evaluation-of-sequential-therapy-by-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-following-endotracheal-tube-extubation-in-mechanically-ventilated-patients
#9
Zhengfang Zhu, Yuhao Liu, Qixing Wang, Sheng Wang
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and effect of sequential treatment by the heated humidified high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) in mechanically ventilated patients following endotracheal tube extubation. METHODS: A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted. Forty-nine patients with the sequential treatment after tracheal intubation extraction admitted to Department of Critical Care Medicine of Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital from January 1st to December 31st 2016 were enrolled...
September 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28935428/predictive-factors-for-the-outcome-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-a-pediatric-intensive-care-unit-is-the-spo2-fio2-ratio-useful
#10
Fulya Kamit Can, Ayşe Berna Anil, Murat Anil, Neslihan Zengin, Fatih Durak, Caner Alparslan, Zeynep Goc
OBJECTIVES: To determine the predictive factors for the outcome of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively included all patients with acute respiratory distress/failure aged 1month to 18years who were admitted to the PICU between January 2015 and May 2016 and treated with HFNC as a primary support and for postextubation according to our pre-established protocol. HFNC failure was defined as the need for escalation to non-invasive ventilation (NIV) or invasive mechanical ventilation (MV)...
September 6, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922269/extubation-failure-is-associated-with-increased-mortality-following-first-stage-single-ventricle-reconstruction-operation
#11
Thomas Scodellaro, Jane M McKenzie, Yves d'Udekem, Warwick Butt, Siva P Namachivayam
OBJECTIVES: To identify the prevalence, causes, risk factors, and outcomes associated with extubation failure following first stage single ventricle reconstruction surgery. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis of neonates who underwent a first stage single ventricle reconstruction operation. Extubation failure was defined as endotracheal reintubation within 48 hours of first extubation attempt. SETTING: The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne...
September 15, 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28904810/nasal-high-flow-treatment-in-preterm-infants
#12
REVIEW
Calum T Roberts, Kate A Hodgson
Nasal High Flow (HF) is a mode of 'non-invasive' respiratory support for preterm infants, with several potential modes of action, including generation of distending airway pressure, washout of the nasopharyngeal dead space, reduction of work of breathing, and heating and humidification of inspired gas. HF has several potential advantages over continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the most commonly applied form of non-invasive support, such as reduced nasal trauma, ease of use, and infant comfort, which has led to its rapid adoption into neonatal care...
2017: Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870355/mechanical-ventilation-state-of-the-art
#13
REVIEW
Tài Pham, Laurent J Brochard, Arthur S Slutsky
Mechanical ventilation is the most used short-term life support technique worldwide and is applied daily for a diverse spectrum of indications, from scheduled surgical procedures to acute organ failure. This state-of-the-art review provides an update on the basic physiology of respiratory mechanics, the working principles, and the main ventilatory settings, as well as the potential complications of mechanical ventilation. Specific ventilatory approaches in particular situations such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are detailed along with protective ventilation in patients with normal lungs...
September 2017: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870157/ten-important-articles-on-noninvasive-ventilation-in-critically-ill-patients-and-insights-for-the-future-a-report-of-expert-opinions
#14
A Cortegiani, V Russotto, M Antonelli, E Azoulay, A Carlucci, G Conti, A Demoule, M Ferrer, N S Hill, S Jaber, P Navalesi, P Pelosi, R Scala, C Gregoretti
BACKGROUND: Noninvasive ventilation is used worldwide in many settings. Its effectiveness has been proven for common clinical conditions in critical care such as cardiogenic pulmonary edema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations. Since the first pioneering studies of noninvasive ventilation in critical care in the late 1980s, thousands of studies and articles have been published on this topic. Interestingly, some aspects remain controversial (e.g. its use in de-novo hypoxemic respiratory failure, role of sedation, self-induced lung injury)...
September 4, 2017: BMC Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28830913/risk-factors-for-respiratory-decompensation-among-healthy-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#15
Nina M Dadlez, Nora Esteban-Cruciani, Asama Khan, Lindsey C Douglas, Yi Shi, William N Southern
BACKGROUND: Although most children with bronchiolitis only require supportive care, some decompensate and require ventilatory support. We examined predictors of respiratory decompensation among hospitalized children to identify which patients may benefit from expectant monitoring. METHODS: We examined children ≤24 months old with bronchiolitis admitted to the general infant and toddler floor. Children with pneumonia or comorbidities were excluded. Demographic and clinical characteristics were abstracted from a clinical database and medical records...
September 2017: Hospital Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28828372/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-ventilation-in-the-management-of-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure
#16
REVIEW
Jean-Pierre Frat, Rémi Coudroy, Nicolas Marjanovic, Arnaud W Thille
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is a recent technique delivering a high flow of heated and humidified gas. HFNC is simpler to use and apply than noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and appears to be a good alternative treatment for hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF). HFNC is better tolerated than NIV, delivers high fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2), generates a low level of positive pressure and provides washout of dead space in the upper airways, thereby improving mechanical pulmonary properties and unloading inspiratory muscles during ARF...
July 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28820175/noninvasive-mechanical-ventilation-in-early-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome
#17
Alice Grassi, Giuseppe Foti, John G Laffey, Giacomo Bellani
Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) has a well-‑established role in the treatment of acute-‑on-‑chronic respiratory failure and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Its role in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure has been increasingly investigated, but its impact on the management and outcome of the subset of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still to be determined. ARDS could be a risk factor for NIV failure, and in these patients, delayed endotracheal intubation can lead to an increased mortality...
September 29, 2017: Polish Archives of Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807988/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-versus-intermittent-noninvasive-ventilation-in-obese-subjects-after-cardiothoracic-surgery
#18
François Stéphan, Laurence Bérard, Saida Rézaiguia-Delclaux, Priscilla Amaru
BACKGROUND: Obese patients are considered at risk of respiratory failure after cardiothoracic surgery. High-flow nasal cannula has demonstrated its non-inferiority after cardiothoracic surgery compared to noninvasive ventilation (NIV), which is the recommended treatment in obese patients. We hypothesized that NIV was superior to high-flow nasal cannula for preventing or resolving acute respiratory failure after cardiothoracic surgery in this population. METHODS: We performed a post hoc analysis of a randomized, controlled trial...
August 14, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28806218/hypoxemic-patients-with-bilateral-infiltrates-treated-with-high-flow-nasal-cannula-present-a-similar-pattern-of-biomarkers-of-inflammation-and-injury-to-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-patients
#19
MULTICENTER STUDY
Marina García-de-Acilu, Judith Marin-Corral, Antonia Vázquez, Laura Ruano, Mònica Magret, Ricard Ferrer, Joan R Masclans, Oriol Roca
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether patients with acute hypoxemia and bilateral opacities treated with high-flow nasal cannula and acute respiratory distress syndrome patients who were directly mechanically ventilated are similar in terms of lung epithelial, endothelial, and inflammatory biomarkers. DESIGN: Prospective, multicenter study. SETTING: ICUs at three university tertiary hospitals. PATIENTS: Intubated and nonintubated patients admitted to the ICU with acute hypoxemia (PaO2/FIO2 ≤ 300) and bilateral opacities...
November 2017: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28794144/nasal-high-flow-therapy-a-novel-treatment-rather-than-a-more-expensive-oxygen-device
#20
REVIEW
Eleni Ischaki, Ioannis Pantazopoulos, Spyros Zakynthinos
Nasal high flow is a promising novel oxygen delivery device, whose mechanisms of action offer some beneficial effects over conventional oxygen systems. The administration of a high flow of heated and humidified gas mixture promotes higher and more stable inspiratory oxygen fraction values, decreases anatomical dead space and generates a positive airway pressure that can reduce the work of breathing and enhance patient comfort and tolerance. Nasal high flow has been used as a prophylactic tool or as a treatment device mostly in patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure, with the majority of studies showing positive results...
September 30, 2017: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
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