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High Flow Nasal Ventilation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28645982/a-multicentre-randomised-controlled-non-inferiority-trial-comparing-nasal-high-flow-with-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-as-primary-support-for-newborn-infants-with-early-respiratory-distress-born-in-australian-non-tertiary-special-care-nurseries
#1
Brett J Manley, Calum T Roberts, Gaston R B Arnolda, Ian M R Wright, Louise S Owen, Kim M Dalziel, Jann P Foster, Peter G Davis, Adam G Buckmaster
INTRODUCTION: Nasal high-flow (nHF) therapy is a popular mode of respiratory support for newborn infants. Evidence for nHF use is predominantly from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). There are no randomised trials of nHF use in non-tertiary special care nurseries (SCNs). We hypothesise that nHF is non-inferior to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) as primary support for newborn infants with respiratory distress, in the population cared for in non-tertiary SCNs. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The HUNTER trial is an unblinded Australian multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial...
June 23, 2017: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601264/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-in-emergency-department-patients-with-cardiogenic-pulmonary-edema-a%C3%A2-randomized-controlled-trial
#2
Onlak Makdee, Apichaya Monsomboon, Usapan Surabenjawong, Nattakarn Praphruetkit, Wansiri Chaisirin, Tipa Chakorn, Chairat Permpikul, Phakphoom Thiravit, Tanyaporn Nakornchai
STUDY OBJECTIVE: High-flow nasal cannula is a new method for delivering high-flow supplemental oxygen for victims of respiratory failure. This randomized controlled trial compares high-flow nasal cannula with conventional oxygen therapy in emergency department (ED) patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. METHODS: We conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial in the ED of Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Patients aged 18 years or older with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were randomly assigned to receive either conventional oxygen therapy or high-flow nasal cannula...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546373/noninvasive-respiratory-support-in-infants-and-children
#3
Katherine L Fedor
CPAP and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) offer an alternative to intubation and mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute and chronic respiratory disorders commonly encountered in infants and children. There are many distinct challenges associated with the application, management, and safety of CPAP and NIV in the pediatric population. This review attempts to identify indications, contraindications, management strategies, and safety measures associated with the application of CPAP or NIV delivery in children...
June 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544665/humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-in-bronchiolitis-reduces-need-for-invasive-ventilation-but-not-intensive-care-admission
#4
Chong Tien Goh, Lynette J Kirby, David N Schell, Jonathan R Egan
AIM: To describe the changes to paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission patterns and ventilation requirements for children with bronchiolitis following the introduction of humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen outside the PICU. METHODS: Retrospective study comparing patients <24 months of age with a discharge diagnosis of bronchiolitis admitted to the PICU. A comparison was made between those before humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen use (year 2008) to those immediately following the introduction of humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen use (year 2011) and those following further consolidation of humidified high-flow nasal cannula oxygen use outside the PICU (year 2013)...
May 23, 2017: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544539/intensive-care-unit-admissions-and-ventilation-support-in-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#5
Ed Oakley, Vi Chong, Meredith Borland, Jocelyn Neutze, Natalie Phillips, David Krieser, Stuart Dalziel, Andrew Davidson, Susan Donath, Kim Jachno, Mike South, Amanda Fry, Franz E Babl
OBJECTIVES: To describe the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, type of ventilation support provided and risk factors for ICU admission in infants with bronchiolitis. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records and Australia and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) registry data for infants 2-12 months old admitted with bronchiolitis. SETTING: Seven Australian and New Zealand hospitals. These infants were prospectively identified through the comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis (CRIB) study between 2009 and 2011...
May 19, 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28534235/nasal-high-flow-in-management-of-children-with-status-asthmaticus-a-retrospective-observational-study
#6
Florent Baudin, Alexandra Buisson, Blandine Vanel, Bruno Massenavette, Robin Pouyau, Etienne Javouhey
BACKGROUND: Asthma is the most common obstructive airway disease in children and adults. Nasal high flow (NHF) is a recent device that is now used as a primary support for respiratory distress. Several studies have reported use of NHF as a respiratory support in status asthmaticus; however, there are no data to recommend such practice. We therefore conducted this preliminary study to evaluate NHF therapy for children with status asthmaticus admitted to our PICU in order to prepare a multicentre randomized controlled study...
December 2017: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28524026/-high-flow-nasal-cannulae-oxygen-in-patients-with-respiratory-failure-a-meta-analysis
#7
Weigang Yue, Zhigang Zhang, Caiyun Zhang, Liping Yang, Jufang He, Yuying Hou, Ying Tang, Jinhui Tian
OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate the efficacy of high-flow nasal cannulae oxygen (HFNC) in patients with respiratory failure. METHODS: Computerized PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, CNKI, CBM, VIP, Wanfang Database up to March 31st, 2017, all published available randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies about HFNC therapy for patients with respiratory failure were searched. The control group was treated with face mask oxygen therapy (FM) or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV), while the experimental group was treated with HFNC...
May 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523583/respiratory-support-after-extubation-noninvasive-ventilation-or-high-flow-nasal-cannula-as-appropriate
#8
Tommaso Mauri, Giacomo Grasselli, Samir Jaber
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Annals of Intensive Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28505486/respiratory-support-techniques-to-avoid-desaturation-in-critically-ill-patients-requiring-endotracheal-intubation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#9
REVIEW
Vincenzo Russotto, Andrea Cortegiani, Santi Maurizio Raineri, Cesare Gregoretti, Antonino Giarratano
PURPOSE: To evaluate which respiratory support method for critically ill patients undergoing endotracheal intubation (ETI) is associated with less desaturation. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus and CINAHL databases. We included randomized (RCT) and non-randomized (non-RCT) studies investigating any method of respiratory support before/during ETI compared to a reference control. RESULTS: Apneic oxygenation (ApOx) was the most commonly investigated respiratory support technique for critically ill patients undergoing intubation (4 RCTs, 358 patients)...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28462226/preventive-post-extubation-high-flow-nasal-oxygen-therapy-versus-non-invasive-ventilation-a-substitutive-or-a-complementary-ventilatory-strategy
#10
EDITORIAL
Christophe Girault, Gaëtan Béduneau, Dorothée Carpentier, Benoît Misset
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28459412/-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-patients-after-trachea-extubation
#11
Jiawei Shen, Youzhong An
Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is one primary cause of intensive care unit (ICU) admittance, which is usually treated with intubation and mechanical ventilation in order to maintain a necessary ventilation and oxygenation function. After the remove of trachea tube, available oxygenation supports include nasal cannula, venturi mask, non-invasive ventilator and high flow nasal cannula (HFNC). In this article we reviewed the physiological mechanism related to HFNC therapy and trails about the application of HFNC in extubated patients...
January 2017: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28445240/evaluation-of-a-pediatric-early-warning-score-across-different-subspecialty-patients
#12
Nathan P Dean, J B Fenix, Michael Spaeder, Amanda Levin
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of a Pediatric Early Warning Score to predict deterioration in different subspecialty patient populations. DESIGN: Single center, retrospective cohort study. Patients were classified into five groups: 1) cardiac; 2) hematology/oncology/bone marrow transplant; 3) surgical; 4) neurologic; and 5) general medical. The relationship between the Pediatric Early Warning Score and unplanned ICU transfer requiring initiation of specific ICU therapies (intubation, high-flow nasal cannula, noninvasive ventilation, inotropes, or aggressive fluid hydration within 12 hr of transfer) was evaluated...
April 25, 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28442633/positive-end-expiratory-pressure-effect-of-3-high-flow-nasal-cannula-devices
#13
Jing-Chao Luo, Mei-Shan Lu, Zhi-Hong Zhao, Wei Jiang, Biao Xu, Li Weng, Tong Li, Bin Du
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is supposed to provide additional PEEP compared with conventional oxygen therapy. However, the exact determinants of this PEEP effect are unclear. We investigated the factors that might affect the PEEP and compared PEEP performance among 3 HFNC devices. METHODS: Three available HFNC devices were evaluated: the AIRVO 2 device and 2 mechanical ventilators (SV300 and Monnal T75). A device consisting of a test lung (5600i) and an airway model (AMT(IE)) was used to simulate spontaneous breathing...
April 25, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429603/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-ventilation-on-reintubation-rate-in-adult-patients-after-extubation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#14
Hua-Wei Huang, Xiu-Mei Sun, Zhong-Hua Shi, Guang-Qiang Chen, Lu Chen, Jan O Friedrich, Jian-Xin Zhou
PURPOSE: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on reintubation in adult patients. PROCEDURES: Ovid Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched up to November 1, 2016, for RCTs comparing HFNC versus conventional oxygen therapy (COT) or noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in adult patients after extubation. The primary outcome was reintubation rate, and the secondary outcomes included complications, tolerance and comfort, time to reintubation, length of stay, and mortality...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407823/-application-of-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-neonates-with-meconium-aspiration-syndrome-and-pulmonary-hypertension-after-extubation
#15
Xiao-Yan Gao, Lin Feng, Yu-Fen Qiu, Xin-Nian Pan
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical value of humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) as a respiratory support after extubation by comparing it with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in neonates with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). METHODS: A total of 78 neonates with MAS and PPHN were randomly administered with HHFNC or NCPAP immediately after extubation. The following indices were compared between the two groups: blood gas parameters, duration of noninvasive ventilation, rate of extubation failure, and incidence of complications, such as nasal damage, abdominal distension, and intraventricular hemorrhage...
April 2017: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400685/republication-all-india-difficult-airway-association-2016-guidelines-for-tracheal-intubation-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#16
Sheila Nainan Myatra, Syed Moied Ahmed, Pankaj Kundra, Rakesh Garg, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Apeksh Patwa, Amit Shah, Ubaradka S Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Jeson Rajan Doctor, Dilip K Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Jigeeshu Vasishtha Divatia
Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often lifesaving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with under evaluation of the airway and suboptimal response to preoxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA) proposes a stepwise plan for safe management of the airway in critically ill patients...
March 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399118/feasibility-and-physiological-effects-of-non-invasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-niv-nava-in-preterm-infants
#17
Christopher Gibu, Phillip Cheng, Raymond J Ward, Benjamin Castro, Gregory P Heldt
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilator Assist (NIV-NAVA) was introduced to our clinical practice via a pilot and a randomized observational study to assess its safety, feasibility, and short term physiological effects. METHODS: The pilot protocol applied NIV-NAVA to 11 infants on nasal CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), or nasal IMV (NIMV), in multiple 2-4 h periods of NIV-NAVA for comparison. This provided the necessary data to design a randomized, controlled observational cross-over study in 8 additional infants to compare the physiological effects of NIV-NAVA to NIMV during 2-hour steady state conditions...
April 11, 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393433/nasal-high-flow-oxygen-delivery-in-children-with-abnormal-airways
#18
Susan Humphreys, Derek Rosen, Tessa Housden, Julia Taylor, Andreas Schibler
BACKGROUND: Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange has been shown to safely prolong the safe apnea time in well children post induction of anesthesia and is rapidly becoming a new standard for apneic oxygenation in adults. The same oxygenation technique is described as nasal high flow and can be used in infants and children at risk of apnea during anesthesia. AIM: We investigated the use of nasal high flow oxygen delivery during anesthesia in children with abnormal airways requiring tubeless airway assessment or surgery...
June 2017: Paediatric Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366356/comparison-of-effort-of-breathing-for-infants-on-nasal-modes-of-respiratory-support
#19
Asavari Kamerkar, Justin Hotz, Rica Morzov, Christopher J L Newth, Patrick A Ross, Robinder G Khemani
OBJECTIVE: To directly compare effort of breathing between high flow nasal cannula (HFNC), nasal intermittent mechanical ventilation (NIMV), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). STUDY DESIGN: This was a single center prospective cross-over study for patients <6 months in the cardiothoracic or pediatric intensive care unit receiving nasal noninvasive respiratory support after extubation. We measured effort of breathing using esophageal manometry with pressure-rate product (PRP) on all 3 modes...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361072/high-flow-nasal-cannula-is-superior-to-noninvasive-ventilation-to-prevent-reintubation
#20
EDITORIAL
Masaji Nishimura
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Annals of Translational Medicine
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