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High Flow Nasal Ventilation

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28096239/skin-to-skin-care-in-preterm-infants-receiving-respiratory-support-does-not-lead-to-physiological-instability
#1
Laila Lorenz, Jennifer A Dawson, Hannah Jones, Susan E Jacobs, Jeanie L Cheong, Susan M Donath, Peter G Davis, C Omar F Kamlin
OBJECTIVE: Providing skin-to-skin care (SSC) to preterm infants is standard practice in many neonatal intensive care units. There are conflicting reports on the stability of oxygen saturation (SpO2) during SSC, which may create a barrier to a wider implementation of SSC to infants receiving respiratory support. Regional cerebral oxygenation (rcO2) measured using near-infrared spectroscopy can serve as a surrogate parameter for cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption. We hypothesised that rcO2 during SSC would be similar to standard care in preterm infants receiving respiratory support...
January 17, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089816/can-high-flow-nasal-cannula-reduce-the-rate-of-endotracheal-intubation-in-adult-patients-with-acute-respiratory-failure-compared-with-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-positive-pressure-ventilation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#2
Yue-Nan Ni, Jian Luo, He Yu, Dan Liu, Ni Zhong, Jiangli Cheng, Bin-Miao Liang, Zong-An Liang
BACKGROUND: The effects of high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on adult patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) are controversial. We aimed to further determine the effectiveness of HFNC in reducing the rate of endotracheal intubation in adult patients with ARF by comparison to noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) and conventional oxygen therapy (COT). METHODS: The Pubmed, Embase, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) as well as the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) Web of Science were searched for all the controlled studies that compared HFNC with NIPPV and COT in adult patients having ARF...
January 13, 2017: Chest
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28054235/heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-for-prevention-of-extubation-failure-in-preterm-infants
#3
Sasivimon Soonsawad, Buranee Swatesutipun, Anchalee Limrungsikul, Pracha Nuntnarumit
OBJECTIVES: To compare extubation failure rate between the heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) groups. METHODS: Intubated infants with gestational age (GA) <32 wk, who were ready to extubate, were randomized to receive respiratory support with either CPAP or HHHFNC after extubation. In CPAP group, nasal mask CPAP with preset pressure and fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) equal to positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and FiO2 of ventilator before extubation was applied...
January 5, 2017: Indian Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28009154/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-work-in-progress-in-respiratory-critical-care
#4
Annia Schreiber, Fabiano DI Marco, Fulvio Braido, Paolo Solidoro
After a planned extubation, the re-occurrence of acute respiratory distress needing the restoration of invasive mechanical support is a severe phenomenon associated with several important consequences, including increased morbidity, Intensive Care Unit mortality, and an enormous financial burden. So far, the most commonly used techniques to ameliorate gas exchange in the postextubation period were low-flow oxygen therapy and non-invasive ventilation (NIV). High flows through nasal cannulae (HFNC) is a system which allows increased CO2 wash-out of anatomical dead space, positive nasopharyngeal pressure, a relatively constant FiO2, and an improvement of mucociliary function...
December 2016: Minerva Medica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003694/the-all-india-difficult-airway-association-2016-guidelines-for-tracheal-intubation-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#5
Sheila Nainan Myatra, Syed Moied Ahmed, Pankaj Kundra, Rakesh Garg, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Apeksh Patwa, Amit Shah, Ubaradka S Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Jeson Rajan Doctor, Dilip K Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Jigeeshu Vasishtha Divatia
Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often life-saving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with a suboptimal evaluation of the airway and limited oxygen reserves despite adequate pre-oxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU...
December 2016: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003556/a-comparison-of-different-techniques-for-interfacing-capnography-with-adult-and-pediatric-supplemental-oxygen-masks
#6
Justin S Phillips, Lance P Pangilinan, Earl R E Mangalindan, Joseph L Booze, Richard H Kallet
BACKGROUND: Accurately measuring the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2 ) in non-intubated patients is problematic due to dilution of expired CO2 at high O2 flows and mask designs that may either cause CO2 rebreathing or inadequately capture expired CO2. We evaluated the performance of 2 capnographic O2 masks (Cap-ONE and OxyMask) against a clinically expedient method using a standard O2 mask with a flow-directed nasal cannula used for capnography (CapnoLine) in a spontaneous breathing model of an adult and child under conditions of normal ventilation, hypoventilation, and hyperventilation...
January 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27997805/physiologic-effects-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure
#7
Tommaso Mauri, Cecilia Turrini, Nilde Eronia, Giacomo Grasselli, Carlo Alberto Volta, Giacomo Bellani, Antonio Pesenti
RATIONALE: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) improves the clinical outcomes of non-intubated acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) patients. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of HFNC on gas exchange, inspiratory effort, minute ventilation, end-expiratory lung volume, dynamic compliance and ventilation homogeneity in AHRF patients. METHODS: This was a prospective randomized cross-over study in non-intubated AHRF patients with PaO2/setFiO2 ≤300 mmHg admitted to the Intensive Care Unit...
December 20, 2016: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27940177/-use-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-infants-with-bronchiolitis-in-a-pediatric-emergency-department
#8
M Guimaraes, M Pomedio, M Viprey, L Kanagaratnam, K Bessaci
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) is a technique for noninvasive ventilation commonly used in pediatric intensive care units for respiratory distress, particularly in acute bronchiolitis. HFNC was introduced in the pediatric emergency department of the Reims university hospital for the treatment of infants with moderate to severe acute viral bronchiolitis. This retrospective observational study aimed to investigate the use of HFNC in a pediatric emergency ward, describing the groups of infants with acute viral bronchiolitis to be treated either with conventional oxygen therapy or with HFNC therapy...
January 2017: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27927115/experiences-of-caring-for-infants-with-severe-bronchiolitis
#9
(no author information available yet)
Background Common in children under two years, bronchiolitis is usually caused by respiratory syncytial virus (Jhawar 2003). Symptoms are usually self-limiting although some children develop respiratory distress requiring hospitalisation (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network 2006). Supplemental oxygen, fluid support and ventilator assistance may also be necessary. In cases of moderately severe bronchiolitis, oxygen can be delivered through a head box, but some hospitals deliver high-flow oxygen therapy with nasal prongs to treat respiratory distress...
December 8, 2016: Nursing Children and Young People
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918754/interventions-to-improve-rates-of-successful-extubation-in-preterm-infants-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#10
Kristin N Ferguson, Calum T Roberts, Brett J Manley, Peter G Davis
Importance: Clinicians aim to extubate preterm infants as early as possible, to minimize the risks of mechanical ventilation. Extubation is often unsuccessful owing to lung disease or inadequate respiratory drive. Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of interventions to improve rates of successful extubation in preterm infants. Data Sources: Searches were undertaken in PubMed and The Cochrane Library. Study Selection: The review was conducted using the methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines...
December 5, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27888983/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-non-invasive-ventilation-in-adults-with-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-a-systematic-review
#11
REVIEW
Chi Chan Lee, Dhruti Mankodi, Sameer Shaharyar, Sharmila Ravindranathan, Mauricio Danckers, Pablo Herscovici, Molly Moor, Gustavo Ferrer
INTRODUCTION: Humidified oxygen via a high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a form of supplemental oxygen therapy that has significant theoretical advantages over conventional oxygen therapy (COT). However, the clinical role of HFNC in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) has not been well established. This review compares the efficacy of HFNC with COT and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in patients with AHRF. METHODS: Studies reviewed were selected based on relevance from a systematic literature search conducted in Medline and EMBASE to include all published original research through May 2016...
December 2016: Respiratory Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27879385/fio2-in-an-adult-model-simulating-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy
#12
Yusuke Chikata, Mutsuo Onodera, Jun Oto, Masaji Nishimura
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC) is widely used for patients with acute respiratory failure. HFNC has a number of physiological effects. Although FIO2 is considered to be constant, because HFNC is an open system, FIO2 varies according to inspiratory flow, tidal volume (VT), and HFNC gas flow. We investigated the influence of HFNC gas flow and other respiratory parameters on FIO2 during HFNC. METHODS: We evaluated an HFNC system and, for comparison, a conventional oxygen therapy system...
November 22, 2016: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27879383/high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-critically-ill-subjects-with-or-at-risk-for-respiratory-failure-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#13
REVIEW
Wagner Luis Nedel, Caroline Deutschendorf, Edison Moraes Rodrigues Filho
High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen delivery has been gaining attention as an alternative means of respiratory support for critically ill patients, with recent studies suggesting equivalent outcomes when compared with other forms of oxygen therapy delivery. The main objective of this review was to extract current data about the efficacy of HFNC in critically ill subjects with or at risk for respiratory failure. We performed a systematic review of publications (from database inception to October 2015) that evaluated HFNC in critically ill subjects with or at risk for acute respiratory failure and performed a meta-analysis comparing HFNC with noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and with standard oxygen therapy regarding major outcomes: incidence of invasive mechanical ventilation and ICU mortality...
January 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27879381/pediatric-prolonged-mechanical-ventilation-considerations-for-definitional-criteria
#14
Michaël Sauthier, Louise Rose, Philippe Jouvet
BACKGROUND: A 2005 consensus conference led by the National Association for Medical Direction of Respiratory Care (NAMDRC) defined prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) for adults as invasive and/or noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) for ≥ 21 consecutive days for ≥ 6 h/d. In children, no such consensus definition exists. This results in substantial variability in definitional criteria, making study of the impact and outcomes of PMV across and within settings problematic. The objective of this work was to identify how PMV for children and neonates is described in the literature and to outline pediatric/neonatal considerations related to PMV, with the goal of proposing a pediatric/neonatal adaptation to the NAMDRC definition...
January 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856714/nasal-high-flow-reduces-dead-space
#15
Winfried Möller, Sheng Feng, Ulrike Domanski, Karl-Josef Franke, Gülnaz Celik, Peter Bartenstein, Sven Becker, Gabriele Meyer, Otmar Schmid, Oliver Eickelberg, Stanislav Tatkov, Georg Nilius
: Recent studies show that nasal high flow (NHF) therapy can support ventilation in patients with acute or chronic respiratory disorders. Clearance of dead space has been suggested as being the key mechanism of respiratory support with NHF therapy. The hypothesis of this study was that NHF in a dose-dependent manner can clear dead space of the upper airways from expired air and decrease rebreathing. The randomized crossover study involved 10 volunteers using scintigraphy with (81m)Krypton ((81m)Kr) gas during a breath-holding maneuver with closed mouth and in 3 nasally breathing tracheotomized patients by volumetric capnography and oximetry through sampling CO2 and O2 in the trachea and measuring the inspired volume with inductance plethysmography following NHF rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853329/high-flow-nasal-cannulae-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-in-neonates-with-respiratory-distress-syndrome-managed-with-insure-method-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#16
Maliheh Kadivar, Ziba Mosayebi, Nosrat Razi, Shahin Nariman, Razieh Sangsari
BACKGROUND: In recent years, various noninvasive respiratory support (NRS) of ventilation has been provided more in neonates. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of HFNC with NCPAP in post-extubation of preterm infants with RDS after INSURE method (intubation, surfactant, extubation). METHODS: A total of 54 preterm infants with RDS (respiratory distress syndrome) were enrolled in this study. Using a randomized sequence, they were assigned into two groups after INSURE method...
November 2016: Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27850664/1026-outcomes-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-and-noninvasive-positive-pressure-ventilation-in-bronchiolitis
#17
Jason Clayton, Bryan McKee, Katherine Slain, Alexandre Rotta, Steven Shein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27850636/998-global-and-regional-ventilation-during-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-patients-with-hypoxia
#18
Dong Hyun Lee, Chae-Man Lim, Younsuck Koh, Sang-Bum Hong, Jin Won Huh, Ga Jin Seo, Eun Young Kim, Hee Jung Seo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2016: Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27846872/challenges-on-non-invasive-ventilation-to-treat-acute-respiratory-failure-in-the-elderly
#19
REVIEW
Raffaele Scala
Acute respiratory failure is a frequent complication in elderly patients especially if suffering from chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases. Non-invasive mechanical ventilation constitutes a successful therapeutic tool in the elderly as, like in younger patients, it is able to prevent endotracheal intubation in a wide range of acute conditions; moreover, this ventilator technique is largely applied in the elderly in whom invasive mechanical ventilation is considered not appropriated. Furthermore, the integration of new technological devices, ethical issues and environment of treatment are still largely debated in the treatment of acute respiratory failure in the elderly...
November 15, 2016: BMC Pulmonary Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826324/respiratory-support-with-heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-preterm-infants
#20
REVIEW
Ga Won Jeon
The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has not decreased over the last decade. The most important way to decrease BPD is by weaning the patient from the ventilator as soon as possible in order to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury that underlies BPD, and by using a noninvasive ventilator (NIV). Use of a heated, humidified, high flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC), which is the most recently introduced NIV mode for respiratory support in preterm infants, is rapidly increasing in many neonatal intensive care units due to the technical ease of use without sealing, and the attending physician's preference compared to other NIV modes...
October 2016: Korean Journal of Pediatrics
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