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Ethics infectious disease

Ehsan Shamsi Gooshki, Raheleh Rezaei, Verina Wild
This paper presents a systematic literature review of studies that shed light on the health of migrants in Iran from the perspective of social justice. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and Iranian databases, including IranMedex, Magiran, and SID, in June 2012. All studies that were published until June 2012 describing the health status of migrants - including refugees - in Iran were included. The search results were categorisoyed according to an adapted version of the six dimensions of well-being in Madison Powers' and Ruth Faden's theory of social justice in health...
October 2016: Archives of Iranian Medicine
Roy K Philip, Marla Shapiro, Pauline Paterson, Steffen Glismann, Pierre Van Damme
To promote and sustain excellent vaccination coverage, while preserving the key core values of ethics, truth, transparency, and trust, the vaccine community should adopt modern digital communication strategies. This article summarizes our views - as experts in multidisciplinary field of vaccinology, which were presented at a satellite symposium held at the 33 European Society of Paediatric Infectious Disease (ESPID) conference in Leipzig, Germany, in May 2015. This article aims to suggest and recommend strategies to promote vaccination awareness and highlight proactive measures for building, maintaining, and enhancing trust in vaccination through innovative communication and evidence-based interaction with the end-user...
September 12, 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Scott Santibañez, Philip M Polgreen, Susan E Beekmann, Mark E Rupp, Carlos Del Rio
On September 30, 2014, the first US patient with Ebola virus disease was diagnosed. Hospitals and healthcare systems identified many complex issues that needed to be addressed to prepare for possible future outbreaks. Here we summarize themes identified in free text responses from a query of infectious disease physicians from the Infectious Disease Society of America's (IDSA) Emerging Infections Network (EIN) early in the domestic Ebola response and place them into the context of biopreparedness for possible future events...
September 2016: Health Security
(no author information available yet)
Routine childhood immunizations against infectious diseases are an integral part of our public health infrastructure. They provide direct protection to the immunized individual and indirect protection to children and adults unable to be immunized via the effect of community immunity. All 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico have regulations requiring proof of immunization for child care and school attendance as a public health strategy to protect children in these settings and to secondarily serve as a mechanism to promote timely immunization of children by their caregivers...
September 2016: Pediatrics
Fanmin Zeng, Xueli Sun, Bangxiang Yang, Hong Shen, Ling Liu
OBJECTIVE: This article adopts the perspective of psychosomatic medicine to present and test a theoretical model of the classification of clinical somatic symptoms. The theoretical model consists of four dimensions: emotional somatic symptoms, biological somatic symptoms, imaginative somatic symptoms, and cognitive somatic symptoms. METHOD: A clinical somatic symptom classification scale was developed according to the theoretical model. A total of 542 participants completed the clinical somatic symptoms classification scale...
2016: PloS One
Angela Huttner, Leonard Leibovici, Ursula Theuretzbacher, Benedikt Huttner, Mical Paul
The informed consent document is intended to provide basic rights to patients but often fails to do so. Patients' autonomy may be diminished by virtue of their illness; evidence shows that even patients who appear to be ideal candidates for understanding and granting informed consent rarely are-particularly those with acute infections. We argue that, for low-risk trials whose purpose is to evaluate non-experimental therapies or other measures toward which the medical community is in a state of equipoise, ethics committees should play a more active role in a more standardized fashion...
August 3, 2016: Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Merryn Voysey, Andrew J Pollard, Rafael Perera, Thomas R Fanshawe
INTRODUCTION: Disease incidence differs between males and females for some infectious or inflammatory diseases. Sex-differences in immune responses to some vaccines have also been observed, mostly to viral vaccines in adults. Little evidence is available on whether sex-differences occur in response to immunisation in infancy even though this is the age group in which most vaccines are administered. Factors other than sex, such as timing or coadministration of other vaccines, can also influence the immune response to vaccination...
2016: BMJ Open
Johanna T Crane, Theresa M Rossouw
In 2013, physician-researchers announced that a baby in Mississippi had been 'functionally cured' of HIV [Persaud, D., Gay, H., Ziemniak, C. F., Chen, Y. H., Piatak, M., Chun, T.-W., … Luzuriaga, K. (2013b, March). Functional HIV cure after very early ART of an infected infant. Paper presented at the 20th conference on retroviruses and opportunistic infections, Atlanta, GA]. Though the child later developed a detectable viral load, the case remains unprecedented, and trials to build on the findings are planned [National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases...
July 25, 2016: Global Public Health
Tim Allen, Melissa Parker
Recent debates about deworming school-aged children in East Africa have been described as the 'Worm Wars'. The stakes are high. Deworming has become one of the top priorities in the fight against infectious diseases. Staff at the World Health Organization, the Gates Foundation and the World Bank (among other institutions) have endorsed the approach, and school-based treatments are a key component of large-scale mass drug administration programmes. Drawing on field research in Uganda and Tanzania, and engaging with both biological and social evidence, this article shows that assertions about the effects of school-based deworming are over-optimistic...
September 2016: Journal of Biosocial Science
Rebecca L Walker
Should monkeys be used in painful and often deadly infectious disease research that may save many human lives? This is the challenging question that Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe, and Franklin G. Miller take on in their carefully argued and compelling article "The Ethics of Infection Challenges in Primates." The authors offer a nuanced and even-handed position that takes philosophical worries about nonhuman primate moral status seriously and still appreciates the very real value of such research for human welfare...
July 2016: Hastings Center Report
Anna Coutsoudis, Brodie Daniels, Eshia Moodley-Govender, Noluthando Ngomane, Linda Zako, Elizabeth Spooner, Photini Kiepiela, Shabashini Reddy, Louise Kuhn, Gita Ramjee
INTRODUCTION: No randomised controlled trial (RCT) has examined the efficacy of cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants during the breastfeeding period, in this new era of effective prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) prophylaxis. The efficacy of CTX prophylaxis has presently been demonstrated only in HIV-infected children. The absence of proven benefits in HEU breastfed infants associated with infectious diseases justifies an RCT as proposed...
2016: BMJ Open
Olivia L Champion, Sariqa Wagley, Richard W Titball
Mammals are widely used by microbiologists as a model host species to study infectious diseases of humans and domesticated livestock. These studies have been pivotal for our understanding of mechanisms of virulence and have allowed the development of diagnostics, pre-treatments and therapies for disease. However, over the past decade we have seen efforts to identify organisms which can be used as alternatives to mammals for these studies. The drivers for this are complex and multifactorial and include cost, ethical and scientific considerations...
October 2, 2016: Virulence
Daniel G Bausch, Amanda Rojek
The outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) that occurred from 2013 to 2016 in the West African countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, with imported cases to three neighboring African countries as well as to the United States and Europe, constituted a major humanitarian disaster. The outbreak numbered over 28,500 cases, more than 10 times the number cumulatively registered from all previous EVD outbreaks combined, with at least 11,000 deaths, and resulted in billions of dollars of lost economic growth to an already impoverished region...
June 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Ambar Mehta, Thomas C Quinn
INTRODUCTION: The Ebola epidemic in West Africa sparked many ethical and polarizing public health questions on how to adequately control transmission of the virus. These deliberations had and will continue to influence patients, healthcare workers, public perceptions of disease, and governmental responses. Such extensive and potential ramifications warranted an analysis of prior epidemics to sufficiently inform policy makers and prepare them and other authorities for future epidemics...
2016: Pathogens & Immunity
Sangita K Jindal, Richard G Rawlins, Charles H Muller, Erma Z Drobnis
According to the Americans with Disabilities Act (1990), couples with blood-borne viruses that lead to infectious disease cannot be denied fertility treatment as long as the direct threat to the health and safety of others can be reduced or eliminated by a modification of policies or procedures. Three types of infectious patients are commonly discussed in the context of fertility treatment: those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C or hepatitis B. Seventy-five per cent of hepatitis C or HIV positive men and women are in their reproductive years, and these couples look to assisted reproductive techniques for risk reduction in conceiving a pregnancy...
August 2016: Reproductive Biomedicine Online
Jeong-Sil Choi, Ji-Soo Kim
BACKGROUND: Whenever there has been a worldwide contagious disease outbreak, there have been reports of infection and death of healthcare workers. Particularly because emergency nurses have contact with patients on the front line, they experience ethical problems in nursing while struggling with infectious diseases in an unfavorable environment. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore emergency nurses' ethical problems and to identify factors influencing these problems during the outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus in Korea...
May 23, 2016: Nursing Ethics
Paul H Mason, Annika C Sweetland, Greg J Fox, Shaun Halovic, Thu Anh Nguyen, Guy B Marks
OBJECTIVE: This opinion piece encourages mental health researchers and clinicians to engage with mental health issues among tuberculosis patients in the Asia-Pacific region in a culturally appropriate and ethical manner. The diversity of cultural contexts and the high burden of tuberculosis throughout the Asia-Pacific presents significant challenges. Research into tuberculosis and mental illness in this region is an opportunity to develop more nuanced models of mental illness and treatment, while simultaneously contributing meaningfully to regional tuberculosis care and prevention...
May 20, 2016: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Kátia Regina Gandra Lafetá, Hercílio Martelli Júnior, Marise Fagundes Silveira, Lívia Máris Ribeiro Paranaíba
OBJECTIVE: To identify and to describe cases of congenital and maternal syphilis reported and not reported in a Brazilian medium-sized city. METHODS: This is a descriptive and retrospective study, which evaluated 214 medical records of pregnant women and newborns. It began with the identification of epidemiological notification records, followed by active search in maternity evaluating all records that did show positive nontreponemal serology and records of the reference service in infectious diseases in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais, from 2007 to 2013...
March 2016: Revista Brasileira de Epidemiologia, Brazilian Journal of Epidemiology
N M Zetola, C Modongo, P K Moonan, E Click, J E Oeltmann, J Shepherd, A Finlay
INTRODUCTION: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is transmitted from person to person via airborne droplet nuclei. At the community level, Mtb transmission depends on the exposure venue, infectiousness of the tuberculosis (TB) index case and the susceptibility of the index case's social network. People living with HIV infection are at high risk of TB, yet the factors associated with TB transmission within communities with high rates of TB and HIV are largely undocumented. The primary aim of the Kopanyo study is to better understand the demographic, clinical, social and geospatial factors associated with TB and multidrug-resistant TB transmission in 2 communities in Botswana, a country where 60% of all patients with TB are also infected with HIV...
2016: BMJ Open
Eileen F Baker, John C Moskop, Joel M Geiderman, Kenneth V Iserson, Catherine A Marco, Arthur R Derse
Emergency physicians frequently interact with law enforcement officers and patients in their custody. As always, the emergency physician's primary professional responsibility is to promote patient welfare, and his or her first duty is to the patient. Emergency physicians should treat criminals, suspects, and prisoners with the same respect and attention they afford other patients while ensuring the safety of staff, visitors, and other patients. Respect for patient privacy and protection of confidentiality are of paramount importance to the patient-physician relationship...
May 4, 2016: Annals of Emergency Medicine
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