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three-dimensional printing

Stefan Kramel, Greg A Voth, Saskia Tympel, Federico Toschi
We introduce a new particle shape which shows preferential rotation in three dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. We call these particles chiral dipoles because they consist of a rod with two helices of opposite handedness, one at each end. 3D printing is used to fabricate these particles with a length in the inertial range and their rotations are tracked in a turbulent flow between oscillating grids. High aspect ratio chiral dipoles preferentially align with their long axis along the extensional eigenvectors of the strain rate tensor, and the helical ends respond to the extensional strain rate with a mean spinning rate that is nonzero...
October 7, 2016: Physical Review Letters
Marco Hernández-Enríquez, Salvatore Brugaletta, David Andreu, Glòria Macià-Muñoz, Mariona Castrejón-Subirá, Silvia Fernández-Suelves, Mar Hernández-Obiols, Ana Paula Dantas, Xavier Freixa, Victoria Martin-Yuste, Oscar Camara, Manel Sabaté
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging
Tae Suk Oh, Woo Shik Jeong, Taik Jin Chang, Kyung S Koh, Jong Woo Choi
BACKGROUND: It is difficult to restore original orbital contours because of their complex 3-dimensional structure. Moreover, slight implant malpositioning can result in enophthalmos or other complications. The authors describe our experience of using individualized prebent titanium-Medpor mesh implants and stereolithographic modeling in a series of patients who underwent orbital wall reconstruction. METHODS: A consecutive series of 104 patients with orbital fractures received computer simulation-designed prebent titanium-Medpor mesh implants insertion...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Fang Zhang, WenMing Hong, Yan Guo, QianYing Guo, XiaoPeng Hu
BACKGROUND: Microsurgery is a common treatment of brainstem tumors. However, misdirection, vascular damage, nerves injuries, paralysis, even death are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less experienced operators. This study was aimed to validate the accuracy of multimodal neuronavigation during microsurgery resection of brainstem tumors. METHODS: Ten patients with brainstem tumors underwent preoperative MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, computed tomography, three-dimensional print, and images loaded into the neuronavigation platform were used for its segmentation and preoperative planning...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Karthik Balakrishnan, Shelagh Cofer, Jane M Matsumoto, Joseph A Dearani, R Paul Boesch
Three-dimensional printed models are increasingly used in medicine and surgery, but applications of these models in the planning of operative procedures is not well described. In particular, their benefits have not been documented in complex, multiservice, high-risk operations. We describe five cases of complex pediatric tracheal reconstruction for which three-dimensional models had specific benefits in planning as well as in education of trainees, operating room staff, and patient families. We also describe our method for producing models so that others can adopt the technology if desired...
October 18, 2016: Laryngoscope
H Chen, T Zhao, Y Wang, Y C Sun
OBJECTIVE: To establish a digital method for production of custom trays for edentulous jaws using fused deposition modeling (FDM) based on three-dimensional (3D) scans of primary jaw impressions, and to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy. METHODS: A red modeling compound was used to make a primary impression of a standard maxillary edentulous plaster model. The plaster model data and the primary impression tissue surface data were obtained using a 3D scanner. In the Gemomagic 2012 software, several commands were used, such as interactive drawing curves, partial filling holes, local offset, bodily offset, bodily shell, to imitate clinical procedures of drawing tray boundary, filling undercut, buffer, and generating the tray body...
October 18, 2016: Beijing da Xue Xue Bao. Yi Xue Ban, Journal of Peking University. Health Sciences
Samer Toume, Amit Gefen, Daphne Weihs
We observed that radially stretching cell monolayers at a low level (3%) increases the rate at which they migrate to close a gap formed by in vitro injury. Wound healing has been shown to accelerate in vivo when deformations are topically applied, for example, by negative pressure wound therapy. However, the direct effect of deformations on cell migration during gap closure is still unknown. Thus, we have evaluated the effect of radially applied, sustained (static) tensile strain on the kinematics of en mass cell migration...
October 17, 2016: International Wound Journal
Zhongmin Wang, Yuhao Liu, Yu Xu, Chuanyu Gao, Yan Chen, Hongxing Luo
BACKGROUND: WE AIMED TO PROSPECTIVELY EVALUATE THE: use of 3-dimensional printing (3DP) for the percutaneous transcatheter closure of a secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) with rim deficiency less than 5 mm. METHODS: Patients with ASD were scanned using multi-slice computed tomography to acquire raw data for virtual 3DP reconstruction models. Different ASD occluders were tried on the 3DP models to select the optimal size for intraoperative use. The patients were followed up 1 month postoperatively, and 3DP models were again manufactured to observe the operative effects...
October 17, 2016: Cardiology Journal
Shruti Digholkar, V N V Madhav, Jayant Palaskar
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the flexural strength and microhardness of provisional restorative materials fabricated utilizing rapid prototyping (RP), Computer Assisted Designing and Computer Assisted Milling (CAD-CAM) and conventional method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty specimens of dimensions 25 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm (ADA-ANSI specification #27) were fabricated each using: (1) Three dimensional (3D) printed light-cured micro-hybrid filled composite by RP resin group, (2) a milled polymethyl methacrylate (CH) using CAD-CAM (CC resin group), and (3) a conventionally fabricated heat activated polymerized CH resin group...
October 2016: Journal of Indian Prosthodontic Society
Carla Severini, Antonio Derossi
Within the concept of personalized nutrition we want to introduce the terms of "customized food formula" which refers to the preparation (at home) or the production (at industrial level) of new food formulations having nutrients and functional compounds necessary to prevent diseases or to reduce the risk for each subject (or subjects category) who exhibit a susceptibility to diseases. Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a group of technologies of growing interest able to produce, slice by slice, materials with any desired shape, dimension, and structure properties...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Katherine R Kavanagh, Valerie Cote, Yvonne Tsui, Simon Kudernatsch, Donald R Peterson, Tulio A Valdez
OBJECTIVE: Simulation to acquire and test technical skills is an essential component of medical education and residency training in both surgical and nonsurgical specialties. High-quality simulation education relies on the availability, accessibility, and reliability of models. The objective of this work was to describe a practical pediatric laryngeal model for use in otolaryngology residency training. Ideally, this model would be low-cost, have tactile properties resembling human tissue, and be reliably reproducible...
October 12, 2016: Laryngoscope
L Sim
The purpose of this study was to evaluate if MED610 3D printed material can be used as a surrogate for acrylic in the manufacturing of a replacement insert used in an eye plaque brachytherapy applicator. Measurement of the dose distributions from a standard acrylic insert were compared with dose obtained from MED610 3D printed replica using GafChromic(®) EBT3 films. The study used a 15 mm Radiation Oncology Physics and Engineering Services, Australia (ROPES) type eye plaque applicator loaded with I-125 (model 6711) seeds...
October 11, 2016: Australasian Physical & Engineering Sciences in Medicine
Samuel R Barber, Elliott D Kozin, Matthew Dedmon, Brian M Lin, Kyuwon Lee, Sumi Sinha, Nicole Black, Aaron K Remenschneider, Daniel J Lee
INTRODUCTION: Surgical simulators are designed to improve operative skills and patient safety. Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery (TEES) is a relatively new surgical approach with a slow learning curve due to one-handed dissection. A reusable and customizable 3-dimensional (3D)-printed endoscopic ear surgery simulator may facilitate the development of surgical skills with high fidelity and low cost. Herein, we aim to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost and reusable 3D-printed TEES simulator...
November 2016: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Thorsten Jentzsch, Lazaros Vlachopoulos, Philipp Fürnstahl, Daniel A Müller, Bruno Fuchs
BACKGROUND: Sarcomas are associated with a relatively high local recurrence rate of around 30 % in the pelvis. Inadequate surgical margins are the most important reason. However, obtaining adequate margins is particularly difficult in this anatomically demanding region. Recently, three-dimensional (3-D) planning, printed models, and patient-specific instruments (PSI) with cutting blocks have been introduced to improve the precision during surgical tumor resection. This case series illustrates these modern 3-D tools in pelvic tumor surgery...
September 21, 2016: World Journal of Surgical Oncology
David H Ballard, Jeffery A Weisman, Udayabhanu Jammalamadaka, Karthik Tappa, J Steven Alexander, F Dean Griffen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 7, 2016: Surgery
P Flood, L Alvarez, E G Reynaud
Three-dimensional (3D) tissue models are invaluable tools that can closely reflect the in vivo physiological environment. However, they are usually difficult to develop, have a low throughput and are often costly; limiting their utility to most laboratories. The recent availability of inexpensive additive manufacturing printers and open source 3D design software offers us the possibility to easily create affordable 3D cell culture platforms. To demonstrate this, we established a simple, inexpensive and robust method for producing arrays of free-floating epithelial micro-tissues...
October 11, 2016: Biofabrication
Yi-Cheun Yeh, Christopher B Highley, Liliang Ouyang, Jason A Burdick
Three-dimensional (3D) printed scaffolds have great potential in biomedicine; however, it is important that we are able to design such scaffolds with a range of diverse properties towards specific applications. Here, we report the extrusion-based 3D printing of biodegradable and photocurable acrylated polyglycerol sebacate (Acr-PGS) to fabricate scaffolds with elastic properties. Two Acr-PGS macromers were synthesized with varied molecular weights and viscosity, which were then blended to obtain photocurable macromer inks with a range of viscosities...
October 7, 2016: Biofabrication
Wenjing Su, Benjamin S Cook, Yunnan Fang, Manos M Tentzeris
As the needs for low-cost rapidly-produced microfluidics are growing with the trend of Lab-on-a-Chip and distributed healthcare, the fully inkjet-printing of microfluidics can be a solution to it with numerous potential electrical and sensing applications. Inkjet-printing is an additive manufacturing technique featuring no material waste and a low equipment cost. Moreover, similar to other additive manufacturing techniques, inkjet-printing is easy to learn and has a high fabrication speed, while it offers generally a great planar resolution down to below 20 µm and enables flexible designs due to its inherent thin film deposition capabilities...
October 7, 2016: Scientific Reports
Kyle K VanKoevering, Scott J Hollister, Glenn E Green
Importance: Three-dimensional (3-D) printing is an exponentially growing technology that enables the use of a patient's image data to create patient-specific models, devices, and implants. Three-dimensional printing, developed in the 1980s, has emerged in the past decade with the potential to create new paradigms in personalized medicine. Observations: The field of otolaryngology has advanced many current and evolving future medical applications of 3-D printing...
October 6, 2016: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
Eric MacDonald, Ryan Wicker
Layer-by-layer deposition of materials to manufacture parts-better known as three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing-has been flourishing as a fabrication process in the past several years and now can create complex geometries for use as models, assembly fixtures, and production molds. Increasing interest has focused on the use of this technology for direct manufacturing of production parts; however, it remains generally limited to single-material fabrication, which can limit the end-use functionality of the fabricated structures...
September 30, 2016: Science
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