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Corollary discharge

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29735707/flight-motor-networks-modulate-primary-olfactory-processing-in-the-moth-manduca-sexta
#1
Phillip D Chapman, Rex Burkland, Samual P Bradley, Benjamin Houot, Victoria Bullman, Andrew M Dacks, Kevin C Daly
Nervous systems must distinguish sensory signals derived from an animal's own movements (reafference) from environmentally derived sources (exafference). To accomplish this, motor networks producing reafference transmit motor information, via a corollary discharge circuit (CDC), to affected sensory networks, modulating sensory function during behavior. While CDCs have been described in most sensory modalities, none have been observed projecting to an olfactory pathway. In moths, two mesothoracic to deutocerebral histaminergic neurons (MDHns) project from flight sensorimotor centers in the mesothoracic neuromere to the antennal lobe (AL), where they provide the sole source of histamine (HA), but whether they represent a CDC is unknown...
May 7, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29683518/the-function-and-failure-of-sensory-predictions
#2
REVIEW
Sonia Bansal, Judith M Ford, Miriam Spering
Humans and other primates are equipped with neural mechanisms that allow them to automatically make predictions about future events, facilitating processing of expected sensations and actions. Prediction-driven control and monitoring of perceptual and motor acts are vital to normal cognitive functioning. This review provides an overview of corollary discharge mechanisms involved in predictions across sensory modalities and discusses consequences of predictive coding for cognition and behavior. Converging evidence now links impairments in corollary discharge mechanisms to neuropsychiatric symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions...
April 23, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29537912/response-properties-of-saccade-related-neurons-of-the-post-arcuate-premotor-cortex
#3
Eleftherios Neromyliotis, Adonis K Moschovakis
We studied the phasic saccade related discharges of single neurons (S neurons) of the premotor cortex of female rhesus monkeys, mostly in the caudal bank of the arcuate sulcus. As described in previous work from our laboratory (Neromyliotis and Moschovakis, 2017b), some of these cells emitted phasic discharges for coordinated movements of the eyes and hand as well as for movements of either effector executed in isolation (motor equivalence -Meq). Other cells (S), did not emit phasic discharges for hand movements unaccompanied by saccades...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29529412/transsaccadic-perception-deficits-in-schizophrenia-reflect-the-improper-internal-monitoring-of-eye-movement-rather-than-abnormal-sensory-processing
#4
Sonia Bansal, Laurence C Jayet Bray, Barbara L Schwartz, Wilsaan M Joiner
BACKGROUND: Symptoms of psychosis in schizophrenia reflect disturbances in sense of agency-difficulty distinguishing internally from externally generated sensory and perceptual experiences. One theory attributes these anomalies to a disruption in corollary discharge (CD), an internal copy of generated motor commands used to distinguish self-movement-generated sensations from externally generated stimulation. METHODS: We used a transsaccadic shift detection paradigm to examine possible deficits in CD and sense of agency based on the ability to perceive visual changes in 31 schizophrenia patients (SZPs) and 31 healthy control subjects...
February 2018: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29510116/a-new-perspective-on-predictive-motor-signaling
#5
REVIEW
Hans Straka, John Simmers, Boris P Chagnaud
Adaptive behavior relies on complex neural processing in multiple interacting networks of both motor and sensory systems. One such interaction employs intrinsic neuronal signals, so-called 'corollary discharge' or 'efference copy', that may be used to predict the sensory consequences of a specific behavioral action, thereby enabling self-generated (reafferent) sensory information and extrinsic (exafferent) sensory inflow to be dissociated. Here, by using well-established examples, we seek to identify the distinguishing features of corollary discharge and efference copy within the framework of predictive motor-to-sensory system coordination...
March 5, 2018: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29453689/sustained-sensorimotor-control-as-intermittent-decisions-about-prediction-errors-computational-framework-and-application-to-ground-vehicle-steering
#6
Gustav Markkula, Erwin Boer, Richard Romano, Natasha Merat
A conceptual and computational framework is proposed for modelling of human sensorimotor control and is exemplified for the sensorimotor task of steering a car. The framework emphasises control intermittency and extends on existing models by suggesting that the nervous system implements intermittent control using a combination of (1) motor primitives, (2) prediction of sensory outcomes of motor actions, and (3) evidence accumulation of prediction errors. It is shown that approximate but useful sensory predictions in the intermittent control context can be constructed without detailed forward models, as a superposition of simple prediction primitives, resembling neurobiologically observed corollary discharges...
February 16, 2018: Biological Cybernetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29346747/sensorimotor-integration-for-decision-making-how-the-worm-steers
#7
Harris S Kaplan, Manuel Zimmer
Animals' movements actively shape their perception and subsequent decision making. In this issue of Neuron, Liu et al. (2018) show how C. elegans nematodes steer toward an odorant: a dedicated interneuron class integrates oscillatory olfactory signals, generated by head swings, with corollary discharge motor signals.
January 17, 2018: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29299605/corollary-discharge-and-psychosis-origin-of-the-model-reply
#8
Andrea Raballo, Eva Gebhardt, Michele Poletti
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2018: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29299603/corollary-discharge-and-psychosis-origin-of-the-model
#9
Irwin Feinberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2018: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29249953/learning-peri-saccadic-remapping-of-receptive-field-from-experience-in-lateral-intraparietal-area
#10
Xiao Wang, Yan Wu, Mingsha Zhang, Si Wu
Our eyes move constantly at a frequency of 3-5 times per second. These movements, called saccades, induce the sweeping of visual images on the retina, yet we perceive the world as stable. It has been suggested that the brain achieves this visual stability via predictive remapping of neuronal receptive field (RF). A recent experimental study disclosed details of this remapping process in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP), that is, about the time of the saccade, the neuronal RF expands along the saccadic trajectory temporally, covering the current RF (CRF), the future RF (FRF), and the region the eye will sweep through during the saccade...
2017: Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29247717/higher-order-thalamic-nuclei-resting-network-connectivity-in-early-schizophrenia-and-major-depressive-disorder
#11
Jacob Penner, Elizabeth A Osuch, Betsy Schaefer, Jean Théberge, Richard W J Neufeld, Ravi S Menon, Nagalingam Rajakumar, James A Bourne, Peter C Williamson
The pulvinar and the mediodorsal (MDN) nuclei of the thalamus are higher order nuclei which have been implicated in directed effort and corollary discharge systems. We used seed-based resting fMRI to examine functional connectivity to bilateral pulvinar and MDN in 24 schizophrenic patients (SZ), 24 major depressive disorder patients (MDD), and 24 age-matched healthy controls. SZ had less connectivity than controls between the left pulvinar and precuneus, left ventral-lateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), and superior and medial-frontal regions, between the right pulvinar and right frontal pole, and greater connectivity between the right MDN and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC)...
February 28, 2018: Psychiatry Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28975192/corollary-discharge-self-agency-and-the-neurodevelopment-of-the-psychotic-mind
#12
Michele Poletti, Eva Gebhardt, Andrea Raballo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 20, 2017: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916520/rubrocerebellar-feedback-loop-isolates-the-interposed-nucleus-as-an-independent-processor-of-corollary-discharge-information-in-mice
#13
Christy S Beitzel, Brenda D Houck, Samantha M Lewis, Abigail L Person
Understanding cerebellar contributions to motor coordination requires deeper insight into how the output structures of the cerebellum, the cerebellar nuclei, integrate their inputs and influence downstream motor pathways. The magnocellular red nucleus (RNm), a brainstem premotor structure, is a major target of the interposed nucleus (IN), and has also been described in previous studies to send feedback collaterals to the cerebellum. Because such a pathway is in a key position to provide motor efferent information to the cerebellum, satisfying predictions about the use of corollary discharge in cerebellar computations, we studied it in mice of both sexes...
October 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28747471/co-option-of-a-motor-to-sensory-histaminergic-circuit-correlates-with-insect-flight-biomechanics
#14
Phillip D Chapman, Samual P Bradley, Erica J Haught, Kassandra E Riggs, Mouaz M Haffar, Kevin C Daly, Andrew M Dacks
Nervous systems must adapt to shifts in behavioural ecology. One form of adaptation is neural exaptation, in which neural circuits are co-opted to perform additional novel functions. Here, we describe the co-option of a motor-to-somatosensory circuit into an olfactory network. Many moths beat their wings during odour-tracking, whether walking or flying, causing strong oscillations of airflow around the antennae, altering odour plume structure. This self-induced sensory stimulation could impose selective pressures that influence neural circuit evolution, specifically fostering the emergence of corollary discharge circuits...
July 26, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28642572/disrupted-pursuit-compensation-during-self-motion-perception-in-early-alzheimer-s-disease
#15
Jingru Wang, Xiaojun Guo, Xianbo Zhuang, Tuanzhi Chen, Wei Yan
Our perception of the world is remarkably stable despite of distorted retinal input due to frequent eye movements. It is considered that the brain uses corollary discharge, efference copies of signals sent from motor to visual regions, to compensate for distortions and stabilize visual perception. In this study, we tested whether patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have impaired corollary discharge functions as evidenced by reduced compensation during the perception of optic flow that mimics self-motion in the environment...
June 22, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532350/corollary-discharge-and-oculomotor-proprioception-cortical-mechanisms-for-spatially-accurate-vision
#16
Linus D Sun, Michael E Goldberg
A classic problem in psychology is understanding how the brain creates a stable and accurate representation of space for perception and action despite a constantly moving eye. Two mechanisms have been proposed to solve this problem: Herman von Helmholtz's idea that the brain uses a corollary discharge of the motor command that moves the eye to adjust the visual representation, and Sir Charles Sherrington's idea that the brain measures eye position to calculate a spatial representation. Here, we discuss the cognitive, neuropsychological, and physiological mechanisms that support each of these ideas...
October 14, 2016: Annual Review of Vision Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292639/oculomotor-prediction-a-window-into-the-psychotic-mind
#17
REVIEW
Katharine N Thakkar, Vaibhav A Diwadkar, Martin Rolfs
Psychosis - an impaired contact with reality - is a hallmark of schizophrenia. Many psychotic symptoms are associated with disruptions in agency - the sense that 'I' cause my actions. A failure to predict sensory consequences of one's own actions may underlie agency disturbances. Such predictions rely on corollary discharge (CD) signals, 'copies' of movement commands sent to sensory regions prior to action execution. Here, we make a case that the oculomotor system is a promising model for understanding CD in psychosis, building on advances in our understanding of the behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of CD associated with eye movements...
May 2017: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28025052/holding-visual-attention-for-400millionyears-a-model-of-tectum-and-torus-longitudinalis-in-teleost-fishes
#18
David P M Northmore
Only ray-finned fishes possess a torus longitudinalis (TL), a paired, elongated body attached to the medial margins of the optic tectum. Its granule cells project large numbers of fine fibers running laterally over adjacent tectum, synapsing excitatorily on the spiny dendrites of pyramidal cells. Sustained TL activity is evoked visuotopically by dark stimuli; TL bursting is a corollary discharge of saccadic eye movements. To suggest a function for this ancient structure, neural network models were constructed to show that: (1) pyramidal cells could form an attentional locus, selecting one out of several moving objects to track, but rapid image shifts caused by saccades disrupt tracking; (2) TL could supply both the pre-saccade position of a locus, and the shift predicted from a saccade so as to prime pyramidal dendrites at the target location, ensuring the locus stays with the attended object; (3) that the specific pattern of synaptic connections required for such predictive priming could be learned by an unsupervised rule; (4) temporal and spatial filtering of visual pattern input to TL allows learning from a complex scene...
February 2017: Vision Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003409/a-circuit-for-saccadic-suppression-in-the-primate-brain
#19
Rebecca A Berman, James Cavanaugh, Kerry McAlonan, Robert H Wurtz
Saccades should cause us to see a blur as the eyes sweep across a visual scene. Specific brain mechanisms prevent this by producing suppression during saccades. Neuronal correlates of such suppression were first established in the visual superficial layers of the superior colliculus (SC) and subsequently have been observed in cortical visual areas, including the middle temporal visual area (MT). In this study, we investigated suppression in a recently identified circuit linking visual SC (SCs) to MT through the inferior pulvinar (PI)...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956073/an-unintended-consequence-of-culture-change-in-va-community-living-centers
#20
Jill Harrison, Denise A Tyler, Renée R Shield, Whitney L Mills, Kristen E Morgan, Maxwell E Cutty, Danielle L Coté, Susan M Allen
OBJECTIVE: Although a growing body of evidence suggests that culture change and its corollary, person-centered care improves resident outcomes in the nursing home setting, little is known about the effect of culture change in a postacute setting in which patients receive skilled nursing and rehabilitation services for a relatively short period of time before returning home. DESIGN: Data for this study were collected as part of a larger project to understand the impact of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) policies to shift the mission of VHA Community Living Centers (CLCs) from long-stay custodial care to short-stay skilled nursing and rehabilitative care...
April 1, 2017: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
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