Read by QxMD icon Read

Medication mistake

Natasa M Milic, Srdjan Masic, Jelena Milin-Lazovic, Goran Trajkovic, Zoran Bukumiric, Marko Savic, Nikola V Milic, Andja Cirkovic, Milan Gajic, Mirjana Kostic, Aleksandra Ilic, Dejana Stanisavljevic
BACKGROUND: The scientific community increasingly is recognizing the need to bolster standards of data analysis given the widespread concern that basic mistakes in data analysis are contributing to the irreproducibility of many published research findings. The aim of this study was to investigate students' attitudes towards statistics within a multi-site medical educational context, monitor their changes and impact on student achievement. In addition, we performed a systematic review to better support our future pedagogical decisions in teaching applied statistics to medical students...
2016: PloS One
Hans Lehrach
Every human is unique. We differ in our genomes, environment, behavior, disease history, and past and current medical treatment-a complex catalog of differences that often leads to variations in the way each of us responds to a particular therapy. We argue here that true personalization of drug therapies will rely on "virtual patient" models based on a detailed characterization of the individual patient by molecular, imaging, and sensor techniques. The models will be based, wherever possible, on the molecular mechanisms of disease processes and drug action but can also expand to hybrid models including statistics/machine learning/artificial intelligence-based elements trained on available data to address therapeutic areas or therapies for which insufficient information on mechanisms is available...
September 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Nouf Al Saleem, Khaled Al-Surimi
Frequent, preventable medical errors can have an adverse effect on patient safety and quality as well as leading to wasted resources. In the laboratory, errors can occur at any stage of sample processing; pre-analytical, analytical, and post analytical stages. However evidence shows most of the laboratory errors occur during the pre-analytical stage. The receipt and processing of specimens is one of the main steps in the pre-analytical stage. Errors in this stage could be due to mislabeling, incorrect test entry and entering the wrong location, among other reasons...
2016: BMJ Quality Improvement Reports
Xiong Li, Jianwei Niu, Marimuthu Karuppiah, Saru Kumari, Fan Wu
Benefited from the development of network and communication technologies, E-health care systems and telemedicine have got the fast development. By using the E-health care systems, patient can enjoy the remote medical service provided by the medical server. Medical data are important privacy information for patient, so it is an important issue to ensure the secure of transmitted medical data through public network. Authentication scheme can thwart unauthorized users from accessing services via insecure network environments, so user authentication with privacy protection is an important mechanism for the security of E-health care systems...
December 2016: Journal of Medical Systems
Sara Modig, Cecilia Lenander, Nina Viberg, Patrik Midlöv
BACKGROUND: There is an urgent need to improve patient safety in the area of medication treatment among the elderly. The aim of this study was to explore which improvement needs and strengths, relating to medication safety, arise from a multi-professional intervention in primary care and further to describe and follow up on the agreements for change that were established within the intervention. METHODS: The SÄKLÄK project was a multi-professional intervention in primary care consisting of self-assessment, peer-review, feedback and written agreements for change...
October 4, 2016: BMC Family Practice
Megan Delisle, Ruby Grymonpre, Rebecca Whitley, Debrah Wirtzfeld
Clinical errors due to human mistakes are estimated to result in 400,000 preventable deaths per year. Strategies to improve patient safety often rely on healthcare workers' ability to speak up with concerns. This becomes difficult during critical decision-making as a result of conflicting opinions and power differentials, themes underrepresented in many interprofessional initiatives. These elements are prominent in our interprofessional initiative, namely Crucial Conversations. We sought to evaluate this initiative as an interprofessional learning (IPL) opportunity for pre-licensure senior healthcare students, as a way to foster interprofessional collaboration, and as a method of empowering students to vocalise their concerns...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Interprofessional Care
Y-W Sha, L Ding, J-X Wu, S-B Lin, X Wang, Z-Y Ji, P Li
Spermatozoa morphology, an important parameter in a semen specimen's potential fertility evaluation, is a significant factor for in vitro fertilisation in assisted reproductive technology. Eleven sterile men with headless spermatozoa, a type of human teratozoospermia, are presented. Their ejaculates' headless spermatozoa percentages were high with rare normal spermatozoa forms. Additionally, abnormal morphology (e.g. round-headed or microcephalic spermatozoa) was also found. Spermatozoa motility was somewhat affected, potentially because of the missing mitochondrial sheath at the sperm tail base...
October 6, 2016: Andrologia
Diana J Burgess, Sara E Burke, Brooke A Cunningham, John F Dovidio, Rachel R Hardeman, Yuefeng Hou, David B Nelson, Sylvia P Perry, Sean M Phelan, Mark W Yeazel, Michelle van Ryn
BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of evidence on how to train medical students to provide equitable, high quality care to racial and ethnic minority patients. We test the hypothesis that medical schools' ability to foster a learning orientation toward interracial interactions (i.e., that students can improve their ability to successfully interact with people of another race and learn from their mistakes), will contribute to white medical students' readiness to care for racial minority patients...
September 29, 2016: BMC Medical Education
Robert F Card
This paper builds upon previous work in which I argue that we should assess a provider's reasons for his or her objection before granting a conscientious exemption. For instance, if the medical professional's reasoned basis involves an empirical mistake, an accommodation is not warranted. This article poses and begins to address several deep questions about the workings of what I call a reason-giving view: What standard should we use to assess reasons? What policy should we adopt in order to evaluate the reasons offered by medical practitioners in support of their objections? I argue for a reasonability standard to perform the essential function of assessing reasons, and I offer considerations in support of a policy establishing conscientious objector status in medicine...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Medical Ethics
David B Larson, Lane F Donnelly, Daniel J Podberesky, Arnold C Merrow, Richard E Sharpe, Jonathan B Kruskal
In September 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published a report titled "Improving Diagnosis in Health Care," in which it was recommended that "health care organizations should adopt policies and practices that promote a nonpunitive culture that values open discussion and feedback on diagnostic performance." It may seem counterintuitive that a report addressing a highly technical skill such as medical diagnosis would be focused on organizational culture. The wisdom becomes clearer, however, when examined in the light of recent advances in the understanding of human error and individual and organizational performance...
September 27, 2016: Radiology
H Kingma, R van de Berg
Many medical doctors consider vertigo and dizziness as the major, almost obligatory complaints in patients with vestibular disorders. In this chapter, we will explain that vestibular disorders result in much more diverse and complex complaints. Many of these other complaints are unfortunately often misinterpreted and incorrectly classified as psychogenic. When we really understand the function of the vestibular system, it becomes quite obvious why patients with vestibular disorders complain about a loss of visual acuity, imbalance, fear of falling, cognitive and attentional problems, fatigue that persists even when the vertigo attacks and dizziness decreases or even disappears...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
L E Higham, W Ongeri, K Asena, M V Thrusfield
A mixed-method study was conducted in the Rift Valley of Kenya to characterise drug-dispensing practices amongst staff at animal health outlets and to explore perceptions of veterinary medicines amongst pastoralists and farmers. Forty structured questionnaires were administered to staff at animal health outlets, including franchise outlets of 'Sidai Africa Ltd.', and two focus group discussions were facilitated to explore the perceptions of local animal health services by a Maasai pastoralist group and a dairy farmer cooperative...
August 31, 2016: Tropical Animal Health and Production
Romaric Marcilly, Helen Monkman, Sidsel Villumsen, David Kaufman, Marie-Catherine Beuscart-Zephir
Medication alerting system use errors and lack of adoption are often attributed to usability issues. Previous work has used evidence from the literature to reveal usability principles specific to medication alerting systems and identify potential consequences of violating these principles. The current study sought to explore how best to convey these principles to designers and evaluators of these systems to facilitate their work. To this aim, a workshop with 19 participants was used to generate ideas and opinions on how to deliver these topic-specific design principles in a way that would be most helpful for them...
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Sina Aziz, Mehwash Kashif, Maaziya Aijaz
OBJECTIVE: To find out the frequency and type of English Grammar problems in original articles, submitted for publication in Annals of Abbasi Shaheed Hospital, Karachi. STUDY DESIGN: Across-sectional study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Department of Annals of Abbasi Shaheed Hospital and Karachi Medical and Dental College in January 2015. METHODOLOGY: The study evaluated 28 original research articles, published in Annals of Abbasi Shaheed Hospital and Karachi Medical and Dental College during January 2013 to December 2014, for the English language mistakes in the manuscripts...
August 2016: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
R Dettmeyer, C Reisenauer
With regard to jurisdiction, the Patients' Rights Act and the Medical Association's professional code of conduct in Germany, correct informed consent in a timely manner has to be assured by the physician. Omissions concerning informed consent may lead to conviction including compensation for damages and for pain and suffering if the patient is able to prove such omissions. Mistakes during treatment or gaps of the informed consent must not to be told to the patient, but facts must be correctly answered.
August 15, 2016: Der Urologe. Ausg. A
Palanisamy Sivanandy, Mari Kannan Maharajan, Kingston Rajiah, Tan Tyng Wei, Tan Wee Loon, Lim Chong Yee
BACKGROUND: Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use...
2016: Patient Preference and Adherence
Bobbi Jo H Yarborough, Scott P Stumbo, Shannon L Janoff, Micah T Yarborough, Dennis McCarty, Howard D Chilcoat, Paul M Coplan, Carla A Green
BACKGROUND: Opioid abuse and misuse are significant public health issues. The CDC estimated 72% of pharmaceutical-related overdose deaths in the US in 2012 involved opioids. While studies of opioid overdoses have identified sociodemographic characteristics, agents used, administration routes, and medication sources associated with overdoses, we know less about the context and life circumstances of the people who experience these events. METHODS: We analyzed interviews (n=87) with survivors of opioid overdoses or family members of decedents...
October 1, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Robert M Kaiser, Susan L Kaiser
As professionals in geriatric medicine and social work, we are caregivers for our widowed mother of 90 years, a woman with neurocognitive disorder and multiple medical conditions. She has had repeated, problematic encounters with the health care system over the past 4 years. Caring successfully for an aging parent requires a comprehensive understanding of her unique medical, psychological, and functional status; need for social support; and overall goals of care. Poor communication between and among clinical teams-and with patients and families-is ubiquitous...
August 6, 2016: Gerontologist
Itzhak Brook
The author, a practicing physician, was diagnosed with throat cancer and lost his vocal cords. He endured the side effects of radiation, repeated surgeries, and the effects of prolonged hospitalizations; confronted medical mistakes and discrimination after losing his vocal cords; and struggled to regain his speech and find new meaning and purpose for his life. Facing the hardship and trials of becoming a laryngectomee illustrated to him how dependent and helpless a patient can become. Being unable to speak, eat, and breathe normally, while dealing with a potentially terminal illness, makes the patient very vulnerable, both physically and emotionally...
2016: Rambam Maimonides Medical Journal
Irene Arida Slootweg
Teamwork among clinical teachers is essential for continuous improvement of postgraduate medical training. This thesis deconstructs teamwork in four studies, mostly based on qualitative research approaches and one study utilizes mixed methods. We found that clinical teachers do train residents, but individually rather than as a team. The programme directors as leaders focus more on teaching activities than on the collective ambition and mutual engagement of clinical teachers. During the teaching meetings, mistakes and conflicts are mainly discussed in a general sense and are often neither directed at the individual, nor result-oriented...
August 2016: Perspectives on Medical Education
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"