Read by QxMD icon Read

empathy and medical students

Mustafa Afifi
OBJECTIVE: To find the association of Empathy, Self-Efficacy, and/or Hope with readiness for lifelong learning among medical students. METHODS: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2016 at Ras Al-Khaimah Medical and Health Sciences University in the United Arab Emirates, and comprised medical students from all five years. A self-reporting questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data .Standard scales and analysis of variance test were used to compare the mean scores of different variables for different groups...
March 2018: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
José María Ariso
Most scholars agree that empathy is one of the keys for medical education, but it is not yet clear precisely how this term should be defined. Currently, the predominant tendency in this area consists in considering empathy within the context of narrative medicine or, more specifically, within the interaction theory instead of the simulation theory of empathy. A significant development of the interaction theory is "second-order empathy". After describing the outlines of this kind of empathy, I suggest that the practitioner should also inquire about the patient's certainties - in Wittgenstein's sense - in order the better to enrich and understand her narrative...
March 14, 2018: BMC Medical Education
Robson Aparecido Dos Santos Boni, Carlos Eduardo Paiva, Marco Antonio de Oliveira, Giancarlo Lucchetti, José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro Fregnani, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro Paiva
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and possible factors associated with the development of burnout among medical students in the first years of undergraduate school. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Barretos School of Health Sciences, Dr. Paulo Prata. A total of 330 students in the first four years of medical undergraduate school were invited to participate in responding to the sociodemographic and Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS) questionnaires...
2018: PloS One
Julie Youm, Warren Wiechmann
Purpose: This case study explored the use of Google Glass in a clinical examination scenario to capture the firstperson perspective of a standardized patient to provide formative feedback of students' communication and empathy skills "through the patient's eyes". Methods: During a three-year period between 2014-2017, third-year students enrolled in the Family Medicine clerkship participated in a Google Glass station during the summative clinical examination where standardized patients wore Google Glass to record an encounter focused on communication and empathy skills "through the patient's eyes"...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions
Rowan Hordijk, Kristin Hendrickx, Katja Lanting, Anne MacFarlane, Maaike Muntinga, Jeanine Suurmond
BACKGROUND: Medical students need to be trained in delivering diversity-responsive health care but unknown is what competencies teachers need. The aim of this study was to devise a framework of competencies for diversity teaching. METHODS: An open-ended questionnaire about essential diversity teaching competencies was sent to a panel. This resulted in a list of 74 teaching competencies, which was sent in a second round to the panel for rating. The final framework of competencies was approved by the panel...
February 28, 2018: Medical Teacher
Jennifer N Stojan, Eleanor Y Sun, Arno K Kumagai
PURPOSE: Educational approaches involving patient stories aim at enhancing empathy and patient-centered care; however, it is not known whether the influence of such programs on physician attitudes persists beyond medical school. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Family Centered Experience (FCE) paired preclinical medical students with patient families over two years and engaged students in reflective dialogs about the volunteers' stories. This study examined possible long-term influences on attitudes toward medicine and doctoring...
February 28, 2018: Medical Teacher
Jochanan Benbassat
Undergraduate clinical education follows the "bedside" tradition that exposes students to inpatients. However, the hospital learning environment has two main limitations. First, most inpatients require acute care, and students may complete their training without seeing patients with frequent non-emergent and chronic diseases that are managed in outpatient settings. Second, students rarely cope with diagnostic problems, because most inpatients are diagnosed in the community or the emergency room. These limitations have led some medical schools to offer longitudinal integrated clerkships in community settings instead of hospital block clerkship rotations...
February 24, 2018: Advances in Health Sciences Education: Theory and Practice
Daniel Skinner, Kyle Rosenberger
In response to changes in health care, American medical schools are transforming their curricula to cultivate empathy, promote professionalism, and increase cultural competency. Many scholars argue that an infusion of the humanities in premedical and medical training may help achieve these ends. This study analyzes Web-based messaging of Ohio's undergraduate institutions to assess premedical advising attitudes toward humanities-based coursework and majors. Results suggest that although many institutions acknowledge the humanities, most steer students toward science majors; strong advocates of the humanities tend to have religious or other special commitments, and instead of acknowledging the intrinsic value that the humanities might have for future physicians, most institutions promote the humanities because entrance exams now contain related material...
January 2018: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
D Jeffrey
The medical profession has adopted a cognitive model of empathy, or detached concern, in its professionalism and practice. As a consequence there is now an empathy gap which has been demonstrated by lapses in patient care in the UK. There may also be an empathy gap developing in medical students during their training. This paper argues for the adoption of a relational view of empathy which embraces emotional and moral dimensions of the concept, acknowledges the importance of the clinical context and prioritises the relationship between the doctor and patient...
September 2017: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
Anthony E Brenneman, Constance Goldgar, Karen J Hills, Jennifer H Snyder, Stephane P VanderMeulen, Steven Lane
Physician assistant (PA) admissions processes have typically given more weight to cognitive attributes than to noncognitive ones, both because a high level of cognitive ability is needed for a career in medicine and because cognitive factors are easier to measure. However, there is a growing consensus across the health professions that noncognitive attributes such as emotional intelligence, empathy, and professionalism are important for success in clinical practice and optimal care of patients. There is also some evidence that a move toward more holistic admissions practices, including evaluation of noncognitive attributes, can have a positive effect on diversity...
March 2018: Journal of Physician Assistant Education
S Claiborne Johnston
Artificial intelligence and other forms of information technology are only just beginning to change the practice of medicine. The pace of change is expected to accelerate as tools improve and as demands for analyzing a rapidly growing body of knowledge and array of data increase. The medical students of today will practice in a world where information technology is sophisticated and omnipresent. In this world, the tasks of memorization and analysis will be less important to them as practicing physicians. On the other hand, the non-analytical, humanistic aspects of medicine-most importantly, the art of caring-will remain a critical function of the physician, and facility with improving systems of care will be required...
February 13, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Marianna D LaNoue, Debra L Roter
OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationships between self-reported Empathy and the patient-centered communication patterns of physician trainees. METHODS: "Eighty-four 3rd year medical students completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE - student version) and had recordings of a single OSCE analyzed using the Roter Interactional Analysis System (RIAS). Correlation and regression were employed to explore the relationships among JSE total score, 3 JSE subscales, 10 composite codes of provider communication, and a summary 'patient centered communication' ratio, reflecting the balance of psychosocial and emotional to biomedical communication of the simulated patient and student...
January 29, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
Salvatore Mangione, Chayan Chakraborti, Giuseppe Staltari, Rebecca Harrison, Allan R Tunkel, Kevin T Liou, Elizabeth Cerceo, Megan Voeller, Wendy L Bedwell, Keaton Fletcher, Marc J Kahn
BACKGROUND: Literature, music, theater, and visual arts play an uncertain and limited role in medical education. One of the arguments often advanced in favor of teaching the humanities refers to their capacity to foster traits that not only improve practice, but might also reduce physician burnout-an increasing scourge in today's medicine. Yet, research remains limited. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that medical students with higher exposure to the humanities would report higher levels of positive physician qualities (e...
January 29, 2018: Journal of General Internal Medicine
Elizabeth Gaufberg, Lisette Dunham, Edward Krupat, Brent Stansfield, Charles Christianson, Susan Skochelak
Construct: Induction into the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) during medical school is recognized as an indicator of humanistic orientation and behavior. Various attitudes and interpersonal orientations including empathy and patient-centeredness have been posited to translate into behaviors constituting humanistic care. BACKGROUND: To our knowledge there has never been a longitudinal, multi-institutional empirical study of the attitudinal and interpersonal orientations correlated with GHHS membership status...
January 24, 2018: Teaching and Learning in Medicine
Bonny L Dickinson, Wendy Lackey, Maria Sheakley, Lisa Miller, Susan Jevert, Brandy Shattuck
Real patients offer unique opportunities to develop authentic, engaging, and transformative learning experiences for students. Patients are widely employed to teach clinical and interpersonal skills in the clerkship phase of their medical education (M3-M4), but have not been extensively included in the preclinical curriculum (M1-M2) when students are focused on acquiring foundational biomedical science knowledge. To maximize learning and help students connect foundational and clinical science concepts to real-world clinical problems, we involved a real patient in the creation and implementation of a case-based learning (CBL) activity in our preclinical curriculum...
March 1, 2018: Advances in Physiology Education
Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, Oscarina da Silva Ezequiel, Isabella Noceli de Oliveira, Alexander Moreira-Almeida, Giancarlo Lucchetti
BACKGROUND: The present study aims to investigate the effect of two educational strategies to teach geriatrics (flipped classroom-FL and traditional lectures-TR) in relation to a control group (no intervention) on students' competences. METHOD: An intervention study was conducted during the third year of medicine. Two different educational strategies (flipped classroom and traditional lectures) were incorporated into a theoretical-practical discipline of geriatrics...
January 21, 2018: Medical Teacher
Kirti Singh, Mainak Bhattacharyya, Vikas Veerwal, Arshi Singh
Purpose: To assess the role of an "empathy sensitizing module" (ESM) in ophthalmology postgraduates in promoting effective empathetic communication. Methodology: Thirty-nine ophthalmology postgraduates were taught effective empathetic communication using specially designed module, comprising of five illustrative role-plays. We evaluated the impact of the training by (a) self-assessment of empathy quotient by residents using Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE scale) before and 6 weeks after ESM training and (b) nonparticipant observation (NPO) by trained faculty in real-life settings over the next 4 months...
December 2017: International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research
Shaista M Saiyad, Swapnil J Paralikar, Anita P Verma
Context: Most vital areas of patient management such as empathy, professionalism, and ethics are lacking in fresh undergraduates. These areas are considered to be part of hidden curriculum, and as these are not formally taught, we lack competent medical graduates. Introduction of medical humanities (MH) early in the medical curriculum can help to inculcate required soft skills. Aims: This study aims to develop, administer, and evaluate MH module in 1st year MBBS students...
December 2017: International Journal of Applied and Basic Medical Research
Anirban Chatterjee, Rajkrishna Ravikumar, Satendra Singh, Pranjal Singh Chauhan, Manu Goel
Purpose: The purpose of the study is to assess the clinical empathy and various associated factors of a cohort of medical students spanning all semesters. Methods: A cross-sectional study to assess the empathy of all undergraduate medical students studying in a medical college in Delhi, was conducted using the Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Student version (JSE-S). Demographic data was obtained using a pre-tested, semi open-ended questionnaire. Results: A participation rate of 69...
December 27, 2017: Journal of Educational Evaluation for Health Professions
Hetty Cunningham, Delphine Taylor, Urmi A Desai, Samuel C Quiah, Benjamin Kaplan, Lorraine Fei, Marina Catallozzi, Boyd Richards, Dorene F Balmer, Rita Charon
The day-to-day rigors of medical education often preclude learners from gaining a longitudinal perspective on who they are becoming. Furthermore, the current focus on competencies, coupled with concerning rates of trainee burnout and a decline in empathy, have fueled the search for pedagogic tools to foster students' reflective capacity. In response, many scholars have looked to the tradition of narrative medicine to foster "reflective spaces" wherein holistic professional identity construction can be supported...
December 19, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"