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Pain , pediatrics, emergency

See Wan Tham, Tonya M Palermo, Amy Lewandowski Holley, Chuan Zhou, Audun Stubhaug, Anne-Sofie Furberg, Christopher Sivert Nielsen
Quantitative sensory testing (QST) has been used to characterize pain sensitivity in individuals with and without pain conditions. Research remains limited in pediatric populations, hindering the ability to expand the utility of QST toward its potential application in clinical settings and clinical predictive value. The aims of this study were to examine pain sensitivity using QST in adolescents with chronic pain compared to adolescents without chronic pain and identify predictors of pain sensitivity. A population-based study conducted from 2010 to 2011 provided data on 941 adolescents, 197 were classified as having chronic pain and 744 were classified without chronic pain...
September 15, 2016: Pain
Margaret J Livingstone, Cornelius B Groenewald, Jennifer A Rabbitts, Tonya M Palermo
BACKGROUND: Concerns regarding the safety of codeine have been raised. Cases of life-threatening respiratory depression and death in children have been attributed to codeine's polymorphic metabolic pathway. International health agencies recommend restricted use of codeine in children. Despite these recommendations, the epidemiology of codeine use among children remains unknown. AIMS: Our objective was to examine patterns of codeine use in the US among children. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of children of age 0-17 years from 1996 to 2013 in the US was performed...
October 25, 2016: Paediatric Anaesthesia
Yoshihiro Ohara, Hitoshi Ohto, Tetsunori Tasaki, Hideki Sano, Kazuhiro Mochizuki, Mitsuko Akaihata, Shogo Kobayashi, Tomoko Waragai, Masaki Ito, Mitsuaki Hosoya, Kenneth E Nollet, Kazuhiko Ikeda, Chitose Ogawa, Takahiro Kanno, Yayoi Shikama, Atsushi Kikuta
BACKGROUND: Pediatric apheresis for peripheral blood stem cell transplantation should be carried out with due concern for low corporeal blood volume and vulnerability to hypocalcemia-related complications, hypovolemic shock, and hypervolemic cardiac overload. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: We retrospectively investigated a total of 267 apheresis procedures from 1990 to 2013 on 93 children between 0 and 10 years old, including 89 patients and 4 healthy donors, with body weights of 6...
September 30, 2016: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Maa-Ohui Quarmyne, Wei Dong, Rodney Theodore, Sonia Anand, Vaughn Barry, Olufolake Adisa, Iris D Buchanan, James Bost, Robert C Brown, Clinton H Joiner, Peter A Lane
The clinical efficacy of hydroxyurea in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) has been well established. However, data about its clinical effectiveness in practice is limited. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness of hydroxyurea in a large pediatric population using a retrospective cohort, pre-post treatment study design to control for disease severity selection bias. The cohort included children with SCA (SS, Sβ(0) thalassemia) who received care at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) and who initiated hydroxyurea in 2009-2011...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Hematology
Marcos Prada-Arias, José Luis Vázquez, Ángel Salgado-Barreira, Javier Gómez-Veiras, Margarita Montero-Sánchez, José Ramón Fernández-Lorenzo
AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the biomarker fibrinogen (FB), along with the more traditional markers white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and C-reactive protein (CRP), to discriminate appendicitis from nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) in children. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated all children aged 5 to 15 years admitted for suspected appendicitis at an academic pediatric emergency department during 2 years...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Robert P Olympia, Robert Wilkinson, Jennifer Dunnick, Brendan J Dougherty, Debra Zauner
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to describe pediatric emergency department (ED) referrals from urgent care centers and to determine the percentage of referrals considered essential and serious. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted between April 2013 and April 2015 on patients younger than 21 years referred directly to an ED in central Pennsylvania from surrounding urgent care centers. Referrals were considered essential or serious based on investigations/procedures performed or medications/consultations received in the ED...
October 8, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Merritt D Kinon, Rani Nasser, Jonathan Nakhla, Rupen Desai, Jessica R Moreno, Reza Yassari, Carlos A Bagley
Pediatric emergency physicians must have a high clinical suspicion for atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation (AARS), particularly when a child presents with neck pain and an abnormal head posture without the ability to return to a neutral position. As shown in the neurosurgical literature, timely diagnosis and swift initiation of treatment have a greater chance of treatment success for the patient. However, timely treatment is complicated because torticollis can result from a variety of maladies, including: congenital abnormalities involving the C1-C2 joint or the surrounding supporting muscles and ligaments, central nervous system abnormalities, obstetric palsies from brachial plexus injuries, clavicle fractures, head and neck surgery, and infection...
October 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Lynn Babcock, Cody S Olsen, David M Jaffe, Julie C Leonard
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to ascertain potential factors associated with cervical spine injuries in children injured during sports and recreational activities. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter retrospective case-control study involving children younger than 16 years who presented to emergency departments after blunt trauma and underwent cervical spine radiography. Cases had cervical spine injury from sports or recreational activities (n = 179)...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Nariman A Nawar, Phyllis R Sawyer
BACKGROUND Segmental absence of intestinal musculature is a well described entity in premature infants. It presents with peritonitis, bowel perforation, and obstruction. The diagnosis is based on pathologic observation of absence of intestinal musculature. Researchers hypothesized that this entity is a result of a vascular accident during embryogenesis. However, segmental absence of intestinal musculature is no longer limited to the pediatric population. Recently, a few cases have been described in adults with and without significant vascular diseases...
October 17, 2016: American Journal of Case Reports
Bo Hyun Hwang, Younglim Kim, Gi-Bong Chae, Suk-Bae Moon
OBJECTIVE: The use of abdominal computed tomography (ACT) for nontraumatic abdominal pain in the pediatric emergency department is increasing to a remarkable extent, and every effort should be made to select patients who would benefit from ACT. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and laboratory predictors of positive CT yield in pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain. METHODS: The medical records of 739 pediatric patients who, between January 2009 and February 2014, underwent ACT for nontraumatic abdominal pain at the emergency department were reviewed retrospectively...
October 6, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
David Smith, High Cheek, Brenda Denson, Christopher M Pruitt
OBJECTIVE: Intranasal (IN) midazolam is a commonly prescribed medication for pediatric sedation and anxiolysis. One of its most frequently-encountered adverse effects is discomfort with administration. While it has been proposed that premedicating with lidocaine reduces this undesirable consequence, this combination has not been thoroughly researched. The objective of our study was to assess whether topical lidocaine lessens the discomfort associated with IN midazolam administration. METHODS: This was a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial performed in an urban, academic pediatric emergency department...
October 14, 2016: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Géraldine Layani, Richard Fleet, Renée Dallaire, Fatoumata K Tounkara, Julien Poitras, Patrick Archambault, Jean-Marc Chauny, Mathieu Ouimet, Josée Gauthier, Gilles Dupuis, Alain Tanguay, Jean-Frédéric Lévesque, Geneviève Simard-Racine, Jeannie Haggerty, France Légaré
BACKGROUND: Evidence-based indicators of quality of care have been developed to improve care and performance in Canadian emergency departments. The feasibility of measuring these indicators has been assessed mainly in urban and academic emergency departments. We sought to assess the feasibility of measuring quality-of-care indicators in rural emergency departments in Quebec. METHODS: We previously identified rural emergency departments in Quebec that offered medical coverage with hospital beds 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and were located in rural areas or small towns as defined by Statistics Canada...
July 2016: CMAJ Open
Corrie E Chumpitazi, Chris A Rees, Elizabeth A Camp, M Brooke Bernhardt
BACKGROUND: The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) changed hydrocodone-containing products (HCPs) from Schedule III to II status on October 6, 2014, making codeine-containing products (CCPs) the only non-Schedule II oral opioid agents. OBJECTIVES: We sought to describe prescribing patterns of oral opioid agents in the pediatric emergency department before and after the 2014 DEA rescheduling of HCPs. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study evaluating prescribing patterns in the pediatric emergency department at an urban, academic, quaternary care children's hospital system for 6 months before and 6 months after the DEA rescheduling of HCPs...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Beata Rybojad, Mariusz Goniewicz, Daniel Sieniawski
Pain management in emergency medical care remains underestimated, especially in pediatric patients. This is due to neglecting the issue, lack of knowledge in the appropriate use of analgesics and finally- the fear of being criticized by physicians in hospital departments. Moreover, it is difficult to objectively assess a child with acute pain. Even experienced "adult" anesthesiologists wonder how to recognize if a child suffers strong pain or is just anxious. Many different pain scales are available and some of them may be used in emergency medical care...
2016: Wiadomości Lekarskie: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
Christine Keller, Nancy E Wang, Daniel L Imler, Shreyas S Vasanawala, Matias Bruzoni, James V Quinn
BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation and cost make ultrasound (US), when available, the first imaging study for the diagnosis of suspected pediatric appendicitis. US is less sensitive and specific than computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, which are often performed after nondiagnostic US. OBJECTIVES: We sought to determine predictors of nondiagnostic US in order to guide efficient ordering of imaging studies. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of consecutive patients 4 to 30 years of age with suspected appendicitis took place at an emergency department with access to 24/7 US, MRI, and CT capabilities...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Roger Chafe, Debbie Harnum, Robert Porter
Background. The Janeway Children's Hospital previously enacted a number of measures to improve pain management for patients in its emergency department (ED). While improvements were demonstrated, rates for the timely assessment and treatment of pain remain below standards of care. Objectives. The study objectives are to investigate the impact of the previous attempts to improve the treatment of pain and to explore ways to further improve pain management in the ED. Methods. Key informant interviews and a focus group were conducted with nurses, physicians, and parents whose children were identified as having severe pain...
2016: Pain Research & Management: the Journal of the Canadian Pain Society
Zhongbo Yang, Magda Esebua, Lester Layfield
Fifteen percent to 25% of appendices resected for a preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis have no neutrophilic infiltration, thus histologically "normal." The discrepancy between clinical presentation and the lack of definite morphologic changes is confounding. It has been indicated that mast cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of the appendicitis-like pain in patients with histologically negative appendices (HNAs). To investigate whether mast cell density (MCD) is increased in pediatric HNAs, we retrieved 50 appendectomy cases (30 HNA and 20 control, ages 2 days-18 years) in our institute in the last 10 years...
October 2016: Annals of Diagnostic Pathology
Shaun Mohan, Deipanjan Nandi, Paul Stephens, Mirna MʼFarrej, R Lee Vogel, Christopher P Bonafide
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a pediatric emergency department (ED) chest pain clinical pathway on resource utilization. METHODS: Motivated by perceived overuse of cardiology consultation for non-cardiac chest pain in the ED, clinicians from the Divisions of Cardiology and Emergency Medicine collaboratively developed a chest pain clinical pathway, educated staff, and implemented the pathway on March 1, 2014. We reviewed records of children aged 3 to 18 years without prior diagnoses of heart disease who presented to the ED with chest pain between March 1, 2013, and April 22, 2015...
September 20, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Margaret A Ogden, Kristina W Rosbe, Jolie L Chang
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic sialadenitis can affect patients of all age ranges and typically presents as recurrent or chronic painful swelling of the salivary glands. In children, the most common cause of sialadenitis is juvenile recurrent parotitis. Salivary stones, or sialolithiasis, are a much less common cause. Historically, for patients with chronic sialadenitis who failed conservative management, salivary gland removal was the standard treatment option. Recently, however, sialendoscopy has emerged as an effective gland-preserving procedure for sialadenitis evaluation and treatment in adults and children...
September 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery
Daphnée Michelet, Juliette Andreu-Gallien, Alia Skhiri, Arnaud Bonnard, Yves Nivoche, Souhayl Dahmani
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Laparoscopic pediatric surgery allows a rapid postoperative rehabilitation and hospital discharge. However, the optimal postoperative pain management preserving advantages of this surgical technique remains to be determined. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the postoperative recovery of bowel function after laparoscopic surgery in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis of factors affecting recovery of bowel function in children and infants undergoing laparoscopic surgery between January 1, 2009 and September 30, 2009, was performed...
July 2016: Journal of Anaesthesiology, Clinical Pharmacology
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