Read by QxMD icon Read

Nitrate and exercise

Michaela L Sundqvist, Jon O Lundberg, Eddie Weitzberg
The nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has emerged as a significant source of nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity. Dietary intake of inorganic nitrate has a number of cardiovascular effects as well as a decrease in oxygen cost during exercise and a reduction in resting metabolic rate (RMR). Oral bacteria have a key role in bioactivation of inorganic nitrate since they catalyse the conversion of salivary nitrate to the more reactive nitrite anion. Recent studies demonstrate that blood pressure increases with the use of an antiseptic mouthwash, indicating that endogenous, NO-synthase derived nitrate is recycled into nitrite and NO, sufficiently to modulate cardiovascular function...
October 18, 2016: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
Hsing-Hua Tsai, Chin-Pu Lin, Yi-Hui Lin, Chih-Chin Hsu, Jong-Shyan Wang
PURPOSE: Exercise training improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation, whereas hypoxic stress causes vascular endothelial dysfunction. Monocyte-derived endothelial progenitor cells (Mon-EPCs) contribute to vascular repair process by differentiating into endothelial cells. This study investigates how high-intensity interval (HIT) and moderate-intensity continuous (MCT) exercise training affect circulating Mon-EPC levels and EPC functionality under hypoxic condition. METHODS: Sixty healthy sedentary males were randomized to engage in either HIT (3-min intervals at 40 and 80 % VO2max for five repetitions, n = 20) or MCT (sustained 60 % VO2max, n = 20) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks, or to a control group (CTL) that did not received exercise intervention (n = 20)...
October 19, 2016: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Joanna Majerczak, Marcin Grandys, Krzysztof Duda, Agnieszka Zakrzewska, Aneta Balcerczyk, Leszek Kolodziejski, Dorota Szymoniak-Chochol, Ryszard T Smolenski, Grzegorz Bartosz, Stefan Chlopicki, Jerzy A Zoladz
In this study we have evaluated the effect of 20-weeks of moderate-intensity endurance training (ET) on the endothelial glycocalyx layer integrity in relation to the training-induced changes in antioxidant defence. Eleven healthy young, untrained men performed an incremental cycling exercise until exhaustion before and after 20 weeks of ET. Endurance training consisted of 40- minute sessions, mainly of moderate-intensity (∼50% of VO2max ), performed 4 times per week. Venous blood samples were taken at rest and at the end of the maximal exercise test...
October 17, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Joseph A McQuillan, Deborah K Dulson, Paul B Laursen, Andrew E Kilding
PURPOSE: To determine the effect of dietary nitrate (NO3(-)) supplementation on physiology and performance in well-trained cyclists following six to eight-days of NO3(-) supplementation. METHODS: Eight competitive male cyclists (mean ± SD; age = 26 ± 8 y; body mass = 76.7 ± 6.9 kg; VO2peak = 63 ± 4 participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover-design study in which participants ingested 70 ml beetroot juice containing ~4 mmol NO3(-) (NIT) or a NO3(-) depleted placebo (PLA), each for 8-days...
October 13, 2016: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Sinead T J McDonagh, Anni Vanhatalo, Jonathan Fulford, Lee J Wylie, Stephen J Bailey, Andrew M Jones
We tested the hypothesis that dietary nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) supplementation could partially offset deteriorations in O(2) transport and utilization, and exercise tolerance, after blood donation. Twenty-two healthy volunteers performed moderate-intensity and ramp incremental cycle exercise tests prior to and following the withdrawal of ~450 mL of whole blood. Before donation, all subjects consumed 7 x 70 mL of nitrate-depleted beetroot juice shots (PL) in the 48 h preceding the exercise tests. During the 48 h after blood donation, subjects consumed 7 shots of either BR (each containing 6...
September 30, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Bryan Heath Curry, Vernon Bond, Sudhakar Pemminati, Vasavi Rakesh Gorantla, Yulia Andreevna Volkova, Kishan Kadur, Richard Mark Millis
INTRODUCTION: Beetroot Juice (BJ) contains dietary nitrates that increase the blood Nitric Oxide (NO) level, decrease Blood Pressure (BP), increase athletic performance and improve cognitive functions but the mechanism remains unclear. Ultrasonographic measurement of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with computation of Cerebral Augmentation Index (CAIx) is a measure of the reflected flow signal, modulated by changes in cerebrovascular resistance and compliance. AIM: This pilot study tests the hypothesis that ingestion of an amount of BJ sufficient to raise the blood NO level two-to three-fold, decreases Transcranial Doppler (TCD) measured CAIx...
July 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
Jean Nyakayiru, Kristin L Jonvik, Philippe J M Pinckaers, Joan Senden, Luc J C Van Loon, Lex B Verdijk
While the majority of studies reporting ergogenic effects of dietary nitrate have used a multiday supplementation protocol, some studies suggest that a single dose of dietary nitrate prior to exercise can also improve subsequent performance. We aimed to compare the impact of acute and 6-day sodium nitrate supplementation on oxygen uptake (V̇O2) and time-trial performance in trained cyclists. Using a randomized, double blind, cross-over design, 17 male cyclists (25±4 y, V̇O2peak 65±4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), Wmax 411±35 W) were subjected to 3 different trials; 5 days placebo and 1 day sodium nitrate supplementation (1-DAY); 6 days sodium nitrate supplementation (6-DAY); 6 days placebo supplementation (PLA)...
September 6, 2016: International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Nicholas F McMahon, Michael D Leveritt, Toby G Pavey
BACKGROUND: Recent research into the use of dietary nitrates and their role in vascular function has led to it becoming progressively more popular amongst athletes attempting to enhance performance. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to evaluate the effect of dietary nitrate (NO3 (-)) supplementation on endurance exercise performance. An additional aim was to determine whether the performance outcomes are affected by potential moderator variables...
September 6, 2016: Sports Medicine
Philip J Hennis, Kay Mitchell, Edward Gilbert-Kawai, Vassiliki Bountziouka, Angie Wade, Martin Feelisch, Michael P Grocott, Daniel S Martin
: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary nitrate supplementation, in the form of beetroot juice, on acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms and physiological responses, in a group of young males trekking to Mount Everest Base Camp (EBC). Forty healthy male students (mean age (SD): 16 (1) yrs) trekked to EBC over 11 days. Following an overnight fast, each morning participants completed the Lake Louise AMS questionnaire and underwent a series of physiological tests: resting blood pressure as well as resting and exercising heart rate, respiratory rate, and peripheral oxygen saturation...
September 2, 2016: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
Simone Porcelli, Lorenzo Pugliese, Enrico Rejc, Gaspare Pavei, Matteo Bonato, Michela Montorsi, Antonio La Torre, Letizia Rasica, Mauro Marzorati
It has been reported that nitrate supplementation can improve exercise performance. Most of the studies have used either beetroot juice or sodium nitrate as a supplement; there is lack of data on the potential ergogenic benefits of an increased dietary nitrate intake from a diet based on fruits and vegetables. Our aim was to assess whether a high-nitrate diet increases nitric oxide bioavailability and to evaluate the effects of this nutritional intervention on exercise performance. Seven healthy male subjects participated in a randomized cross-over study...
2016: Nutrients
Jason David Allen, Mary N Woessner, Mitch VanBruggen, Thomas Stabler, Johanna L Johnson, Carl Pieper, William E Kraus
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Cassandra Smith, Mary N Woessner, Mitch VanBruggen, Thomas Stabler, Johanna L Johnson, Carl Pieper, William E Kraus, Jason D Allen
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
David M Fothergill, Allison R Loiselle, Anthony R Reinhold
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
R Andrew Shanely, David C Nieman, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Dru A Henson, Mary P Meaney, Amy M Knab, Lynn Cialdell-Kam
Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM) contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years) participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study...
2016: Nutrients
Oliver Michael Shannon, Lauren Duckworth, Matthew John Barlow, David Woods, Jose Lara, Mario Siervo, John Paul O'Hara
Nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BRJ) increases plasma nitrite concentrations, lowers the oxygen cost (V⋅O2) of steady-state exercise and improves exercise performance in sedentary and moderately-trained, but rarely in well-trained individuals exercising at sea-level. BRJ supplementation may be more effective in a hypoxic environment, where the reduction of nitrite into nitric oxide (NO) is potentiated, such that well-trained and less well-trained individuals may derive a similar ergogenic effect. We conducted a randomised, counterbalanced, double-blind placebo controlled trial to determine the effects of BRJ on treadmill running performance in moderate normobaric hypoxia (equivalent to 2500 m altitude) in participants with a range of aerobic fitness levels...
September 30, 2016: Nitric Oxide: Biology and Chemistry
Nimai Senapati, Abad Chabbi, André Faé Giostri, Jagadeesh B Yeluripati, Pete Smith
The DailyDayCent biogeochemical model was used to simulate nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from two contrasting agro-ecosystems viz. a mown-grassland and a grain-cropping system in France. Model performance was tested using high frequency measurements over three years; additionally a local sensitivity analysis was performed. Annual N2O emissions of 1.97 and 1.24kgNha(-1)year(-1) were simulated from mown-grassland and grain-cropland, respectively. Measured and simulated water filled pore space (r=0.86, ME=-2.5%) and soil temperature (r=0...
August 18, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
Kanji Matsukawa, Kei Ishii, Ryota Asahara, Mitsuhiro Idesako
Our laboratory has reported that central command blunts the sensitivity of aortic baroreceptor-heart rate (HR) reflex at the onset of voluntary static exercise in animals. We have examined whether baroreflex control of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) and/or cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity are altered at the onset of spontaneously occurring motor behavior, which was monitored with tibial nerve activity in paralyzed, decerebrate cats. CSNA exhibited a peak increase (126 ± 17%) immediately after the exercise onset, followed by increases in HR and mean arterial pressure (MAP)...
August 18, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
Scott K Ferguson, Clark T Holdsworth, Trenton D Colburn, Jennifer L Wright, Jesse C Craig, Alex Fees, Andrew M Jones, Jason D Allen, Timothy I Musch, David C Poole
Chronic heart failure (CHF) results in central and peripheral derangements that ultimately reduce skeletal muscle O2 delivery and impair exercise tolerance. Dietary nitrate (NO3 (-)) supplementation improves skeletal muscle vascular function and tolerance to exercise. We tested the hypothesis that NO3 (-) supplementation would elevate exercising skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance (VC) in CHF rats. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced (coronary artery ligation) in young adult male rats...
September 1, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
Giuseppe M C Rosano, Cristiana Vitale, Maurizio Volterrani
Percutaneous coronary intervention and anti-anginal medications have similar prognostic effectiveness in patients with chronic stable angina. The choice of optimal medical therapy for the management of chronic angina is of pivotal importance in patients with stable ischemic heart disease. The most commonly used anti-anginal agents have demonstrated equivalent efficacy in improving patient reported ischemic symptoms and quantitative exercise parameters. With regards to mortality, beta-blockers are beneficial only in the setting of depressed left ventricular systolic function after a recent myocardial infarction...
August 2016: Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy
Ilarraza-Lomelí Hermes, García-Saldivia Marianna, Rojano-Castillo Jessica, Barrera-Ramírez Carlos, Chávez-Domínguez Rafael, Rius-Suárez María Dolores, Iturralde Pedro
BACKGROUND: Mortality due to cardiovascular disease is often associated with ventricular arrhythmias. Nowadays, patients with cardiovascular disease are more encouraged to take part in physical training programs. Nevertheless, high-intensity exercise is associated to a higher risk for sudden death, even in apparently healthy people. During an exercise testing (ET), health care professionals provide patients, in a controlled scenario, an intense physiological stimulus that could precipitate cardiac arrhythmia in high risk individuals...
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"