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Acute kidney injury on chronic kidney disease

Keigo Tsushida, Katsuyuki Tanabe, Kana Masuda, Satoshi Tanimura, Hiromasa Miyake, Yuka Arata, Hitoshi Sugiyama, Jun Wada
Acute kidney injury (AKI) has been associated with not only higher in-hospital mortality but also the subsequent development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent evidence has suggested the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired dynamics in the pathogenesis of AKI. Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) is an orphan nuclear receptor that acts as a transcription factor to regulate the transcription of genes required for mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. In the present study, we examined the effects of ERRα deficiency on the progression of AKI induced by cisplatin...
March 12, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Meda E Pavkov, Jessica L Harding, Nilka R Burrows
Acute kidney injury is a sudden decrease in kidney function with or without kidney damage, occurring over a few hours or days. Diabetes, hypertension, and advanced age are primary risk factors for acute kidney injury. It is increasingly recognized as an in-hospital complication of sepsis, heart conditions, and surgery (1,2). Its most severe stage requires treatment with dialysis. Acute kidney injury is also associated with higher likelihood of long-term care, incidence of chronic kidney disease and hospital mortality, and health care costs (1,2)...
March 16, 2018: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Miguel Fontecha-Barriuso, Diego Martin-Sanchez, Olga Ruiz-Andres, Jonay Poveda, Maria Dolores Sanchez-Niño, Lara Valiño-Rivas, Marta Ruiz-Ortega, Alberto Ortiz, Ana Belén Sanz
Epigenetics refers to heritable changes in gene expression patterns not caused by an altered nucleotide sequence, and includes non-coding RNAs and covalent modifications of DNA and histones. This review focuses on functional evidence for the involvement of DNA and histone epigenetic modifications in the pathogenesis of kidney disease and the potential therapeutic implications. There is evidence of activation of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in acute kidney injury (AKI), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the AKI-to-CKD transition of diverse aetiologies, including ischaemia-reperfusion injury, nephrotoxicity, ureteral obstruction, diabetes, glomerulonephritis and polycystic kidney disease...
March 9, 2018: Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation
Subir Bhatia, Shilpkumar Arora, Sravya M Bhatia, Mohammed Al-Hijji, Yogesh N V Reddy, Parshva Patel, Charanjit S Rihal, Bernard J Gersh, Abhishek Deshmukh
BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. CKD complicates referral for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients because of the risk for acute kidney injury and the need for dialysis, with American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines underscoring the limited data on these patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using the National Inpatient Sample to analyze hospitalizations in the United States from 2004 to 2014, we sought to assess PCI utilization and in-hospital outcomes in NSTEMI admissions with CKD...
March 10, 2018: Journal of the American Heart Association
Vincent Johan Nijenhuis, Joyce Peper, Veronique M M Vorselaars, Martin J Swaans, Thom De Kroon, Jan A S Van der Heyden, Benno J W M Rensing, Robin Heijmen, Willem-Jan W Bos, Jurrien M Ten Berg
Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is associated with acute kidney injury (AKI), but can also improve the kidney function (IKF). We assessed the effects of kidney function changes in relation to baseline kidney function on 2-year clinical outcomes after TAVI. In total, 639 consecutive patients with aortic stenosis who underwent TAVI were stratified into 3 groups according to the ratio of serum creatinine post- to pre-TAVI: IKF (≤0.80; n = 95 [15%]), stable kidney function (0.80 to 1.5; n = 477 [75%]), and AKI (≥1...
February 12, 2018: American Journal of Cardiology
K Johanna R Hoyer, Sebastian Dittrich, Malte P Bartram, Markus M Rinschen
Renal diseases are driven by alterations in the entity of proteins within the kidney, at the level of single cells, nephron subunits (such as glomerulus and tubule), tissues and body fluids. Histologically, kidney diseases are extremely heterogeneous. Mass-spectrometry based proteomics provides a unique opportunity to interrogate heterogeneity and dynamics of various proteome layers within the kidney to better understand physiology and pathophysiology, and to translate signaling networks into therapies. Yet, the success of this endeavor will largely depend on improving proteomic data acquisition methods toward increased reproducibility...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Proteomics
Brendan Bowman, Sijie Zheng, Alex Yang, Brigitte Schiller, José A Morfín, Melvin Seek, Robert S Lockridge
Dialysis care in the United States continues to move toward an emphasis on continuous quality improvement and performance benchmarking. Government- and industry-sponsored programs have evolved to assess and incentivize outcomes for many components of end-stage renal disease care. One aspect that remains largely unaddressed at a systemic level is the high-risk transition period from chronic kidney disease and acute kidney injury to permanent dialysis dependence. Incident dialysis patients experience disproportionately high mortality and hospitalization rates coupled with high costs...
March 3, 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Petter Bjornstad, David M Maahs, Carlos A Roncal, Janet K Snell-Bergeon, Viral N Shah, Tamara Harra, Samuel L Ellis, Matthew Hatch, Linh T Chung, Marian J Rewers, Satish Garg, David Z Cherney, Laura Pyle, Kristen J Nadeau, Richard J Johnson
Uricosuria and crystallization are increasingly recognized risk factors for diabetic tubulopathy. This pilot clinical trial aimed to determine the acute effect of urinary alkalinization using oral sodium bicarbonate [NaHCO3 ] on UA crystals in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Adults with T1D ages 18-65 years (n=45, 60% female, HbA1c 7.5±1.2%, 20.2±9.3 years duration) without chronic kidney disease (eGFR ≥60ml/min/1.73m2 and albumin-to-creatinine ratio <30mg/g) received two doses of 1950 mg oral NaHCO3 over 24 hours...
March 2, 2018: Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism
Akash Deep, Romit Saxena, Bipin Jose
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common accompaniment in patients with liver disease. The causes, risk factors, manifestations and management of AKI in these patients vary according to the liver disease in question (acute liver failure, acute-on-chronic liver failure, post-liver transplantation or metabolic liver disease). There are multiple causes of AKI in patients with liver disease-pre-renal, acute tubular necrosis, post-renal, drug-induced renal failure and hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Definitions of AKI in liver failure are periodically revised and updated, but pediatric definitions have still to see the light of the day...
March 1, 2018: Pediatric Nephrology: Journal of the International Pediatric Nephrology Association
Richard J Johnson, George L Bakris, Claudio Borghi, Michel B Chonchol, David Feldman, Miguel A Lanaspa, Tony R Merriman, Orson W Moe, David B Mount, Laura Gabriella Sanchez Lozada, Eli Stahl, Daniel E Weiner, Glenn M Chertow
Urate is a cause of gout, kidney stones, and acute kidney injury from tumor lysis syndrome, but its relationship to kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes remains controversial. A scientific workshop organized by the National Kidney Foundation was held in September 2016 to review current evidence. Cell culture studies and animal models suggest that elevated serum urate concentrations can contribute to kidney disease, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome. Epidemiologic evidence also supports elevated serum urate concentrations as a risk factor for the development of kidney disease, hypertension, and diabetes, but differences in methodologies and inpacts on serum urate concentrations by even subtle changes in kidney function render conclusions uncertain...
February 26, 2018: American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
Chia-Ter Chao, Jui Wang, Hon-Yen Wu, Jenq-Wen Huang, Kuo-Liong Chien
The incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) rises with age and is associated with multiple risk factors. Here, we compared the risk factors for AKI between younger and older incident diabetic patients to examine the trends in risk alteration for individual factors across different age groups. Between 2007 and 2013, we selected all incident type 2 diabetic adults from the Taiwan National Health Insurance registry, stratified based on age: young (< 65 years), old (≥ 65 but < 75 years), and older-old (≥ 75 years)...
February 27, 2018: GeroScience
Styliani I Kokoris, Eleni Gavriilaki, Aggeliki Miari, Αnthi Travlou, Elias Kyriakou, Achilles Anagnostopoulos, Elissavet Grouzi
OBJECTIVES: The present review summarizes the available knowledge regarding acute and chronic kidney dysfunction in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) focusing on its clinical features, pathophysiology and treatment. METHODS: A thorough PubMed search was performed using as main keywords: 'paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria', 'acute kidney injury', 'chronic kidney disease' and 'eculizumab'. RESULTS: PNH's etiopathogenesis is based on acquired mutations that lead to the reduction or absence of CD55 and CD59 complement regulators, which are responsible for some of the disease's major clinical features, like intravascular hemolysis, cytopenias and thrombosis...
February 28, 2018: Hematology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
Maliha A Alikhan, Megan Huynh, A Richard Kitching, Joshua D Ooi
The kidney is vulnerable to injury, both acute and chronic from a variety of immune and metabolic insults, all of which at least to some degree involve inflammation. Regulatory T cells modulate systemic autoimmune and allogenic responses in glomerulonephritis and transplantation. Intrarenal regulatory T cells (Tregs), including those recruited to the kidney, have suppressive effects on both adaptive and innate immune cells, and probably also intrinsic kidney cells. Evidence from autoimmune glomerulonephritis implicates antigen-specific Tregs in HLA-mediated dominant protection, while in several human renal diseases Tregs are abnormal in number or phenotype...
2018: Clinical & Translational Immunology
Masamitsu Ubukata, Masaki Hara, Yuki Nishizawa, Teruhiro Fujii, Kosaku Nitta, Akihito Ohta
In patients with lymphoma, an important issue that has been recognized is renal involvement, including glomerulonephritis, acute kidney injury, and lymphoma infiltrating the kidney. However, the prevalence and mortality of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have not been fully understood in lymphoma patients. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of CKD and its impact on mortality in those patients.This was a retrospective cohort study of 429 consecutive lymphoma patients who were admitted or regularly visited our hospital from January 2013 to October 2016...
January 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Osamu Ichii, Taro Horino
Mature microRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded RNAs with approximately 18-25 bases, and their sequences are highly conserved among animals. miRNAs act as posttranscriptional regulators by binding mRNAs, and their main function involves the degradation of their target mRNAs. Recent studies revealed altered expression of miRNAs in the kidneys during the progression of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans and experimental rodent models by using high-throughput screening techniques including microarray and small RNA sequencing...
January 2018: Journal of Toxicologic Pathology
Marta Christov, Abbe R Clark, Braden Corbin, Samy Hakroush, Eugene P Rhee, Hiroaki Saito, Dan Brooks, Eric Hesse, Mary Bouxsein, Niels Galjart, Ji Yong Jung, Peter Mundel, Harald Jüppner, Astrid Weins, Anna Greka
Progressive chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) are on the rise worldwide. However, the sequence of events resulting in CKD progression remain poorly understood. Animal models of CKD exploring these issues are confounded by systemic toxicities or surgical interventions to acutely induce kidney injury. Here we report the generation of a CKD mouse model through the inducible podocyte-specific ablation of an essential endogenous molecule, the chromatin structure regulator CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF), which leads to rapid podocyte loss (iCTCFpod-/-)...
February 22, 2018: JCI Insight
Derek M Culnan, Kelley Farner, Genevieve H Bitz, Karel D Capek, Yiji Tu, Carlos Jimenez, William C Lineaweaver
Volume resuscitation of patients with high-voltage electrical injuries (>1000 V) is a more complex challenge than standard burn resuscitation. High voltages penetrate deep tissues. These deep injuries are not accounted for in resuscitation formulae dependent on percentage of cutaneous burn. Myonecrosis occurring from direct electrical injury and secondary compartment syndromes can result in rhabdomyolysis, compromising renal function and urine output. Urine output is the primary end point, with a goal of 1 mL/kg/h for adult patients with high-voltage electrical injuries...
March 2018: Annals of Plastic Surgery
Balázs Szirmay, Péter Kustán, Zoltán Horváth-Szalai, Andrea Ludány, Ágnes Lakatos, Diána Mühl, István Wittmann, Attila Miseta, Gábor L Kovács, Tamás Kőszegi
AIM: There is no commercially available urinary cystatin-C (u-CYSC) test in the market. Therefore, we optimized and validated an automated immune turbidimetric test for u-CYSC measurements and investigated u-CYSC concentrations in acute and chronic diseases which might lead to renal tubular disorders. MATERIALS & METHODS: A particle-enhanced immune turbidimetric assay was adapted and validated on a Cobas 8000/c502 analyzer. Urine samples of different patient groups were also analyzed...
February 16, 2018: Bioanalysis
Maroun Sfeir, Marissa Walsh, Rossana Rosa, Laura Aragon, Sze Yan Liu, Timothy Cleary, Marylee Worley, Corey Frederick, Lilian M Abbo
Background: Infections caused by Mycobacterium abscessus group strains are usually resistant to multiple antimicrobials and challenging to treat worldwide. We describe the risk factors, treatment, and clinical outcomes of patients in 2 large academic medical centers in the United States. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of hospitalized adults with a positive culture for M. abscessus in Miami, Florida (January 1, 2011, to December 31, 2014). Demographics, comorbidities, the source of infection, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and clinical outcomes were analyzed...
February 2018: Open Forum Infectious Diseases
Andrea L Conroy, Michael T Hawkes, Robyn Elphinstone, Robert O Opoka, Sophie Namasopo, Christopher Miller, Chandy C John, Kevin C Kain
BACKGROUND: Chitinase-3-like 1 (CHI3L1) is a glycoprotein elevated in paediatric severe malaria, and an emerging urinary biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI). Based on the hypothesis that elevated CHI3L1 levels in malaria are associated with disease severity, the relationship between plasma CHI3L1 levels, AKI and mortality was investigated in Ugandan children enrolled in a clinical trial evaluating inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) as an adjunctive therapy for severe malaria. METHODS: Plasma CHI3L1 levels were measured daily for 4 days in children admitted to hospital with severe malaria and at day 14 follow up...
February 15, 2018: Malaria Journal
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