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Esophageal myotomy

N Nakajima, H Sato, K Takahashi, G Hasegawa, K Mizuno, S Hashimoto, Y Sato, S Terai
BACKGROUND: Histopathology of muscularis externa in primary esophageal motility disorders has been characterized previously. We aimed to correlate the results of high-resolution manometry with those of histopathology. METHODS: During peroral endoscopic myotomy, peroral esophageal muscle biopsy was performed in patients with primary esophageal motility disorders. Immunohistochemical staining for c-kit was performed to assess the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs)...
October 3, 2016: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
Helle Ø Kristensen, Jakob Kirkegård, Daniel Willy Kjær, Frank Viborg Mortensen, Rastislav Kunda, Niels Christian Bjerregaard
BACKGROUND: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging procedure in the treatment of esophageal achalasia, a primary motility disorder. However, the long-term outcome of POEM in patients, who have previously undergone a Heller myotomy, is unknown. METHODS: Using a local database, we identified patients with esophageal achalasia, who underwent POEM. We compared patients with a previous Heller myotomy to those, who had received none or only non-surgical therapy prior to the POEM procedure...
October 3, 2016: Surgical Endoscopy
Tsung-Shih Li, Tsung-Yang Lee, Kate Hsiurong Liao
More and more endoscopically gastrointestinal procedures require anesthesiologists to perform general anesthesia, such as "peroral endoscopic myotomy". Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a novel invasive treatment for the primary motility disorder of esophagus, called esophageal achalasia. Despite of its minimally invasive feature, there are still complications during the procedure which develop to critical conditions and threat patients' lives. Herein we describe a case about tension pneumothorax subsequent to esophageal rupture during peroral endoscopic myotomy...
September 27, 2016: Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia
An Moonen, Guy Boeckxstaens
Achalasia is a primary esophageal motor disorder of the esophagus that is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis and a failure of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) to relax upon swallowing. The defective relaxation leads to symptoms of dysphagia for solids and liquids, regurgitation, aspiration, chest pain, and weight loss. Achalasia is believed to result from a selective loss of enteric inhibitory neurons, most likely due to an autoimmune phenomenon in genetic susceptible individuals. As there is no curative treatment for achalasia, treatment is confined to disruption of the LES to improve bolus passage...
September 29, 2016: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology
Saowanee Ngamruengphong, Haruhiro Inoue, Philip Chiu, Hon-Chi Yip, Amol Bapaye, Michael Ujiki, Lava Patel, Pankaj N Desai, Bu Hayee, Amyn Haji, Vivien Wong, Silvana Perretta, Shivangi Dorwat, Mathieu Pioche, Sabine Roman, Jérôme Rivory, François Mion, Thierry Ponchon, Aurélien Garros, Jun Nakamura, Yoshitaka Hata, Valerio Balassone, Manabu Onimaru, Gulara Hajiyeva, Amr Ismail, Yen-I Chen, Majidah Bukhari, Yamile Haito-Chavez, Vivek Kumbhari, Roberta Maselli, Alessandro Repici, Mouen A Khashab
BACKGROUND: Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has shown promising safety and efficacy in short-term studies. However, long term follow-up data is very limited. The aims of this study were to assess (1) clinical outcome of patients with a minimum post-POEM follow-up of 2 years and (2) factors associated with long term clinical failure after POEM. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed that included all consecutive patients with achalasia who underwent POEM with a minimum follow-up of 2 years at 10 tertiary-care centers...
September 20, 2016: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Oscar M Crespin, Louis W C Liu, Ambica Parmar, Timothy D Jackson, Jemila Hamid, Eran Shlomovitz, Allan Okrainec
INTRODUCTION: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a novel intervention for the treatment of achalasia, which combines the advantages of endoscopic access and myotomy. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to evaluate the efficacy and safety of POEM. METHODS: The systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid MEDLINE (R) including in-process and non-indexed citations were searched for POEM studies using the keywords: esophageal achalasia, POEM, endoscopy, natural orifice surgery, laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), and related terms...
September 15, 2016: Surgical Endoscopy
Madhusudhan R Sanaka, Ramprasad Jegadeesan, Prashanthi N Thota, Udayakumar Navaneethan, Rocio Lopez, Sudish C Murthy, Siva Raja
Background and Aims. We initiated peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) utilizing a two-person technique with combination of an advanced endoscopist and a thoracic surgeon with complementary skills. Our aim was to determine the feasibility and outcomes in initial 20 patients. Methods. In this observational study, main outcomes measured were therapeutic success in relieving symptoms (Eckardt score < 3), decrease in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures, improvement in emptying on timed barium esophagogram (TBE), and complications...
2016: Canadian Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Nithin Jayan, Jaya Susan Jacob, Mohan Mathew, Roy Joy Mukkada
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a safe and minimally invasive modality regarded as the first-line management of all types of achalasia. POEM is performed under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation using an orally inserted flexible fiberscope. The aim of this study is to describe the anesthetic management of POEM for achalasia. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A chart review of 21 patients who underwent POEM for achalasia at our center from March 2013 to June 2015 was performed...
July 2016: Journal of Anaesthesiology, Clinical Pharmacology
Stavros N Stavropoulos, David Friedel, Rani Modayil, Henry P Parkman
Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification...
September 13, 2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Caitlin C Chrystoja, Gail E Darling, Nicholas E Diamant, Paul P Kortan, George A Tomlinson, Wayne Deitel, Audrey Laporte, Julie Takata, David R Urbach
OBJECTIVES: Achalasia is a chronic, progressive, and incurable esophageal motility disease. There is clinical uncertainty about which treatment should be recommended as first-line therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of pneumatic dilation compared with laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication in improving achalasia-specific quality of life. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized trial at five academic hospitals in Canada...
September 13, 2016: American Journal of Gastroenterology
Emmanuel Akintoye, Nitin Kumar, Itegbemie Obaitan, Quazim A Alayo, Christopher C Thompson
Background and study aim: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a relatively novel minimally invasive technique that is used to treat achalasia and other esophageal motility disorders. We systematically reviewed the medical literature in order to evaluate the safety and efficacy of POEM. Methods: We performed a comprehensive review and meta-analysis of studies published up to March 2016 that reported on clinical outcomes of POEM. Five databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Ovid, CINAHL, and Cochrane. Results: A total of 36 studies involving 2373 patients were included in the review...
September 12, 2016: Endoscopy
Yuki B Werner, Daniel von Renteln, Tania Noder, Guido Schachschal, Ulrike W Denzer, Stefan Groth, Jan F Nast, Jan F Kersten, Martin Petzoldt, Gerhard Adam, Oliver Mann, Alessandro Repici, Cesare Hassan, Thomas Rösch
BACKGROUND & AIMS: The recently developed technique of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been shown to be effective for the therapy of esophageal motility disorders. Limited information is available about POEM adverse events (AE). METHODS: POEM was performed with the patients under general anesthesia in 241 patients (58% male, mean age 47.4 ± 16.4 years) during 61 months. Main outcome was the rate of intra- and post-procedural adverse events (AE). Post-procedural checks comprised clinical and laboratory examination, and endoscopy, with further follow-ups being performed at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively...
September 5, 2016: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Ciro Andolfi, P Marco Fisichella
Surgical correction of achalasia using laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication is argued to be the gold standard treatment for patients with achalasia. The goal of this technical report is to illustrate our preferred approach to patients with achalasia and to provide the reader with a detailed description of our operative technique, its rationale, and our pre and postoperative management.
September 8, 2016: Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
Michael F Vaezi, Valter N Felix, Roberto Penagini, Aurelio Mauro, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux de Moura, Leonardo Zorrón Cheng Tao Pu, Jan Martinek, Erwin Rieder
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder associated with abnormalities in peristalsis and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation. The etiology of the disease remains elusive. It is often misdiagnosed initially as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients with achalasia often complain of dysphagia to solids and liquids but may focus on regurgitation as the primary symptom, leading to the early misdiagnosis. Chest pain, weight loss, and occasional vomiting may be additional symptoms encountered in those with achalasia...
August 29, 2016: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Stavros N Stavropoulos, Rani Modayil, David Friedel
Per-oral endoscopic myotomy has emerged as the preferred option for treatment of achalasia. This entirely endoscopic procedure has clinical efficacy and lower esophageal sphincter disruption comparable to laparoscopic Heller myotomy with lesser postprocedure pain and length of stay. This review describes per-oral endoscopic myotomy technique, evolution, patient selection, comparison to other therapies, training, and future considerations, including extrapolation of tunnel endoscopy to other situations.
2016: Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Brian E Louie, Andreas M Schneider, Drew B Schembre, Ralph W Aye
BACKGROUND: Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is performed by accessing the submucosal space of the esophagus. This space may be impacted by prior interventions such as submucosal injections, dilations or previous myotomies. These interventions could make POEM more difficult and may deter surgeons during their initial experience. We sought to determine the impact of prior interventions on our early experience. METHODS: Prospective, single-center study of consecutive patients undergoing POEM...
August 23, 2016: Surgical Endoscopy
Andreas M Schneider, Brian E Louie, Heather F Warren, Alexander S Farivar, Drew B Schembre, Ralph W Aye
BACKGROUND: Per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is increasingly utilized to treat patients with achalasia. Early results have demonstrated significant improvement of symptoms, but there are concerns about postoperative reflux. With only limited comparative data available, we sought to compare POEM to laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) with partial fundoplication. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of 42 POEM and 84 LHM patients undergoing primary myotomy for achalasia...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery: Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
Eric S Hungness, Joel M Sternbach, Ezra N Teitelbaum, Peter J Kahrilas, John E Pandolfino, Nathaniel J Soper
OBJECTIVE: We aimed to report long-term outcomes for patients undergoing per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) after our initial 15-case learning curve. BACKGROUND: POEM has become an established, natural-orifice surgical approach for treating esophageal motility disorders. To date, published outcomes and comparative-effectiveness studies have included patients from the early POEM experience. METHODS: Consecutive patients undergoing POEM after our initial 15 cases, with a minimum of 1-year postoperative follow-up, were included...
September 2016: Annals of Surgery
Yoshihito Souma, Kiyokazu Nakajima, Eiji Taniguchi, Tsuyoshi Takahashi, Yukinori Kurokawa, Makoto Yamasaki, Yasuhiro Miyazaki, Tomoki Makino, Tetsuhiro Hamada, Jun Yasuda, Takeyoshi Yumiba, Shuichi Ohashi, Shuji Takiguchi, Masaki Mori, Yuichiro Doki
BACKGROUND: Controversy remains whether preoperative pneumatic balloon dilation (PBD) influences the surgical outcome of laparoscopic esophagocardiomyotomy in patients with esophageal achalasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether preoperative PBD represents a risk factor for surgical complications and affects the symptomatic and/or functional outcomes of laparoscopic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication (LHD). METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted on a prospectively compiled surgical database of 103 consecutive patients with esophageal achalasia who underwent LHD from November 1994 to September 2014...
August 8, 2016: Surgical Endoscopy
Majidah Bukhari, Vivek Kumbhari, Yamile Haito-Chavez, Yen-I Chen, Saowanee Ngamruengphong, Payal Saxena, Mouen A Khashab
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Endoscopy
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