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Emergency Medicine Resident

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435509/usmle-scores-predict-success-in-abem-initial-certification-a-multicenter-study
#1
Elie Harmouche, Nikhil Goyal, Ashley Pinawin, Jumana Nagarwala, Rahul Bhat
INTRODUCTION: There are no existing data on whether performance on the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) predicts success in American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) certification. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of any association between USMLE scores and first-time success on the ABEM qualifying and oral certification examinations. METHODS: We retrospectively collected USMLE Step 1, Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) scores and pass/fail results from the first attempt at ABEM qualifying and oral examinations from residents graduating between 2009 and 2011 from nine EM programs...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435508/a-novel-collaboration-to-reduce-the-travel-related-cost-of-residency-interviewing
#2
Eric Shappell, Abra Fant, Benjamin Schnapp, Jill P Craig, James Ahn, Christine Babcock, Michael A Gisondi
INTRODUCTION: Interviewing for residency is a complicated and often expensive endeavor. Literature has estimated interview costs of $4,000 to $15,000 per applicant, mostly attributable to travel and lodging. The authors sought to reduce these costs and improve the applicant interview experience by coordinating interview dates between two residency programs in Chicago, Illinois. METHODS: Two emergency medicine residency programs scheduled contiguous interview dates for the 2015-2016 interview season...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435507/blog-and-podcast-watch-orthopedic-emergencies
#3
Andrew Grock, Salim Rezaie, Anand Swaminathan, Alice Min, Kaushal H Shah, Michelle Lin
INTRODUCTION: The WestJEM Blog and Podcast Watch presents high quality open-access educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) based on the ongoing ALiEM Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) and AIR-Professional series. Both series critically appraise resources using an objective scoring rubric. This installment of the Blog and Podcast Watch highlights the topic of orthopedic emergencies from the AIR series. METHODS: The AIR series is a continuously building curriculum that follows the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) annual testing schedule...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435506/audience-response-system-facilitates-prediction-of-scores-on-in-training-examination
#4
Kaushal H Shah, Jaime Jordan, Katherine Jahnes, David P Lisbon, Lucienne Lutfy-Clayton, Grant Wei, Gary Winkel, Sally A Santen
INTRODUCTION: Audience response systems (ARS) are increasingly popular; however, their contribution to education is not completely clear. Our study found that scores from review quizzes delivered by an ARS correlate with in-training exam (ITE) scores and are viewed positively by residents. This information may be useful in identifying poor performers early so that targeted educational interventions can be made. The objective was to determine if scores on review quizzes delivered by an ARS correlate with ITE scores and to obtain participant feedback on use of the ARS for ITE preparation...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28435505/inter-rater-agreement-of-end-of-shift-evaluations-based-on-a-single-encounter
#5
Steven Warrington, Michael Beeson, Amber Bradford
INTRODUCTION: End-of-shift evaluation (ESE) forms, also known as daily encounter cards, represent a subset of encounter-based assessment forms. Encounter cards have become prevalent for formative evaluation, with some suggesting a potential for summative evaluation. Our objective was to evaluate the inter-rater agreement of ESE forms using a single scripted encounter at a conference of emergency medicine (EM) educators. METHODS: Following institutional review board exemption, we created a scripted video simulating an encounter between an intern and a patient with an ankle injury...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28433453/attending-documentation-contribution-to-billing-at-an-academic-emergency-department-with-an-electronic-health-record
#6
Brian J Yun, Stephen C Dorner, Brian M Baccari, John Brennan, Karen Smith, Ali S Raja, Benjamin A White
INTRODUCTION: In emergency medicine (EM), patient care documentation serves many functions, including supporting reimbursement. In addition, many electronic health record systems facilitate automatically populating certain data fields. As a result, in the academic model, the attending's note may now more often recapitulate many of the same elements found in the resident's or physician assistant's (PA) note. We sought to determine the value of additional attending documentation, and how often the attending documentation prevented a downcoding event...
April 14, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431426/anesthesiologists-and-disaster-medicine-a-needs-assessment-for-education-and-training-and-reported-willingness-to-respond
#7
Heather K Hayanga, Daniel J Barnett, Natasha R Shallow, Michael Roberts, Carol B Thompson, Itay Bentov, Gozde Demiralp, Bradford D Winters, Deborah A Schwengel
BACKGROUND: Anesthesiologists provide comprehensive health care across the emergency department, operating room, and intensive care unit. To date, anesthesiologists' perspectives regarding disaster medicine and public health preparedness have not been described. METHODS: Anesthesiologists' thoughts and attitudes were assessed via a Web-based survey at 3 major academic institutions. Frequencies, percentages, and odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess self-reported perceptions of knowledge and skills, as well as attitudes and beliefs regarding education and training, employee development, professional obligation, safety, psychological readiness, efficacy, personal preparedness, and willingness to respond (WTR)...
May 2017: Anesthesia and Analgesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425004/on-the-inner-life-of-physicians-analysis-of-family-medicine-residents-written-reflections
#8
Andrea Vicini, Allen F Shaughnessy, Ashley Duggan
This qualitative study introduces the broad and inclusive concept of the "inner life of physicians" and analyzes the written reflections (N = 756) of family medicine residents (N = 33) during their residency as indicative of the physicians' inner lives. Residents completed reflective entries without specific prompts. Researchers describe unsolicited emergent categorical themes indicative of a robust inner life of the physician. Nurturing physicians' inner life through reflection allows physicians to recognize, identify, and respond to daily emotional events...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Religion and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421563/the-current-utilization-and-perceptions-of-prescription-drug-monitoring-programs-among-emergency-medicine-providers-in-florida
#9
Henry W Young, Joseph A Tyndall, Linda B Cottler
BACKGROUND: Pain is among the most commonly treated symptoms in the emergency department, and opioids are commonly prescribed from the emergency department to treat moderate to severe pain. Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMP) can be used to assist physicians identify individuals at increased risk to misuse or abuse opioids. While the use of the PDMP has been shown useful among clinicians, in the past, utilization of the PDMP has been less than optimal. The objective of this study was to assess the current utilization and perceptions of the prescription drug monitoring program among emergency medicine providers in Florida...
December 2017: International Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419618/correspondence-response-to-letter-to-the-editor-ultrasound-assisted-lumbar-puncture-on-infants-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#10
Michael Gorn
We would like to thank our reader for his/her interest in our work and continuing support of point-of-care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine. Our study was conducted at a large academic emergency department with pediatrics and emergency medicine residents, nurse practitioners who function at or above the level of a senior resident (PGY-3 and 4), and pediatric emergency fellows who function as attending physicians. As a routine, all initial lumbar puncture (LP) attempts are made by learners. This article is protected by copyright...
April 17, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28412072/do-slow-and-steady-residents-win-the-race-modeling-the-effects-of-peak-and-overall-resident-productivity-in-the-emergency-department
#11
Joshua W Joseph, Victor Novack, Matthew L Wong, Larry A Nathanson, Leon D Sanchez
BACKGROUND: Emergency medicine residents need to be staffed in a way that balances operational needs with their educational experience. Key to developing an optimal schedule is knowing a resident's expected productivity, a poorly understood metric. OBJECTIVE: We sought to measure how a resident's busiest (peak) workload affects their overall productivity for the shift. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, observational study of resident productivity at an urban, tertiary care center with a 3-year Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved emergency medicine training program, with 55,000 visits annually...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28408233/securing-a-chest-tube-properly-a-simple-framework-for-teaching-emergency-medicine-residents-and-assessing-their-technical-abilities
#12
Raaj K Ruparel, Torrey A Laack, Rushin D Brahmbhatt, Phillip G Rowse, Johnathon M Aho, Yazan N AlJamal, Brian D Kim, David S Morris, David R Farley, Ronna L Campbell
BACKGROUND: Quality-improvement efforts at our institution have identified chest tube dislodgement as a preventable complication of tube thoracostomy. Because proper fixation techniques are not well described in the literature and are seldom formally taught, techniques vary among residents. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to develop and test a framework for teaching and assessing chest tube securement. METHODS: A repeated-measures study design was used...
April 10, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406108/specialty-preferences-and-motivating-factors-a-national-survey-on-medical-students-from-five-uae-medical-schools
#13
Mahera Abdulrahman, Maryam Makki, Sami Shaaban, Maryam Al Shamsi, Manda Venkatramana, Nabil Sulaiman, Manal M Sami, Dima K Abdelmannan, AbdulJabbar M A Salih, Laila AlShaer
BACKGROUND: Workforce planning is critical for being able to deliver appropriate health service and thus is relevant to medical education. It is, therefore, important to understand medical students' future specialty choices and the factors that influence them. This study was conducted to identify, explore, and analyze the factors influencing specialty preferences among medical students of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). METHODS: A multiyear, multicenter survey of medical student career choice was conducted with all five UAE medical schools...
September 2016: Education for Health: Change in Training & Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405061/emergency-department-discharge-prescription-errors-in-an-academic-medical-center
#14
Kelly A Murray, April Belanger, Lauren T Devine, Aaron Lane, Michelle E Condren
This study described discharge prescription medication errors written for emergency department patients. This study used content analysis in a cross-sectional design to systematically categorize prescription errors found in a report of 1000 discharge prescriptions submitted in the electronic medical record in February 2015. Two pharmacy team members reviewed the discharge prescription list for errors. Open-ended data were coded by an additional rater for agreement on coding categories. Coding was based upon majority rule...
April 2017: Proceedings of the Baylor University Medical Center
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401622/predicting-mortality-in-the-emergency-department-external-validation-and-derivation-of-a-clinical-prediction-tool
#15
Rajat N Moman, Caitlin Loprinzi Brauer, Katherine M Kelsey, Rachel D Havyer, Christine M Lohse, M Fernanda Bellolio
BACKGROUND: he Choosing Wisely campaign has called for better engagement of palliative and hospice care services for patients in the emergency department (ED). PREDICT is a clinical prediction tool that was derived in an Australian ED cohort. It assesses a patient's risk of mortality at one year to select those who would benefit from advanced care planning. Such goals of care discussion can improve patients' ability to communicate what they want out of their healthcare and, in cases of end-of-life, potentially reduce the number of futile interventions...
April 12, 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389399/integrating-musculoskeletal-education-and-patient-care-at-medical-student-run-free-clinics
#16
Thomas McQuillan, Nate Wilcox-Fogel, Emily Kraus, Amy Ladd, Michael Fredericson
BACKGROUND: Student-run free clinics (SRFCs) have emerged as an important educational component of United States (US) medical schools. Despite the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) problems presenting to SRFCs, students and clinics are often unprepared to diagnose and treat common MSK complaints. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the scope of diagnosis and treatment at a medical student-run free clinic specializing in musculoskeletal care utilizing physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents...
April 4, 2017: PM & R: the Journal of Injury, Function, and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379822/improving-patient-clinician-conversations-during-annual-wellness-visits
#17
Zsolt J Nagykaldi, Ami Dave, Connor J Kristof, Tanya N Watts, Sravanthi Utpala, Elizabeth Wickersham
BACKGROUND: Health risk assessments (HRAs) have been implemented and studied for decades in various settings, but little is known about the effect of introducing HRAs on the dynamics and content of patient-clinician conversations during Medicare Annual Wellness Visits (AWVs) and whether the effective use of HRAs requires additional training and resources. METHODS: We used Conversation Analysis techniques to analyze 40 AWVs conducted in an academic family medicine residency practice...
March 2017: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28374350/teaching-the-basics-development-and-validation-of-a-distal-radius-reduction-and-casting-model
#18
Mark A Seeley, Peter D Fabricant, J Todd R Lawrence
BACKGROUND: Approximately one-third of reduced pediatric distal radius fractures redisplace, resulting in further treatment. Two major modifiable risk factors for loss of reduction are reduction adequacy and cast quality. Closed reduction and immobilization of distal radius fractures is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education residency milestone. Teaching and assessing competency could be improved with a life-like simulation training tool. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: Our goal was to develop and validate a realistic distal radius fracture reduction and casting simulator as determined by (1) a questionnaire regarding the "realism" of the model and (2) the quantitative assessments of reduction time, residual angulation, and displacement...
April 3, 2017: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370143/inter-rater-reliability-of-sonographic-optic-nerve-sheath-diameter-measurements-by-emergency-medicine-physicians
#19
Stephanie Oberfoell, David Murphy, Andrew French, Stacy Trent, David Richards
OBJECTIVES: To compare the degree of agreement of sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurements by ultrasound fellowship-trained and resident emergency medicine (EM) physicians. METHODS: Ten ultrasound fellowship-trained EM attending physicians from multiple institutions and 51 resident EM physicians at a single residency were enrolled to measure the ONSD using a computerized ruler on five separate still-frame sonograms of adult eyes that included the retrobulbar optic nerve...
April 3, 2017: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine: Official Journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28365188/implementation-and-assessment-of-a-training-course-for-residents-in-neonatology-and-pediatric-emergency-medicine
#20
D Brossier, A Bellot, F Villedieu, L Fazilleau, J Brouard, B Guillois
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Residents must balance patient care and the ongoing acquisition of medical knowledge. With increasing clinical responsibilities and patient overload, medical training is often left aside. In 2010, we designed and implemented a training course in neonatology and pediatric emergency medicine for residents in pediatrics, in order to improve their medical education. The course was made of didactic sessions and several simulation-based seminars for each year of residency...
May 2017: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
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