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Huntington disease

Joseph Ochaba, Eva L Morozko, Jacqueline G O'Rourke, Leslie M Thompson
The accumulation of misfolded proteins is central to pathology in Huntington's disease (HD) and many other neurodegenerative disorders. Specifically, a key pathological feature of HD is the aberrant accumulation of mutant HTT (mHTT) protein into high molecular weight complexes and intracellular inclusion bodies composed of fragments and other proteins. Conventional methods to measure and understand the contributions of various forms of mHTT-containing aggregates include fluorescence microscopy, western blot analysis, and filter trap assays...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Andrea K H Stavoe, Erika L F Holzbaur
Neurons are long-lived and highly polarized cells that depend on autophagy to maintain cellular homeostasis. The robust, constitutive biogenesis of autophagosomes in the distal axon occurs via a conserved pathway that is required to maintain functional synapses and prevent axon degeneration. Autophagosomes are formed de novo at the axon terminal in a stepwise assembly process, engulfing mitochondrial fragments, aggregated proteins, and bulk cytosol in what appears to be a nonselective uptake mechanism. Following formation, autophagosomes fuse with late endosomes/lysosomes and then are rapidly and efficiently transported along the axon toward the soma, driven by the microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein...
March 13, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Audrey M Bernstein, Robert Ritch, J Mario Wolosin
Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is an age-related disease involving the deposition of aggregated fibrillar material (XFM) at extracellular matrices in tissues that synthesize elastic fibers. Its main morbidity is in the eye, where XFM accumulations form on the surface of the ciliary body, iris and lens. Exfoliation glaucoma (XFG) occurs in a high proportion of persons with XFS and can be a rapidly progressing disease. Worldwide, XFG accounts for about 25% of open-angle glaucoma cases. XFS and XFG show a sharp age-dependence, similarly to the many age-related diseases classified as aggregopathies...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Glaucoma
Chye Soi Moi, Chia Kin Yen, Khuen Yen Ng, Koh Rhun Yian
Protein misfolding and aggregation have been considered the common pathological hallmarks for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). These abnormal proteins aggregation damage mitochondria and induce oxidative stress and resulting neuronal cell death. Prolong neuronal damage activates microglia and astrocytes, development of inflammation reaction and further promotes neurodegeneration. Thus, elimination of abnormal proteins aggregation without eliciting any adverse effects are the main treatment strategies...
March 15, 2018: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Tiffany A Thibaudeau, Raymond T Anderson, David M Smith
Protein accumulation and aggregation with a concomitant loss of proteostasis often contribute to neurodegenerative diseases, and the ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a major role in protein degradation and proteostasis. Here, we show that three different proteins from Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease that misfold and oligomerize into a shared three-dimensional structure potently impair the proteasome. This study indicates that the shared conformation allows these oligomers to bind and inhibit the proteasome with low nanomolar affinity, impairing ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteasome function in brain lysates...
March 15, 2018: Nature Communications
Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mirza A Hammad, Rana Adnan Tahir, Hafiza Nisha Akram, Faheem Ahmad
BACKGROUND: As the number of elderly persons increases, neurodegenerative diseases are becoming ubiquitous. There is currently a great need for knowledge concerning management of old-age neurodegenerative diseases; the most important of which are: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the potential of computationally predicted molecules and targets against neurodegenerative diseases...
March 15, 2018: Current Neuropharmacology
Julie A Reisz, Alexander S Barrett, Travis Nemkov, Kirk C Hansen, Angelo D'Alessandro
Proteins have been historically regarded as "nature's robots": Molecular machines that are essential to cellular/extracellular physical mechanical properties and catalyze key reactions for cell/system viability. However, these robots are kept in check by other protein-based machinery to preserve proteome integrity and stability. During aging, protein homeostasis is challenged by oxidation, decreased synthesis, and increasingly inefficient mechanisms responsible for repairing or degrading damaged proteins...
March 14, 2018: Expert Review of Proteomics
Elena Bellosta Diago, Jesús Pérez-Pérez, Sonia Santos Lasaosa, Alejandro Viloria Alebesque, Saül Martínez-Horta, Jaime Kulisevsky, Javier López Del Val
Cardiovascular events are a major cause of early death in the Huntington's disease (HD) population. Dysautonomia as well as deterioration of circadian rhythms can be detected early in the disease progression and can have profound effects on cardiac health. The aim of the present study was to determine if HD patients and premanifest mutation carriers present a higher risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than non-mutation carrying controls METHODS: Prospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study of 38 HD mutation carriers (23 premanifest and 15 early-stage patients) compared to 38 age- and gender-matched healthy controls...
March 14, 2018: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Daphne Stam, Yun-An Huang, Jan Van den Stock
Personality reflects the set of psychological traits and mechanisms characteristic for an individual. Geno-neuro-biologically inspired personality accounts have proposed a set of temperaments and characters that jointly compose personality profiles. The present study addresses the link between neurobiology and personality and investigates the association between temperament traits and regional gray matter volume. Furthermore, the specificity of these associations as well as the underlying components that drive the association are addressed...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Magdalena Dabrowska, Wojciech Juzwa, Wlodzimierz J Krzyzosiak, Marta Olejniczak
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of CAG repeats in the first exon of the huntingtin gene ( HTT ). The accumulation of polyglutamine-rich huntingtin proteins affects various cellular functions and causes selective degeneration of neurons in the striatum. Therapeutic strategies used to date to silence the expression of mutant HTT include antisense oligonucleotides, RNA interference-based approaches and, recently, genome editing with the CRISPR/Cas9 system...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Maria V Soloveva, Sharna D Jamadar, Govinda Poudel, Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis
The 'reserve' hypothesis posits that the brain undergoes structural and functional reorganisation to actively cope with brain damage or disease. Consistent with passive and active components of 'reserve', the brain moderates its biological substrates (brain reserve) and differentially changes the level of neural activity in tasks-specific networks and/or by recruiting additional non-task related brain regions (cognitive reserve) to optimise behavioural performance. How the 'reserve' hypothesis applies in neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) remains unknown...
March 10, 2018: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Laurie Galvan, Laetitia Francelle, Marie-Claude Gaillard, Lucie de Longprez, Maria-Angeles Carrillo-de Sauvage, Géraldine Liot, Karine Cambon, Lev Stimmer, Sophie Luccantoni, Julien Flament, Julien Valette, Michel de Chaldée, Gwenaelle Auregan, Martine Guillermier, Charlène Joséphine, Fanny Petit, Caroline Jan, Margot Jarrige, Noëlle Dufour, Gilles Bonvento, Sandrine Humbert, Frédéric Saudou, Philippe Hantraye, Karine Merienne, Alexis-Pierre Bemelmans, Anselme L Perrier, Nicole Déglon, Emmanuel Brouillet
The neurobiological functions of a number of kinases expressed in the brain are unknown. Here, we report new findings on DCLK3 (doublecortin like kinase 3), which is preferentially expressed in neurons in the striatum and dentate gyrus. Its function has never been investigated. DCLK3 expression is markedly reduced in Huntington's disease. Recent data obtained in studies related to cancer suggest DCLK3 could have an anti-apoptotic effect. Thus, we hypothesized that early loss of DCLK3 in Huntington's disease may render striatal neurons more susceptible to mutant huntingtin (mHtt)...
March 9, 2018: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
Priscila A C Valadão, Matheus P S M Gomes, Bárbara C Aragão, Hermann A Rodrigues, Jéssica N Andrade, Rubens Garcias, Julliane V Joviano-Santos, Murilo A Luiz, Wallace L Camargo, Lígia A Naves, Christopher Kushmerick, Walter L G Cavalcante, Márcia Gallacci, Itamar C G de Jesus, Silvia Guatimosim, Cristina Guatimosim
Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by chorea, incoordination, and psychiatric and behavioral symptoms. The leading cause of death in HD patients is aspiration pneumonia, associated with respiratory dysfunction, decreased respiratory muscle strength and dysphagia. Although most of the motor symptoms are derived from alterations in the central nervous system, some might be associated with changes in the components of motor units (MU). To explore this hypothesis, we evaluated morphofunctional aspects of the diaphragm muscle in a mouse model of HD (BACHD)...
March 9, 2018: Neurochemistry International
Bindu D Paul, Juan I Sbodio, Solomon H Snyder
Besides its essential role in protein synthesis, cysteine plays vital roles in redox homeostasis, being a component of the major antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and a potent antioxidant by itself. In addition, cysteine undergoes a variety of post-translational modifications that modulate several physiological processes. It is becoming increasingly clear that redox-modulated events play important roles not only in peripheral tissues but also in the brain where cysteine disposition is central to these pathways...
March 9, 2018: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
Lora Minkova, Sarah Gregory, Rachael I Scahill, Ahmed Abdulkadir, Christoph P Kaller, Jessica Peter, Jeffrey D Long, Julie C Stout, Ralf Reilmann, Raymund A Roos, Alexandra Durr, Blair R Leavitt, Sarah J Tabrizi, Stefan Klöppel
Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that can be genetically confirmed with certainty decades before clinical onset. This allows the investigation of functional and structural changes in HD many years prior to disease onset, which may reveal important mechanistic insights into brain function, structure and organization in general. While regional atrophy is present at early stages of HD, it is still unclear if both hemispheres are equally affected by neurodegeneration and how the extent of asymmetry affects domain-specific functional decline...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
Marco Caterino, Tiziana Squillaro, Daniela Montesarchio, Antonio Giordano, Concetta Giancola, Mariarosa A B Melone
Huntington's disease is a dreadful, incurable disorder. It springs from the autosomal dominant mutation in the first exon of the HTT gene, which encodes for the huntingtin protein (HTT) and results in progressive neurodegeneration. Thus far, all the attempted approaches to tackle the mutant HTT-induced toxicity causing this disease have failed. The mutant protein comes with the aberrantly expanded poly-glutamine tract. It is primarily to blame for the build-up of β-amyloid-like HTT aggregates, deleterious once broadened beyond the critical ∼35-37 repeats threshold...
March 8, 2018: Neuropharmacology
N Cabezas-Llobet, L Vidal-Sancho, M Masana, A Fournier, J Alberch, D Vaudry, X Xifró
Deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity result in cognitive impairment in Huntington's disease (HD). Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide that exerts neuroprotective actions, mainly through the PAC1 receptor. However, the role of PACAP in cognition is poorly understood, and no data exists in the context of Huntington's disease (HD). Here, we investigated the ability of PACAP receptor stimulation to enhance memory development in HD. First, we observed a hippocampal decline of all three PACAP receptor expressions, i...
March 10, 2018: Molecular Neurobiology
Lauren M Byrne, Filipe B Rodrigues, Eileanoir B Johnson, Enrico De Vita, Kaj Blennow, Rachael Scahill, Henrik Zetterberg, Amanda Heslegrave, Edward J Wild
Biomarkers of Huntington's disease (HD) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could be of value in elucidating the biology of this genetic neurodegenerative disease, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics. Deranged synaptic and immune function have been reported in HD, and concentrations of the synaptic protein neurogranin and the microglial protein TREM2 are increased in other neurodegenerative diseases. We therefore used ELISAs to quantify neurogranin and TREM2 in CSF samples from HD mutation carriers and controls...
March 9, 2018: Scientific Reports
Kenneth Maiese
As a result of the advancing age of the global population and the progressive increase in lifespan, neurodegenerative disorders continue to increase in incidence throughout the world. New strategies for neurodegenerative disorders involve the novel pathways of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the silent mating-type information regulation 2 homolog 1 ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) (SIRT1) that can modulate pathways of apoptosis and autophagy. The pathways of mTOR and SIRT1 are closely integrated...
March 9, 2018: Biochemical Society Transactions
Alejandro López-Hurtado, Daniel F Burgos, Paz González, Xose M Dopazo, Valentina González, Alberto Rábano, Britt Mellström, Jose R Naranjo
The transcriptional repressor DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator) is a multifunctional neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) that controls Ca2+ and protein homeostasis through gene regulation and protein-protein interactions. Downregulation of DREAM is part of an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism that improves ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6) processing, neuronal survival in the striatum, and motor coordination in R6/2 mice, a model of Huntington's disease (HD). Whether modulation of DREAM activity can also ameliorate cognition deficits in HD mice has not been studied...
March 9, 2018: Molecular Brain
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