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T N Hustoft, T Hausken, S O Ystad, J Valeur, K Brokstad, J G Hatlebakk, G A Lied
BACKGROUND: A diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) is increasingly recommended for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We aimed to investigate the effects of a blinded low-FODMAP vs high-fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) diet on symptoms, immune activation, gut microbiota composition, and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). METHODS: Twenty patients with diarrhea-predominant or mixed IBS were instructed to follow a low-FODMAP diet (LFD) throughout a 9-week study period...
October 16, 2016: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
E M M Quigley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
R Laatikainen, J Loponen, R Korpela
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Shanti L Eswaran, William D Chey, Theresa Han-Markey, Sarah Ball, Kenya Jackson
OBJECTIVES: There has been an increasing interest in the role of fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We report results from the first randomized controlled trial of the low FODMAP diet in US adults with IBS and diarrhea (IBS-D). The objectives were to compare the efficacy of the low FODMAP diet vs. a diet based upon modified National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines (mNICE) on overall and individual symptoms in IBS-D patients...
October 11, 2016: American Journal of Gastroenterology
Ishfaq Ahmed, Badal C Roy, Salman A Khan, Seth Septer, Shahid Umar
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn's Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing...
June 15, 2016: Microorganisms
Wei Mon Wong
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional bowel disorder. Up to 96% of IBS patients experience bloating, resulting in poor response to conventional therapies and high consultation rates. Many IBS patients report that food triggers symptoms, particularly diets with poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates, and restrict intake of certain foods to control their symptoms. IBS patients are especially susceptible to an attack due to visceral hypersensitivity. An emerging therapeutic strategy excludes fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) from the diet...
September 2016: Singapore Medical Journal
Korinna Ulbricht, Peter Layer, Viola Andresen
Chronic, non-infectious diarrhea can be caused by a variety of gastrointestinal diseases. In anamnesis, it is important to take accompanying warning symptoms and specific triggers into account. The fecal inflammatory marker calprotectin may help differentiating between organic and functional gastrointestinal disorders, but it is not specific. Among other options, gelling fibres, Loperamide and Cholestyramine as well as probiotics are available for the symptomatic treatment of chronic diarrhea. For long-term treatment of chronic diarrhea with the enkephalinase inhibitor racecadotril, which is approved for acute diarrhea, only limited data are available...
September 2016: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
S L Peters, C K Yao, H Philpott, G W Yelland, J G Muir, P R Gibson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
J Lövdahl, S Störsrud, H Törnblom
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Mohannad Dugum, Kathy Barco, Samita Garg
A diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) has been found to significantly reduce symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The diet is best implemented in two phases: initial strict elimination of foods high in FODMAPs, then gradual reintroduction based on symptoms. Further study of this diet's effect on intestinal microbiota is needed.
September 2016: Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine
C J Tuck, L A Ross, P R Gibson, J S Barrett, J G Muir
BACKGROUND: In healthy individuals, the absorption of fructose in excess of glucose in solution is enhanced by the addition of glucose. The present study aimed to assess the effects of glucose addition to fructose or fructans on absorption patterns and genesis of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with functional bowel disorders. METHODS: Randomised, blinded, cross-over studies were performed in healthy subjects and functional bowel disorder patients with fructose malabsorption...
September 7, 2016: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics: the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association
Dana Lis, Kiran D K Ahuja, Trent Stellingwerff, Cecilia M Kitic, James Fell
We surveyed 910 athletes to assess behaviours towards self-selected food/ingredient avoidance to minimize gastrointestinal distress. Fifty-five percent eliminated at least 1 high fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAP) food/category, with up to 82.6% reporting symptom improvement. In athletes indicating that high FODMAP foods trigger gastrointestinal symptoms, lactose (86.5%) was most frequently eliminated, followed by galactooligosaccharides (23.9%), fructose (23...
September 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
Jørgen Valeur, Arne Gustav Røseth, Torunn Knudsen, Gunn Helen Malmstrøm, Jennifer T Fiennes, Tore Midtvedt, Arnold Berstad
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Dietary restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) may relieve symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether this diet alters microbial fermentation, a process that may be involved in IBS symptom generation. METHODS: Patients with IBS were included consecutively to participate in a 4-week FODMAP restricted diet. IBS symptoms were evaluated by using the IBS severity scoring system (IBS-SSS)...
2016: Digestion
R Laatikainen, J Koskenpato, S-M Hongisto, J Loponen, T Poussa, M Hillilä, R Korpela
BACKGROUND: Grains are high in FODMAPs (Fermentable Oligo-, Di-, Monosaccharides And Polyols) and often considered as triggers of IBS symptoms. AIM: To evaluate if rye bread low in FODMAPs would be better tolerated than regular rye bread in subjects with IBS. METHODS: The study was conducted as a randomised double blind controlled cross-over study (n = 87). Participants were supplied with both regular rye bread and low-FODMAP rye bread for 4 weeks...
September 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Emma P Halmos, Alex Bogatyrev, Elizabeth Ly, Kelly L Liels, Jane G Muir, Peter R Gibson
BACKGROUND: Diarrhea associated with enteral nutrition has been attributed to excessive FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) content of formulas. This study aimed to readdress their FODMAP content by measuring fermentation-specific effects after a formula load in healthy participants and by defining issues with analytical methods. METHODS: Breath hydrogen production expressed as mean area under the curve (AUC) for 12 hours after ingestion of 15 g lactulose or 500 mL of 1 of 2 formulas of seemingly different FODMAP content was evaluated in a double crossover design...
July 12, 2016: JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
S L Peters, C K Yao, H Philpott, G W Yelland, J G Muir, P R Gibson
BACKGROUND: A low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet is effective in treating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). AIM: To compare the effects of gut-directed hypnotherapy to the low FODMAP diet on gastrointestinal symptoms and psychological indices, and assess additive effects. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients were randomised (computer-generated list), to receive hypnotherapy, diet or a combination...
September 2016: Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Wathsala S Nanayakkara, Paula Ml Skidmore, Leigh O'Brien, Tim J Wilkinson, Richard B Gearry
This review summarizes the published clinical studies concerning the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using restriction of Fermentable Oligosaccharide, Disaccharide, Monosaccharide, and Polyols in the diet (low FODMAP diet). In recent years, the data supporting low FODMAP diet for the management of IBS symptoms have emerged, including several randomized controlled trials, case-control studies, and other observational studies. Unlike most dietary manipulations tried in the past to alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms of IBS, all studies on low FODMAP diet have consistently shown symptomatic benefits in the majority of patients with IBS...
2016: Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology
Sadhana Dharmapuri, Kyndal Hettich, Praveen S Goday
There is no diet that is recommended for all individuals. Some special diets (eg, gluten-free for celiac disease) are necessary for health and quality of life. Other diets may be recommended for a short period of time to aid in symptom relief but may not be recommended for the long- term (eg, LFD). Popular diets continue to come and go with varying levels of success. When considering adolescents, continued growth and development are most important, and restrictive diets can lead to nutrient inadequacies and poor growth...
2016: Adolescent Medicine: State of the Art Reviews
Dana M Lis, Kiran D K Ahuja, Trent Stellingwerff, Cecilia M Kitic, James Fell
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Frank M Ruemmele
The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is steadily in the rise in Western as well as in developing countries paralleling the increase of westernized diets, characterized by high protein and fat as well as excessive sugar intake, with less vegetables and fiber. An interesting hypothesis is that environmental (food-) triggered changes of the intestinal microbiome might cause a proinflammatory state preceding the development of IBD. Indeed, an intact intestinal epithelial barrier assuring a normal bacterial clearance of the intestinal surface is crucial to guarantee intestinal homeostasis...
2016: Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism
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