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James P Roach, Aleksandra Pidde, Eitan Katz, Jiaxing Wu, Nicolette Ognjanovski, Sara J Aton, Michal R Zochowski
Network oscillations across and within brain areas are critical for learning and performance of memory tasks. While a large amount of work has focused on the generation of neural oscillations, their effect on neuronal populations' spiking activity and information encoding is less known. Here, we use computational modeling to demonstrate that a shift in resonance responses can interact with oscillating input to ensure that networks of neurons properly encode new information represented in external inputs to the weights of recurrent synaptic connections...
March 15, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Stefan Elmer, Lutz Jäncke
Numerous studies have documented the behavioral advantages conferred on professional musicians and children undergoing music training in processing speech sounds varying in the spectral and temporal dimensions. These beneficial effects have previously often been associated with local functional and structural changes in the auditory cortex (AC). However, this perspective is oversimplified, in that it does not take into account the intrinsic organization of the human brain, namely, neural networks and oscillatory dynamics...
March 15, 2018: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
W Su, Y Guo, R Erdélyi, Z J Ning, M D Ding, X Cheng, B L Tan
Coronal loops exist ubiquitously in the solar atmosphere. These loops puzzle astronomers over half a century. Solar magneto-seismology (SMS) provides a unique way to constrain the physical parameters of coronal loops. Here, we study the evolution of oscillations of a coronal loop observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). We measure geometric and physical parameters of the loop oscillations. In particular, we find that the mean period of the oscillations increased from 1048 to 1264 s during three oscillatory cycles...
March 14, 2018: Scientific Reports
Bernadette M Glasheen, Seemanti Ramanath, Monica Patel, Debra Sheppard, Joy T Puthawala, Lauren A Riley, Douglas M Swank
Muscles have evolved to power a wide variety of movements. A protein component critical to varying power generation is the myosin isoform present in the muscle. However, how functional variation in muscle arises from myosin structure is not well understood. We studied the influence of the converter, a myosin structural region at the junction of the lever arm and catalytic domain, using Drosophila because its single myosin heavy chain gene expresses five alternative converter versions (11a-e). We created five transgenic fly lines, each forced to express one of the converter versions in their indirect flight muscle (IFM) fibers...
March 13, 2018: Biophysical Journal
Nina Wolinski, Nicholas R Cooper, Paul Sauseng, Vincenzo Romei
The speed of theta brain oscillatory activity is thought to play a key role in determining working memory (WM) capacity. Individual differences in the length of a theta cycle (ranging between 4 and 7 Hz) might determine how many gamma cycles (>30 Hz) can be nested into a theta wave. Gamma cycles are thought to represent single memory items; therefore, this interplay could determine individual memory capacity. We directly tested this hypothesis by means of parietal transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) set at slower (4 Hz) and faster (7 Hz) theta frequencies during a visuospatial WM paradigm...
March 14, 2018: PLoS Biology
Tianxiao Jiang, Su Liu, Giuseppe Pellizzer, Aydin Aydoseli, Sacit Karamursel, Pulat A Sabanci, Altay Sencer, Candan Gurses, Nuri F Ince
Functional mapping of eloquent cortex before the resection of a tumor is a critical procedure for optimizing survival and quality of life. In order to locate the hand area of the motor cortex in two patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG), we recorded electrocorticogram (ECoG) from a 113 channel hybrid high-density grid (64 large contacts with diameter of 2.7 mm and 49 small contacts with diameter of 1 mm) while they executed hand clenching movements. We investigated the spatio-spectral characteristics of the neural oscillatory activity and observed that, in both patients, the hand movements were consistently associated with a wide spread power decrease in the low frequency band (LFB: 8-32 Hz) and a more localized power increase in the high frequency band (HFB: 60-280 Hz) within the sensorimotor region...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Nicole Varble, Vincent M Tutino, Jihnhee Yu, Ashish Sonig, Adnan H Siddiqui, Jason M Davies, Hui Meng
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many ruptured intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are small. Clinical presentations suggest that small and large IAs could have different phenotypes. It is unknown if small and large IAs have different characteristics that discriminate rupture. METHODS: We analyzed morphological, hemodynamic, and clinical parameters of 413 retrospectively collected IAs (training cohort; 102 ruptured IAs). Hierarchal cluster analysis was performed to determine a size cutoff to dichotomize the IA population into small and large IAs...
March 13, 2018: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Li-Yuan Chen, Maxime Lévesque, Mauro Cataldi, Massimo Avoli
The muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol (CCh) can induce activity in the theta range (4 - 15 Hz) in the entorhinal cortex (EC), but the underlying network mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the interplay between interneurons and principal cells in the EC during CCh-induced theta-like field oscillations in an in vitro brain slice preparation using tetrodes. Field oscillations at 10.1 Hz (IQR = 9.5 - 10.9 Hz) occurred during bath application of CCh (100 μM; n = 32 experiments) and were associated with single-unit (n = 189) firing...
March 10, 2018: Neuroscience
Tomasz Zbigniew Osmałek, Anna Froelich, Barbara Jadach, Marek Krakowski
Purpose Most of the studies concerning gellan have been focused on its application as a food ingredient, however, gellan is often considered as a candidate for the development of novel pharmaceutical formulations. Taking into account that gellan is ion-sensitive, it can be assumed that its initial mechanical properties can change upon contact with body secretions. Therefore, the aim of the work was to investigate the rheological properties of pure high-acyl gellan gum hydrogel (0.4%) and its mixtures with selected simulated body fluids...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Biomaterials Applications
Nataliya Kraynyukova, Tatjana Tchumatchenko
A hallmark of cortical circuits is their versatility. They can perform multiple fundamental computations such as normalization, memory storage, and rhythm generation. Yet it is far from clear how such versatility can be achieved in a single circuit, given that specialized models are often needed to replicate each computation. Here, we show that the stabilized supralinear network (SSN) model, which was originally proposed for sensory integration phenomena such as contrast invariance, normalization, and surround suppression, can give rise to dynamic cortical features of working memory, persistent activity, and rhythm generation...
March 12, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Avniel Singh Ghuman, Rebecca N van den Honert, Theodore J Huppert, Gregory L Wallace, Alex Martin
BACKGROUND: Prevailing theories suggest that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) results from impaired brain communication, causing aberrant synchrony among neuronal populations. However, it remains debated whether synchrony abnormalities are among local or long-range circuits, are circuit specific or are generalized, reflect hypersynchrony or reflect hyposynchrony, and are frequency band-specific or are distributed across the frequency spectrum. METHODS: To help clarify these unresolved questions, we recorded spontaneous magnetoencephalography data and used a data-driven, whole-brain analysis of frequency-specific interregional synchrony in higher-functioning adolescents and adults, with 17 ASD and 18 control subjects matched on age, IQ, and sex, and equal for motion...
April 2017: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
Christie L Glau, Thomas W Conlon, Adam S Himebauch, Donald L Boyer, Samuel A Rosenblatt, Akira Nishisaki
High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is a mode of mechanical ventilation used in severe pediatric respiratory failure. Thoracic ultrasound (US) is a powerful tool for diagnosing acute pathophysiologic conditions during spontaneous respiration and conventional noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation differs from conventional modes of ventilation in that it does not primarily use bulk flow delivery for gas exchange but, rather, a number of alternative mechanisms as the result of pressure variations oscillating around a constant distending pressure...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Ultrasound in Medicine: Official Journal of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine
Marcel Heers, Moritz Helias, Tanguy Hedrich, Matthias Dümpelmann, Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Tonio Ball
The foremost aim of presurgical epilepsy evaluation is the delineation of the seizure onset zone (SOZ). There is increasing evidence that fast epileptic activity (FEA, 14-250 Hz) occurring interictally, i.e. between seizures, is predominantly localized within the SOZ. Currently it is unknown, which frequency band of FEA performs best in identifying the SOZ, although prior studies suggest highest concordance of spectral changes with the SOZ for high frequency changes. We suspected that FEA reflects dampened oscillations in local cortical excitatory-inhibitory neural networks, and that interictal FEA in the SOZ is a consequence of reduced oscillatory damping...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
R L van den Brink, S Nieuwenhuis, G J M van Boxtel, G van Luijtelaar, H J Eilander, V J M Wijnen
For some patients, coma is followed by a state of unresponsiveness, while other patients develop signs of awareness. In practice, detecting signs of awareness may be hindered by possible impairments in the patient's motoric, sensory, or cognitive abilities, resulting in a substantial proportion of misdiagnosed disorders of consciousness. Task-free paradigms that are independent of the patient's sensorimotor and neurocognitive abilities may offer a solution to this challenge. A limitation of previous research is that the large majority of studies on the pathophysiological processes underlying disorders of consciousness have been conducted using cross-sectional designs...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
Elizabeth Heinrichs-Graham, Timothy J McDermott, Mackenzie S Mills, Alex I Wiesman, Yu-Ping Wang, Julia M Stephen, Vince D Calhoun, Tony W Wilson
Numerous studies connect beta oscillations in the motor cortices to volitional movement, and beta is known to be aberrant in multiple movement disorders. However, the dynamic interplay between these beta oscillations, motor performance, and spontaneous beta power (e.g., during rest) in the motor cortices remains unknown. This study utilized magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate these three parameters and their lifespan trajectory in 57 healthy participants aged 9-75 years old. Movement-related beta activity was imaged using a beamforming approach, and voxel time series data were extracted from the peak voxels in the primary motor cortices...
March 2, 2018: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Hansol X Ryu, Sukyung Park
To enhance the wearability of portable motion-monitoring devices, the size and number of sensors are minimized, but at the expense of quality and quantity of data collected. For example, owing to the size and weight of low-frequency force transducers, most currently available wearable gait measurement systems provide only limited, if any, elements of ground reaction force (GRF) data. To obtain the most GRF information possible with a minimal use of sensors, we propose a GRF estimation method based on biomechanical knowledge of human walking...
February 9, 2018: Journal of Biomechanics
Matthew J Brookes, Madeleine J Groom, Lucrezia Liuzzi, Ryan M Hill, Helen J F Smith, Paul M Briley, Emma L Hall, Benjamin A E Hunt, Lauren E Gascoyne, Margot J Taylor, Peter F Liddle, Peter G Morris, Mark W Woolrich, Elizabeth B Liddle
Network connectivity is an integral feature of human brain function, and characterising its maturational trajectory is a critical step towards understanding healthy and atypical neurodevelopment. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate both stationary (i.e. time averaged) and rapidly modulating (dynamic) electrophysiological connectivity, in participants aged from mid-childhood to early adulthood (youngest participant 9 years old; oldest participant 25 years old). Stationary functional connectivity (measured via inter-regional coordination of neural oscillations) increased with age in the alpha and beta frequency bands, particularly in bilateral parietal and temporo-parietal connections...
March 7, 2018: NeuroImage
Melle J W van der Molen, Anita Harrewijn, P Michiel Westenberg
The current study examined neural and behavioral responses to social evaluative feedback processing in social anxiety. Twenty-two non-socially and 17 socially anxious females (mean age = 19.57 years) participated in a Social Judgment Paradigm in which they received acceptance/rejection feedback that was either congruent or incongruent with their prior predictions. Results indicated that socially anxious participants believed they would receive less social acceptance feedback than non-socially anxious participants...
March 7, 2018: Biological Psychology
S Pal, S Ghorai, M Banerjee
Non-local reaction-diffusion equation is an important area to study the dynamics of the individuals which compete for resources. In this paper, we describe a prey-dependent predator-prey model with Holling type II functional response with a generalist predator. In particular, we want to see the behavior of the system in the presence of non-local interaction. Introduction of non-local intraspecific competition in prey population leads to some new characteristics in comparison with the local model. Comparisons have been made between the local and non-local interactions of the system...
March 9, 2018: Bulletin of Mathematical Biology
Joshua C Tremblay, Connor A Howe, Philip N Ainslie, Kyra Ellen Pyke
Experimentally-induced oscillatory shear stress (OSS) and hypoxia reduce endothelial function in humans. Acute and sustained hypoxia may cause increases in resting OSS; however, whether this influences endothelial susceptibility to further increases in OSS is unknown. Healthy lowlanders (n=15, 30{plus minus}6 years [mean{plus minus}SD]) participated in three OSS interventions; two at sea level (normoxia and following 20-minutes of normobaric hypoxia [acute hypoxia, 11% O2 ]) and one 5-7 days after a 9-day ascent to 5050m (sustained hypoxia)...
March 9, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
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