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Oral health critical

I Absah, A Rishi, N J Talley, D Katzka, M Halland
BACKGROUND: Rumination syndrome is a functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by effortless and repetitive regurgitation of recently ingested food from the stomach to the oral cavity followed by either re-swallowing or spitting. Rumination is thought to occur due to a reversal of the esophagogastric pressure gradient. This is achieved by a coordinated abdominothoracic maneuver consisting of a thoracic suction, crural diaphragm relaxation and an increase in intragastric pressure...
October 20, 2016: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
Patti Rager Zuzelo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
Giovanni Ravasi, Beatriz Grinsztejn, Ricardo Baruch, Juan Vicente Guanira, Ricardo Luque, Carlos F Cáceres, Massimo Ghidinelli
INTRODUCTION: Despite progress in scaling up antiretroviral treatment, HIV prevention strategies have not been successful in significantly curbing HIV incidence in Latin America. HIV prevention interventions need to be expanded to target the most affected key populations with a combination approach, including new high impact technologies. Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as additional prevention choice for individuals at higher risk of infection and could become a cost-effective prevention tool...
2016: Journal of the International AIDS Society
Rafael Bello Corassa, Carmen Aceijas, Paula Aryane Brito Alves, Hemda Garelick
AIMS: This article aimed to provide a critical review of the evolution of Chagas' disease (ChD) in Brazil, its magnitude, historical development and management, and challenges for the future. METHODS: A literature search was performed using PubMed, SciELO and Google Scholar and throughout collected articles' references. Narrative analysis was structured around five main themes identified: vector transmission, control programme, transfusion, oral and congenital transmission...
October 10, 2016: Perspectives in Public Health
Feng Chen, Jun Jiang, Dan-Dan Tian, Qi Wen, Yong-Hui Li, Jun-Qing Zhang, Chen Cheng, Tengfei Wang
Cardiovascular disease still remains the primary cause of death worldwide and the obesity is becoming recognized as one of the most critical contributing risk factors. The increased prevalence of obesity casts a cloud over the global health and the whole societies will still be burdened in the future. Therefore, prevention and therapy of obesity is a beneficial strategy for the prevention of chronic cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that gut microbiota takes part in human health and disease including obesity...
October 14, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Yoshihiro Kokubo
Hypertension is one of the strongest risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recently, accumulating evidence also indicates that hypertension has been linked with non-cardiovascular diseases including dementia, cancer, oral health diseases and so on. In general, elderly individuals tend to have multiple diseases as getting older. Preventing of hypertension is also benefit for other diseases.In the Hisayama Study, hypertension increased the risk of vascular dementia, but were not associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer disease, and that subjects with hypertension in midlife and normotension and hypertension in late-life increased risks of incident vascular dementia...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Kay Choong See, Si Yu Peng, Jason Phua, Chew Lai Sum, Johncy Concepcion
BACKGROUND: Swallowing difficulties are common, and dysphagia occurs frequently in intensive care unit (ICU) patients after extubation. Yet, no guidelines on postextubation swallowing assessment exist. We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of nurse-performed screening (NPS) for postextubation dysphagia in the medical ICU. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of mechanically ventilated patients who were extubated in a 20-bed medical ICU...
October 12, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Cameron L Randall, John R Shaffer, Daniel W McNeil, Richard J Crout, Robert J Weyant, Mary L Marazita
OBJECTIVES: Dental fear is a prevalent problem that impacts dental treatment-seeking behavior and thus oral, systemic, and psychological health. Among other important predictors, fear of pain has been shown to be a critical component of dental fear. While learning history (id est, past experience) is known to shape development and maintenance of dental fear and fear of pain, minimal work has addressed genetic etiological variables for these healthcare-related anxieties. With the aim of coming to a more complete conceptualization of dental fear, this study assessed the heritability of dental fear and fear of pain and elucidated the role of genetics in the relation between the constructs...
October 11, 2016: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology
Stephanie Rupp, Philippe Ambata, Victor Narat, Tamara Giles-Vernick
In the absence of direct evidence, an imagined "cut hunter" stands in for the index patient of pandemic HIV/AIDS. During the early years of colonial rule, this explanation goes, a hunter was cut or injured from hunting or butchering a chimpanzee infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, resulting in the first sustained human infection with the virus that would emerge as HIV-1M. We argue here that the "cut hunter" relies on a historical misunderstanding and ecological oversimplification of human-chimpanzee (Pan Troglodytes troglodytes) interactions that facilitated pathogenic transmission...
October 7, 2016: EcoHealth
Mark Tambe Keboa, Natalie Hiles, Mary Ellen Macdonald
INTRODUCTION: Improving the oral health of refugees and asylum seekers is a global priority, yet little is known about the overall burden of oral diseases and their causes for this population. OBJECTIVE: To synthesize available evidence on the oral health of, and access to oral health care by this population. METHODS: Using a scoping review methodology, we retrieved 3321 records from eight databases and grey literature; 44 publications met the following inclusion criteria: empirical research focused on refugees and/or asylum seekers' oral health, published between 1990 and 2014 in English, French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish...
October 7, 2016: Globalization and Health
Heberto Arboleya Casanova, Héctor Marino Zavala Sánchez, Angélica María Hernández Fernández, Dulce Janeth González Herrera
In 2009, with the implementation of the National Hospital Pharmacy Model, Mexico began regulating single-dose drugs. The repackaging of oral drugs is fundamental and critical and should be standardized by Mexican health legislation to enable quality drugs to be dispensed. Data is required on stability, compatibility, drug interactions, containers, and repackaging methods, in order to establish a new expiration date. The literature on health regulations applicable to repackaging was analyzed, revealing major conceptual imprecisions since there is no legislation in Mexico that regulates repackaging; rather, everything is carried out according to pharmacists' recommendations and criteria...
June 2016: Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública, Pan American Journal of Public Health
Margarita Pons-Salort, Natalie A Molodecky, Kathleen M O'Reilly, Mufti Zubair Wadood, Rana M Safdar, Andrew Etsano, Rui Gama Vaz, Hamid Jafari, Nicholas C Grassly, Isobel M Blake
BACKGROUND: Global withdrawal of serotype-2 oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV2) took place in April 2016. This marked a milestone in global polio eradication and was a public health intervention of unprecedented scale, affecting 155 countries. Achieving high levels of serotype-2 population immunity before OPV2 withdrawal was critical to avoid subsequent outbreaks of serotype-2 vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPV2s). METHODS AND FINDINGS: In August 2015, we estimated vaccine-induced population immunity against serotype-2 poliomyelitis for 1 January 2004-30 June 2015 and produced forecasts for April 2016 by district in Nigeria and Pakistan...
October 2016: PLoS Medicine
Ji-Hoi Moon, Jae-Hyung Lee
Human oral cavity contains a highly personalized microbiome that is essential to maintaining health but capable of causing oral and systemic diseases. Thus, an in-depth definition of "healthy oral microbiome" is critical to understanding variations in disease states from preclinical conditions and disease onset through progressive states of disease. With rapid advances in DNA sequencing and analytical technologies, population-based studies have documented the ranges and diversity of both taxonomic compositions and functional potentials observed in the oral microbiome in healthy individuals...
September 29, 2016: BMB Reports
Shepard P Johnson, Kevin C Chung, Lin Zhong, Melissa J Shauver, Michael J Engelsbe, Chad Brummett, Jennifer F Waljee
PURPOSE: To evaluate prolonged opioid use in opioid-naïve patients after common hand surgery procedures in the United States. METHODS: We studied insurance claims from the Truven MarketScan databases to identify opioid-naïve adult patients (no opioid exposure 11 months before the perioperative period) who underwent an elective (carpal tunnel release, carpometacarpal arthroplasty/arthrodesis, cubital tunnel release, or trigger finger release) or trauma-related (closed distal radius fracture fixation, flexor tendon repair, metacarpal fracture fixation, or phalangeal fracture fixation) hand surgery procedure between 2010 and 2012 (N = 77,573 patients)...
September 7, 2016: Journal of Hand Surgery
Tsui-Yun Yang, Hung-Ru Lin
AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To understand taxi drivers' successful experiences of quitting betel nut chewing. BACKGROUND: Previous studies verified that betel nut chewing significantly increases the risk of oral cancer. In Taiwan, taxi drivers work for approximately 10-13 hours per day, and 31.7-80% of them choose to chew betel nuts for their invigorating qualities, which enable them to work more hours and receive more income. DESIGN: A qualitative research design was used...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Manosha Perera, Nezar Noor Al-Hebshi, David J Speicher, Irosha Perera, Newell W Johnson
Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC...
2016: Journal of Oral Microbiology
B Peters, E G P M de Bont, J W L Cals
Amoxicillin and paracetamol are the two most widely prescribed and recommended medicines in children. Due to lack of scientific evidence of the most effective dosage, dosing instructions of both medicines are often unclear. In this article we challenge general practitioners, paediatricians, child-health clinic physicians, ENT specialists, pharmacists and guideline committees to critically evaluate the current dosing instructions of these two medicines. The Netherlands paediatric formulary, the Kinderformularium, should become the primary formulary for children in the Netherlands, but it has to be more in line with daily practice, and basic dosing instructions should be less ambiguous: (a) dosing instructions based on body weight instead of age; b) in case of pain, paracetamol should be given 60 mg/kg/day in four divided doses; (c) in case of common uncomplicated infections, amoxicillin should be given orally 60 mg/kg/day in two divided doses; (d) the following should be mentioned on the antibiotic prescription: the daily dose, the number of divided doses, the duration of therapy, the indication for the prescription, and the child's weight...
2016: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
Matthew Plow, Sabrina Mangal, Kathryn Geither, Meghan Golding
A critical public health objective is to optimize and disseminate self-management interventions for the 56.7 million adults living with chronic disabling conditions in the United States. A possible strategy to optimize the effectiveness of self-management interventions is to understand how best to tailor self-management interventions to the needs and circumstances of each participant. Thus, the purpose of this scoping review was to describe randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of tailored self-management interventions in adults with neurological and musculoskeletal conditions that characteristically result in mobility impairments...
2016: Frontiers in Public Health
Michael D Colvard, Benjamin J Vesper, Linda M Kaste, Jeremy L Hirst, David E Peters, James James, Rodrigo Villalobos, E John Wipfler
Disaster and pandemic response events require an interprofessional team of health care responders to organize and work together in high-pressure, time-critical situations. Civilian oral health care professionals have traditionally been limited to forensic identification of human remains. However, after the bombing of the Twin Towers in New York, federal agencies realized that dentists can play significant roles in disaster and immunization response, especially on interprofessional responder teams. Several states have begun to incorporate dentists into the first responder community...
October 2016: Dental Clinics of North America
Laura B Kaufman, Michelle M Henshaw, Blase P Brown, Joseph M Calabrese
Oral health for the older adult patient is vital for function, comfort, and communication and is a critical component of overall health. Oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal disease, and oral cancer may lead to pain, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. Optimal oral health outcomes are often owing to effective interprofessional collaboration between and among health care providers, in conjunction with patient family members and caregivers. This article highlights 2 cases illustrating how interprofessional team dynamics can affect patient outcomes...
October 2016: Dental Clinics of North America
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