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Nuclear medicine technologist

Philippe Robin, David Bourhis, Brieuc Bernard, Ronan Abgral, Solène Querellou, Alexandra Le Duc-Pennec, Pierre-Yves Le Roux, Pierre-Yves Salaün
Objective: Respiratory motion in18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) induces blurred images, leading to errors in location and quantification for lung and abdominal lesions. Various methods have been developed to correct for these artifacts, and most of current PET/CT scanners are equipped with a respiratory gating system. However, they are not routinely performed because their use is time-consuming. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility and quantitative impact of a systematic respiratory-gated acquisition in unselected patients referred for FDG PET/CT, without increasing acquisition time...
2018: Frontiers in Medicine
Tiffinee Swanson, Thuy D Tran, Lacey Ellingson, Michael K O'Connor, Deborah J Rhodes, Katie N Hunt, Amy L Conners, Carrie B Hruska
Molecular breast imaging (MBI) technologists are required to possess a combination of nuclear medicine skills and mammographic positioning techniques. Currently, no formal programs offer this type of hybrid technologist training. The purpose of this perspective is to provide a best practices guide for technologists performing MBI. Familiarity with best practices may aid in obtaining high-quality MBI examinations by decreasing the likelihood of image artifacts, positioning problems and other factors that contribute to false negative or false positive findings...
February 2, 2018: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Mary Beth Farrell
This article is the second part of continuing education series reviewing basic statistics that nuclear medicine and molecular imaging technologists should understand. In this article, the statistics for evaluating interpretation accuracy, significance and variance are discussed. Throughout the article, actual statistics are pulled from published literature. Part two begins by explaining two methods for quantifying interpretive accuracy: inter-reader and intra-reader reliability. Agreement among readers can simply be expressed by percentage...
February 2, 2018: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Daphnée Villoing, R Craig Yoder, Christopher Passmore, Marie-Odile Bernier, Cari M Kitahara
Purpose To summarize occupational badge doses recorded for a sample of U.S. nuclear medicine technologists. Materials and Methods Nine large U.S. medical institutions identified 208 former and current nuclear medicine technologists certified after 1979 and linked these individuals to historic badge dose records maintained by a commercial dosimetry company (Landauer), yielding a total of 2618 annual dose records. The distributions of annual and cumulative occupational doses were described by using summary statistics...
February 1, 2018: Radiology
Mary Beth Farrell
Molecular imaging technologists are faced with statistics on a daily basis because they image patients who have been selected for diagnostic testing based on analysis of how well the test performs, and because technical factors can influence the performance of any diagnostic test. Choosing what test procedure to perform on which patient is a matter of understanding the patient's pretest likelihood of disease, the performance characteristics of the diagnostic test, and other clinical factors which may impact the usefulness of the results...
December 22, 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Cybil J Nielsen
Introduction: The purpose of this article is to introduce nuclear medicine technology (NMT) educators to a method of incorporating research methodologies into the curriculum. Methods: The research methodology in the NMT program at Indiana University (IU) is taught in five steps (1. Introduction to research articles and statistics 2. Mock project and individual project design 3. Data collection 4. Writing the research paper 5. Presenting the abstract and mentoring new students). These steps could be combined for programs of shorter length or with credit hour restrictions...
December 22, 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Eliseo Vano, Pablo Jimenez, Raul Ramirez, Javier Zarzuela, Ana Maria Larcher, Eduardo Gallego, Santiago Gonzalez, Maria Del Rosario Perez
During the International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine held in Bonn in 2012, several areas for improvement were identified, including specific actions related with justification, optimization, role of manufacturers, radiation protection education and training, strategic research, data collection on medical and occupational exposures, prevention of incidents and accidents, radiation safety culture, risk-benefit dialogue and implementation of the radiation safety standards. The outcomes of the Bonn Conference were summarized in the so-called 'Bonn Call for Action', identifying 10 priority actions to enhance RP in medicine...
December 11, 2017: Journal of Radiological Protection: Official Journal of the Society for Radiological Protection
Norman E Bolus
The purpose of this paper is to review basic radiation biology and associated terminology to impart a better understanding of the importance of basic concepts of ionizing radiation interactions with living tissue. As health care workers in a field that utilizes ionizing radiation, nuclear medicine technologists are concerned about the possible acute and chronic effects of occupational radiation exposure. Technologists should have a clear understanding of what they are exposed to and how their safety could be affected...
December 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Ryota Wada, Takashi Kamiya, Kouichi Fujino, Junpei Ueda, Kayako Isohashi, Mitsuaki Tatsumi, Jun Hatazawa
Generally, FDG-PET/CT image is acquired at the 60th minute after tracer administration. Depending on the clinical case, additional delayed scans may be useful. However, it is difficult to judge whether additional delayed scan is useful or not. The purposes of this study were creation and evaluation of educational programs to help radiological technologists to decide the usefulness of additional delayed scan of FDG-PET/CT. METHODS: Educational programs consisted of the instructional materials and the judgment test of clinical cases...
2017: Nihon Hoshasen Gijutsu Gakkai Zasshi
Razi Muzaffar, Sarah A Frye, Anna McMunn, Kelley Ryan, Ron Lattanze, Medhat M Osman
A novel quality control and quality assurance device provides time-activity curves that can identify and characterize PET/CT radiotracer infiltration at the injection site during the uptake phase. The purpose of this study was to compare rates of infiltration detected by the device with rates detected by physicians. We also assessed the value of using the device to improve injection results in our center. Methods: 109 subjects consented to the study. All had passive device sensors applied to their skin near the injection site and mirrored on the contralateral arm during the entire uptake period...
December 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Marie-Odile Bernier, Neige Journy, Daphnee Villoing, Michele M Doody, Bruce H Alexander, Martha S Linet, Cari M Kitahara
Purpose To estimate the risk of cataract in a cohort of nuclear medicine (NM) radiologic technologists on the basis of their work histories and radiation protection practices. Materials and Methods In the years 2003-2005 and 2012-2013, 42 545 radiologic technologists from a U.S. prospective study completed questionnaires in which they provided information regarding their work histories and cataract histories. Cox proportional hazards models, stratified according to birth-year cohort (born before 1940 or born in 1940 or later) and adjusted for age, sex, and race, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for the risk of cataract in radiologic technologists according to NM work history practices according to decade...
October 11, 2017: Radiology
Pedro Fragoso Costa, Andrea Santos, Giorgio Testanera
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2017: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
April Mann, Mary Beth Farrell, Jessica Williams, Danny Basso
In 2015, the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Technologist Section (SNMMI-TS) launched a multiyear quality initiative to help prepare the technologist workforce for an evidence-based health-care delivery system that focuses on quality. To best implement the quality strategy, the SNMMI-TS first surveyed technologists to ascertain their perception of quality and current measurement of quality indicators. Methods: An internet survey was sent to 27,989 e-mail contacts. Questions related to demographic data, perceptions of quality, quality measurement, and opinions on the minimum level of education are discussed in this article...
June 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Ernest U Ekpo, Beverly Snaith, Martine A Harris, Mark F McEntee
INTRODUCTION: Research is critical to evidence-based practice, and the rapid developments in technology provide opportunities to innovate and improve practice. Little is known about the research profile of the medical radiation science (MRS) profession in Australia and New Zealand (NZ). This study provides a baseline of their doctoral activity. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of MRS professionals in Australia and NZ holding a doctorate or undertaking doctoral studies, was performed using an online tool (Bristol Online Survey(®) , Bristol, UK)...
September 2017: Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences
Narvesh Kumar, Shashwat Verma, Rani Kunti R Singh, Deepanksha Datta, Subhash Chandra Kheruka, Sanjay Gambhir
We present a case study in which artifacts from collimator contamination and patient motion were seen on a bone scan. Any identified artifact must be further investigated and documented so as to detect its source and thus prevent its future occurrence.
September 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Sil Aarts, Forra Cornelis, Yke Zevenboom, Patrick Brokken, Nicole van de Griend, Miriam Spoorenberg, Wendy Ten Bokum, Eveline Wouters
INTRODUCTION: New technology is continuously introduced in health care. The aim of this study was (1) to collect the opinions and experiences of radiographers, nuclear medicine technologists and radiation therapists regarding the technology they use in their profession and (2) to acquire their views regarding the role of technology in their future practice. METHODS: Participants were recruited from five departments in five hospitals in The Netherlands. All radiographers, nuclear medicine therapists and radiation therapists who were working in these departments were invited to participate (n = 252)...
March 2017: Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2017: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Zehra Ozcan, M Fani Bozkurt, Belkıs Erbas, Hatice Durak
Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years...
May 2017: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
B Greenspan
With the profound changes currently occurring in medicine, the role of the medical physicist cannot stagnate, but must evolve to meet the challenges and opportunities that are presented. Medical physicists must understand these changes and establish themselves not only as relevant but as leaders in this new environment. We must increase our presence in clinical settings such as tumor boards, patient rounds, and the development of new diagnosis, imaging, and treatment techniques. By establishing ourselves as competent scientists, we can and must participate in the development of technologies through research, teaching, and clinical implementation...
June 2016: Medical Physics
S Mann, J Nelson, E Samei
PURPOSE: To develop a clinically-deployable, automated process for detecting artifacts in routine nuclear medicine (NM) quality assurance (QA) bar phantom images. METHODS: An artifact detection algorithm was created to analyze bar phantom images as part of an ongoing QA program. A low noise, high resolution reference image was acquired from an x-ray of the bar phantom with a Philips Digital Diagnost system utilizing image stitching. NM bar images, acquired for 5 million counts over a 512×512 matrix, were registered to the template image by maximizing mutual information (MI)...
June 2016: Medical Physics
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