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Meralgia paresthetica

Christian Svendsen Juhl, Martin Ballegaard, Morten H Bestle, Peer Tfelt-Hansen
Meralgia paresthetica (MP) is a mononeuropathy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) caused by external compression of the nerve during its course close to the anterior superior iliac spine. We present a case of a patient with acute respiratory distress induced by Legionella pneumonia who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation. In the ICU, the patient received one session of prone position ventilation for 8.5 consecutive hours. At evaluation six months later, the patient reported persistent bilateral numbness of the anterolateral thigh, which he complained had begun right after he woke up at the ICU...
2016: Case Reports in Critical Care
Yukimori Isoda, Eisaku Imamura, Daisuke Ueno, Tsubasa Akaike, Yoshiki Hamada
Iliac particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM) is still the most predictable autogenous graft material for vertical ridge reconstruction because of its high cell content as well as osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. However, postoperative meralgia paresthetica, gait disturbance, pain, and bleeding have been reported following conventional harvesting from the anterior iliac crest. We present a case of minimally invasive harvesting of iliac PCBM. A short incision was made, and the iliac crest was exposed after elevation of the periosteal membrane...
December 2016: Int J Implant Dent
Domenico Chirchiglia, Attilio Della Torre, Francesco Lavano, Angelo Lavano
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 23, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences
Andrew D Franklin, G Bennett Cierny, Twila R Luckett
Meralgia paresthetica is a chronic pain syndrome that is extremely rare in the pediatric population. It is manifested by hypesthesia or pain in the distribution of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN) and is typically caused by entrapment as the nerve passes deep to the inguinal ligament. This sensory mononeuropathy is rare in children and diagnosis is typically delayed, often leading to prolonged functional impairment and unnecessary medical testing. A 9-year-old girl presented to the pain clinic with a 6-week history of right anterolateral thigh pain first noticed after a nontraumatic cheerleading practice...
September 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
Samuel Arends, Paul Willem Wirtz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuromuscular Disease
Shin-Hyo Lee, Kang-Jae Shin, Young-Chun Gil, Tae-Jun Ha, Ki-Seok Koh, Wu-Chul Song
INTRODUCTION: Compression of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN), known as meralgia paresthetica (MP), is common. We investigated the topographic anatomy of the LFCN focusing on the inguinal ligament and adjacent structures. METHODS: Distances from various bony and soft-tissue landmarks to the LFCN were investigated in 33 formalin-embalmed cadavers. RESULTS: The mean distance from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the LFCN was 8...
August 20, 2016: Muscle & Nerve
Sule Sahin Onat, Ayse Merve Ata, Levent Ozcakar
Meralgia paresthetica refers to the entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve at the level of the inguinal ligament. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve - a purely sensory nerve - arises from the L2 and L3 spinal nerve roots, travels downward lateral to the psoas muscle, and then crosses the iliacus muscle. Close to the anterior superior iliac spine, the nerve courses in contact with the lateral aspect of the inguinal ligament and eventually innervates the lateral thigh. The entrapment syndrome is usually idiopathic but can also ensue due to trauma/overuse, pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors, stretching of the nerve due to prolonged leg/trunk hyperextension, leg length discrepancies, prolonged standing, external compression by belts, weight gain, and tight clothing...
May 2016: Pain Physician
A Bruyere, J J Hidalgo Diaz, P Vernet, S Salazar Botero, S Facca, P-A Liverneaux
To limit the risk of iatrogenic neuroma and recurrence after surgical treatment of meralgia paresthetica, some authors have recently developed a technique of endoscopic neurolysis of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh (LCNT) below the level of the inguinal ligament. We report the case of a robot-assisted endoscopic technique underneath the inguinal ligament. A 62-year-old patient suffering of idiopathic meralgia paresthetica for the past 18 months received a Da Vinci robot-assisted minimally-invasive 10cm long neurolysis, of which 1/3 was situated above the level of the inguinal ligament and 2/3 below it...
May 18, 2016: Annales de Chirurgie Plastique et Esthétique
Amgad Hanna
OBJECTIVE Meralgia paresthetica causes dysesthesias and burning in the anterolateral thigh. Surgical treatment includes nerve transection or decompression. Finding the nerve in surgery is very challenging. The author conducted a cadaveric study to better understand the variations in the anatomy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). METHODS Twenty embalmed cadavers were used for this study. The author studied the LFCN's relationship to different fascial planes, and the distance from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS)...
April 22, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery
Jae Jun Lee, Jong Hee Sohn, Hyuk Jai Choi, Jin Seo Yang, Kwang Ho Lee, Hye Jin Do, Sung Ho Lee, Yong Jun Cho
BACKGROUND: Meralgia paresthetica (MP) is a neurologic disorder of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN), which is characterized by a localized area of paresthesia and numbness on the anterolateral aspect of the thigh. In most patients with MP, symptoms can be successfully managed with conservative treatment. However, in a small group of MP patients who are refractory to medical treatment, more aggressive low-risk treatment should be considered. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) neuromodulation of the LFCN in MP patients refractory to conservative treatment...
March 2016: Pain Physician
Arada Wongmek, Susan Shin, Lan Zhou
INTRODUCTION: Meralgia paresthetica is a focal neuropathy caused by compression of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN). The disease can be difficult to assess by neurophysiological or imaging studies. METHODS: We studied 5 patients who presented to our neuromuscular clinic from April 2012 to December 2014 with a clinical suspicion of meralgia paresthetica and had skin biopsies with intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) evaluation. RESULTS: The mean age at onset was 37...
April 2016: Muscle & Nerve
Nora K Shumway, Emily Cole, Kristen Heins Fernandez
Dysesthesia is a generic term for a cutaneous symptom--such as pruritus, burning, tingling, stinging, anesthesia, hypoesthesia, tickling, crawling, cold sensation, or even pain--without a primary cutaneous condition in a well-defined location that is often caused by nerve trauma, impingement, or irritation. There are multiple types of dysesthesias depending on the body location and the nerves involved. While location, exact symptoms, and etiologies might vary, the underlying theme is that these conditions are of neurologic origin and have dermatologic consequences...
February 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Serdar Taşdemir, Ümit Hıdır Ulaş, Mehmet Yücel, Ahmet Çetiz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Acta Neurologica Belgica
Clément Derkenne, Antoine Lamblin, Xavier Demaison, Adrien Darléguy
The wearing of individual protective elements has revolutionized the typology of war wounds. The benefit/risk ratio is particularly satisfying, but several side effects with minor consequences are described, calling for further ergonomic development from manufacturers of these protective elements. This case report describes a meralgia paresthetica by compression of the lateral cutaneous thigh nerve because of the wearing of bulletproof vest. A symptomatic treatment was introduced, and 2 months after the apparition of the symptoms, the patient's condition has improved, with only a slight hypoesthesia remaining...
December 2015: Military Medicine
Armando Gavazzi, Francesca de Rino, Maria Claudia Boveri, Anna Picozzi, Massimo Franceschi
We evaluated 374 consecutive patients from May 2013 to April 2014 who underwent major cardiac surgery. Each patient had an interview and a neurological clinical examination during the rehabilitation period. Patients with possible peripheral nervous system (PNS) complications underwent further electrodiagnostic tests. Among 374 patients undergoing major heart surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting, valvular heart surgery, ascending aortic aneurysm repair) 23 (6.1 %) developed 34 new PNS complications. We found four brachial plexopathies; four carpal tunnel syndromes; five critical illness neuropathies; three worsening of pre-existing neuropathies; two involvement of X, one of IX and one of XII cranial nerves; three peroneal (at knee), one saphenous, two median (at Struthers ligament), six ulnar (at elbow) mononeuropathies; two meralgia parestheticas...
February 2016: Neurological Sciences
Parthasarthi Ramakrishnan, Saurabh Bansal, Biswajit Deuri, Rajapandian Subbiah, Senthilnathan Palanisamy, Praveen Raj Palanivelu, Palanivelu Chinusamy
BACKGROUND: Management of complications of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair remains challenging as well as debatable. Relaparoscopy in management of these complications is relatively newer concept. We tried to analyse the feasibility of relaparoscopy (transabdominal preperitoneal approach) in management of complications of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study group included 61 patients (referral cases) from a prospectively maintained database of previous laparoscopic inguinal hernia surgery with majority of the patients of recurrence (n = 39)...
June 2016: Surgical Endoscopy
Godard C W de Ruiter, Johannes A L Wurzer, Alfred Kloet
Recurrence of meralgia paresthetica after a pain-free interval following a neurexeresis or neurectomy procedure has not been reported before. We present a case of recurrence 5 years after neurexeresis of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Resection of the proximal stump through a suprainguinal approach in this case again led to complete and long-lasting pain relief.
December 2015: British Journal of Neurosurgery
Godard C W de Ruiter, Alfred Kloet
INTRODUCTION: Various surgical procedures can be applied in the treatment of meralgia paresthetica. The two main ones are neurolysis and neurectomy of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. To date, no prospective or randomized controlled trial has compared the effectiveness of these procedures with standardized outcome measures. In this study we present our results for two prospectively followed cohorts and we present the protocol for a double blind randomized controlled trial (RCT). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: All patients that had an indication for surgical treatment of idiopathic meralgia paresthetica between August 2012 and April 2014 were included in the study...
July 2015: Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
H J Shin, Y H Kim, H W Lee
Meralgia paresthetica (MP) is generally caused by entrapment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve (LFCN), and presents with pain and paresthesia in the anterolateral thigh. This paper describes a patient who had MP-like symptoms as a result of continuous epidural analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. The patient with pre-existing left foraminal stenosis at L3-L4 and disc herniations at L4-5 did not complain of paresthesia or pain during the combined spinal-epidural anesthetic procedure. However, during epidural analgesia on the second post-operative day, he complained of paresthesia and pain in the anterolateral thigh of the contralateral leg...
November 2014: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Miho Nishimura, Yuichi Kodama, Reiji Fukano, Jun Okamura, Kippei Ogaki, Yoshihisa Sakaguchi, Masahiro Migita, Jiro Inagaki
A 7-year-old girl with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed recurrent fever and meralgia paresthetica (MP) during chemotherapy, which resolved after administration of antibiotics. Five months after the onset of these symptoms, enhanced computed tomography showed a periappendiceal abscess extending into the psoas muscle. The cause of her fever and MP was thought to be appendicitis, which probably developed during induction chemotherapy but did not result in typical abdominal pain...
April 2015: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/oncology
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