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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28647502/alternative-complement-pathway-hemolytic-assays-reveal-incomplete-complement-blockade-in-patients-treated-with-eculizumab
#1
Bénédicte Puissant-Lubrano, Sylvain Puissochet, Nicolas Congy-Jolivet, Dominique Chauveau, Stéphane Decramer, Arnaud Garnier, Antoine Huart, Nassim Kamar, David Ribes, Antoine Blancher
Eculizumab is a monoclonal anti-C5 antibody used in the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). We monitored complement inhibition in 16 eculizumab-treated patients suffering from HUS or transplant rejection (not aHUS patients). Blood samples were obtained one to four weeks after the last eculizumab injection. We observed that eculizumab efficiently blocked the terminal pathway (TP) through classical pathway (CP) activation measured by kinetic hemolytic assay (HA) (<10%) but incompletely blocked the TP through alternative pathway (AP) activation measured by rabbit (APH50>23%) or chicken erythrocytes HA (AP100>15%)...
June 21, 2017: Clinical Immunology: the Official Journal of the Clinical Immunology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28646725/eculizumab-decreases-the-procoagulant-activity-of-extracellular-vesicles-in-paroxysmal-nocturnal-hemoglobinuria-a-pilot-prospective-longitudinal-clinical-study
#2
Adeline Wannez, Bérangère Devalet, Céline Bouvy, Julie Laloy, Benoit Bihin, Bernard Chatelain, Christian Chatelain, Jean-Michel Dogné, François Mullier
INTRODUCTION: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a disease characterized by the susceptibility of blood cells to attack by the complement system, inducing extracellular vesicle (EV) production. Thromboembolism is the leading cause of death in this condition. Eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody which inhibits the C5 protein of the complement, reduces the thrombotic risk in PNH. MATERIALS AND METHOD: We conducted a pilot, prospective, open-label, longitudinal clinical study with six PNH patients treated with eculizumab...
June 9, 2017: Thrombosis Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28638625/early-eculizumab-use-in-atypical-haemolytic-uraemic-syndrome-in-a-jehovah-s-witness-refusing-blood-products
#3
May Al-Shaghana, Andrew Bentall, Mark D Jesky, William Lester, Graham Lipkin
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is characterized by microscopic angiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and organ injury. Supportive therapies include the use of blood products. Recently the terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab has been approved in atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) in some countries. We report the case of a 23-year-old female Jehovah's Witness presenting with vaginal haemorrhage from thrombocytopaenia, severe anaemia (nadir Hb 28 g/L) and anuric acute kidney injury with TMA secondary to aHUS...
June 2017: Oxford Medical Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630122/eculizumab-blocks-vaccine-induced-opsonophagocytic-killing-of-meningococci-by-whole-blood-from-immunized-adults
#4
Monica Konar, Dan M Granoff
Eculizumab, a humanized anti-complement C5 monoclonal antibody for treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, blocks the terminal complement pathway required for serum bactericidal activity (SBA). Because treated patients are at >1000-fold increased risk of meningococcal disease, vaccination is recommended, but whether vaccination can protect by opsonophagocytic activity in the absence of SBA is not known. Meningococci were added to anticoagulated blood from 12 healthy adults vaccinated with meningococcal serogroup B and serogroup A,C,W,Y vaccines...
June 19, 2017: Blood
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28629435/eculizumab-treatment-stochastic-occurrence-of-c3-binding-to-individual-pnh-erythrocytes
#5
Michela Sica, Tommaso Rondelli, Patrizia Ricci, Maria De Angioletti, Antonio M Risitano, Rosario Notaro
BACKGROUND: C5 blockade by eculizumab prevents complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). However, C3-bound PNH red blood cells (RBCs), arising in almost all treated patients, may undergo extravascular hemolysis reducing clinical benefits. Despite the uniform deficiency of CD55 and of CD59, there are always two distinct populations of PNH RBCs, with (C3+) and without (C3-) C3 binding. METHODS: To investigate this paradox, the phenomenon has been modeled in vitro by incubating RBCs from eculizumab untreated PNH patients with compatible sera containing eculizumab, and by assessing the C3 binding after activation of complement alternative pathway...
June 19, 2017: Journal of Hematology & Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628799/a-novel-2-stage-approach-that-detects-complement-activation-in-patients-with-antiphospholipid-antibody-syndrome
#6
Jacob H Rand, Xiao-Xuan Wu, Lucia R Wolgast, Victor Lei, Edward M Conway
INTRODUCTION: The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is marked by autoantibodies that recognize anionic phospholipids in a cofactor-dependent manner. A role for complement has been implicated in the pathophysiology, however, elevations of complement activation markers have not been consistently demonstrated in clinical studies. We therefore designed a proof-of-principle study to determine whether complement activation might be detectable in APS by first exposing plasmas to phospholipid vesicles...
June 9, 2017: Thrombosis Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626544/atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-a-brief-review
#7
REVIEW
Kuixing Zhang, Yuxin Lu, Kevin T Harley, Minh-Ha Tran
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a disease characterized by the triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. The histopathologic lesions of aHUS include thrombotic microangiopathy involving the glomerular capillaries and thrombosis involving arterioles or interlobar arteries. Extra-renal manifestations occur in up to 20% of patients. The majority of aHUS is caused by complement system defects impairing ordinary regulatory mechanisms. Activating events therefore lead to unbridled, ongoing complement activity producing widespread endothelial injury...
June 1, 2017: Hematology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28626543/cerebral-stroke-in-a-teenage-girl-with-paroxysmal-nocturnal-hemoglobinuria
#8
Francesco Gervasi, Lucia D'Amelio, Antonino Trizzino, Fabrizia Ferraro, Delia Russo, Giuseppe Santangelo, Francesca Cardella, Angela Trizzino, Floriana Di Marco, Piero Farruggia
We report a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) in a 14 year-old girl presenting a cerebral arterial thrombosis. The initial diagnosis was carential anemia due to menarche following identification of slight macrocytic anemia, leucopenia and mild thrombocytopenia at routine blood analysis. The child was eventually referred to a children's hospital after the onset of progressive fatigue, anorexia and paleness. Severe anemia (hemoglobin 6 g/dL) with negative Coombs test, mild leucopenia (white blood cells 4...
June 1, 2017: Hematology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622911/demyelination-strokes-and-eculizumab-lessons-from-the-congenital-cd59-gene-mutations
#9
Adi Tabib, Netanel Karbian, Dror Mevorach
Neurological symptoms of patients with p.Cys89Tyr mutation in the CD59 gene include recurrent peripheral neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome, characterized by sensory-motor demyelinating neuropathy with secondary axonal damage and moderate enhancement of the nerve roots on spine MRI, together with recurrent strokes and retinal involvement. Three additional mutations in CD59, leading to loss of function, have been described, and overall, 12/12 (100%) of patients with any mutation presented with neurological symptoms; 11/12 (92%) patients presented with recurrent peripheral neuropathy, 6/12 (50%) with recurrent strokes, and 1/12 (8%) with retinal involvement...
June 13, 2017: Molecular Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28621343/current-evidence-on-the-discontinuation-of-eculizumab-in-patients-with-atypical-haemolytic-uraemic-syndrome
#10
COMMENT
Manuel Macia, Fernando de Alvaro Moreno, Tina Dutt, Ingela Fehrman, Karine Hadaya, Christoph Gasteyger, Nils Heyne
Background. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, life-threatening disorder for which eculizumab is the only approved treatment. Life-long treatment is indicated; however, eculizumab discontinuation has been reported. Methods. Unpublished authors' cases and published cases of eculizumab discontinuation are reviewed. We also report eculizumab discontinuation data from five clinical trials, plus long-term extensions and the global aHUS Registry. Results. Of six unpublished authors' cases, four patients had a subsequent thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) manifestation within 12 months of discontinuation...
June 2017: Clinical Kidney Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616209/should-eculizumab-be-discontinued-in-patients-with-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome
#11
Eva Rodriguez, Clara Barrios, Maria José Soler
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a life-threatening disorder for which prompt diagnosis and eculizumab treatment is indicated. The time for relapse and patients at risk for relapse after eculizumab discontinuation are unknown. While some authors believe there is no clinical evidence supporting eculizumab discontinuation, which may be associated with high collateral risks such as loss of renal function, other authors believe that the drug can be safely discontinued with close patient monitoring. In this editorial, we update the pros and cons for eculizumab discontinuation in aHUS...
June 2017: Clinical Kidney Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28612003/discontinuation-of-peritoneal-dialysis-after-late-initiation-of-eculizumab-in-a-case-of-familial-atypical-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-a-case-report
#12
Rafael Alonso Valente, Giannina Elena García Rodríguez, Yanina García Marcote, Manuel Fidalgo Díaz, Vanesa Becerra Mosquera, Daniel Novoa García, Teresa Cordal Martínez, Cándido Díaz Rodríguez
BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is caused by a thrombotic microangiopathy and manifests itself with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and organ ischemia. Its etiology is a mutation affecting the genes encoding for proteins of the complement system. Early treatment with eculizumab (8.6 months from the moment of presentation), a humanized monoclonal antibody against complement, is shown to be effective in controlling symptoms and reversing organ damage. We present a patient with a mutation not previously described in the literature...
January 2017: Case Reports in Nephrology and Dialysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28610663/eculizumab-c5-complexes-express-a-c5a-neoepitope-in-vivo-consequences-for-interpretation-of-patient-complement-analyses
#13
Per H Nilsson, Anub Mathew Thomas, Grethe Bergseth, Alice Gustavsen, Elena B Volokhina, Lambertus P van den Heuvel, Andreas Barratt-Due, Tom E Mollnes
The complement system has obtained renewed clinical focus due to increasing number of patients treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody inhibiting cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b. The FDA approved indications are paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, but many other diseases are candidates for complement inhibition. It has been postulated that eculizumab does not inhibit C5a formation in vivo, in contrast to what would be expected since it blocks C5 cleavage. We recently revealed that this finding was due to a false positive reaction in a C5a assay...
June 10, 2017: Molecular Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28608499/clinical-benefit-of-eculizumab-in-patients-with-no-transfusion-history-in-the-international-paroxysmal-nocturnal-haemoglobinuria-registry
#14
A M Almeida, C Bedrosian, A Cole, P Muus, H Schrezenmeier, J Szer, W F Rosse
BACKGROUND: Eculizumab reduces intravascular haemolysis and improves disease symptoms in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH). AIMS: To characterize, in a real-world setting, effect of eculizumab in patients with haemolytic PNH (LDH ≥1.5 ULN) and no history of red blood cell transfusion, including those with high disease activity (HDA). METHODS: Three populations from the International PNH Registry were studied: 1) non-transfused, untreated, 2) non-transfused, eculizumab-treated, 3) transfused, eculizumab-treated (≥1 transfusions in 6 months prior to eculizumab initiation)...
June 13, 2017: Internal Medicine Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28599619/a-devastating-case-of-diarrhea-associated-hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-associated-with-extensive-cerebral-infarction-why-we-need-to-do-better
#15
Werner Keenswijk, Evelyn Dhont, Ann Raes, An Bael, Johan Vande Walle
A 4-year-old girl with diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS) was transferred to the PICU of our center due to deteriorating renal function and neurological involvement. On admission, a comatous child was seen with hypoventilation and she was placed on mechanical ventilation. Hemodialysis was commenced but plasma exchange was discontinued due to repeated hypersensitivity reactions. A trial of eculizumab was given in light of the worsening of her neurologic condition with development of a pyramidal syndrome and deepening of the coma...
June 9, 2017: Acta Clinica Belgica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597710/comparing-treatment-options-for-chronic-inflammatory-neuropathies-and-choosing-the-right-treatment-plan
#16
Eduardo Nobile-Orazio, Francesca Gallia, Fabrizia Terenghi, Mariangela Bianco
Chronic inflammatory neuropathies are disorders caused by an immune response to peripheral nerve. They include chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) and neuropathy associated with anti-MAG IgM monoclonal gammopathy and other less frequent neuropathies. Several immune therapies have been proven to be effective in these neuropathies even if the best therapeutic option is still unsettled. Areas covered: The authors reviewed the literature to compare the efficacy and safety of currently used immune therapies in these neuropathies...
June 9, 2017: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28596415/hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-pregnancy-and-postpartum
#17
Alexandra Bruel, David Kavanagh, Marina Noris, Yahsou Delmas, Edwin K S Wong, Elena Bresin, François Provôt, Vicky Brocklebank, Caterina Mele, Giuseppe Remuzzi, Chantal Loirat, Véronique Frémeaux-Bacchi, Fadi Fakhouri
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is associated with various forms of thrombotic microangiopathy, including hemolytic uremic syndrome. A previous small French study suggested that pregnancy-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome was to be included in the spectrum of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome linked to complement alternative pathway dysregulation. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: We sought to retrospectively analyze the presentation, outcome, and frequency of complement alternative pathway gene variants in a larger international (France, United Kingdom, Italy) cohort of patients with pregnancy-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome...
June 8, 2017: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology: CJASN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28579778/iron-oxide-nanoparticles-induce-cytokine-secretion-in-a-complement-dependent-manner-in-a-human-whole-blood-model
#18
Susann Wolf-Grosse, Anne Mari Rokstad, Syed Ali, John D Lambris, Tom E Mollnes, Asbjørn M Nilsen, Jørgen Stenvik
Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are promising nanomaterials for biomedical applications. However, their inflammatory potential has not been fully established. Here, we used a lepirudin anti-coagulated human whole blood model to evaluate the potential of 10 nm IONPs to activate the complement system and induce cytokine production. Reactive oxygen species and cell death were also assessed. The IONPs activated complement, as measured by C3a, C5a and sC5b-9, and induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in a particle-dose dependent manner, with the strongest response at 10 µg/mL IONPs...
2017: International Journal of Nanomedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576714/alginate-microbeads-are-coagulation-compatible-while-alginate-microcapsules-activate-coagulation-secondary-to-complement-or-directly-through-fxii
#19
Caroline Gravastrand, Shamal Hamad, Hilde Fure, Bjørg Steinkjer, Liv Ryan, Josè Oberholzer, John D Lambris, Igor Lacík, Tom Eirik Mollnes, Terje Espevik, Ole-Lars Brekke, Anne Mari Rokstad
Alginate microspheres are presently under evaluation for future cell-based therapy. Their ability to induce harmful host reactions needs to be identified for developing the most suitable devices and efficient prevention strategies. We used a lepirudin based human whole blood model to investigate the coagulation potentials of alginate-based microspheres: alginate microbeads (Ca/Ba Beads), alginate poly-l-lysine microcapsules (APA and AP microcapsules) and sodium alginate-sodium cellulose sulfate-poly(methylene-co-cyanoguanidine) microcapsules (PMCG microcapsules)...
May 30, 2017: Acta Biomaterialia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28576324/new-concepts-on-the-therapeutic-control-of-complement-anaphylatoxin-receptors
#20
Owen A Hawksworth, Xaria X Li, Liam G Coulthard, Ernst J Wolvetang, Trent M Woodruff
The complement system is a pivotal driver of innate immunity, coordinating the host response to protect against pathogens. At the heart of the complement response lie the active fragments, C3a and C5a, acting through their specific receptors, C3aR, C5aR1, and C5aR2, to direct the cellular response to inflammation. Their potent function however, places them at risk of damaging the host, with aberrant C3a and C5a signaling activity linked to a wide range of disorders of inflammatory, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative etiologies...
May 30, 2017: Molecular Immunology
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