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Metabolism and epigenetic

Anna Chung-Kwan Tse, Jing-Woei Li, Simon Yuan Wang, Ting-Fung Chan, Keng Po Lai, Rudolf Shiu-Sun Wu
Hypoxia is a global environmental concern and poses a significant threat to aquatic ecosystems, including the sustainability of natural fish populations. The deleterious effects of hypoxia on fish reproductive fitness, as mediated by disruption of sex hormones and gene expression along the Brain-Pituitary-Gonad axis, have been well documented. Recently, we further demonstrated that the observed disruption of steroidogenesis in the ovary of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma is mediated through microRNAs (miRNAs)...
October 8, 2016: Aquatic Toxicology
Aindrila Chatterjee, Janine Seyfferth, Jacopo Lucci, Ralf Gilsbach, Sebastian Preissl, Lena Böttinger, Christoph U Mårtensson, Amol Panhale, Thomas Stehle, Oliver Kretz, Abdullah H Sahyoun, Sergiy Avilov, Stefan Eimer, Lutz Hein, Nikolaus Pfanner, Thomas Becker, Asifa Akhtar
A functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulators and metabolic control could provide a mechanism to adapt cellular responses to environmental cues. We report that the well-known nuclear MYST family acetyl transferase MOF and a subset of its non-specific lethal complex partners reside in mitochondria. MOF regulates oxidative phosphorylation by controlling expression of respiratory genes from both nuclear and mtDNA in aerobically respiring cells. MOF binds mtDNA, and this binding is dependent on KANSL3. The mitochondrial pool of MOF, but not a catalytically deficient mutant, rescues respiratory and mtDNA transcriptional defects triggered by the absence of MOF...
October 20, 2016: Cell
Nina Holland
Environmental research and public health in the 21st century face serious challenges such as increased air pollution and global warming, widespread use of potentially harmful chemicals including pesticides, plasticizers, and other endocrine disruptors, and radical changes in nutrition and lifestyle typical of modern societies. In particular, exposure to environmental and occupational toxicants may contribute to the occurrence of adverse birth outcomes, neurodevelopmental deficits, and increased risk of cancer and other multifactorial diseases such as diabetes and asthma...
October 21, 2016: Reviews on Environmental Health
Denise Laskowski, Ylva Sjunnesson, Hans Gustafsson, Patrice Humblot, Göran Andersson, Renée Båge
BACKGROUND: Insulin has been used as a stimulatory factor for in vitro cell culture since many years. Even for routine in vitro embryo production (IVP), insulin is added to the media during different steps. There is a strong difference in concentrations used in vitro compared to what is measured in vivo in follicular fluid or serum. We performed a pilot study on insulin stability to explain possible reasons for that variation. RESULTS: We measured insulin concentrations before and after bovine oocyte maturation in an experiment by using a quantitative ELISA (Mercodia bovine insulin ELISA immunoassay) and found that concentrations were stable up to 22 h of incubation...
October 20, 2016: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
Yong Zhang, Bing Yu, Jun He, Daiwen Chen
Skeletal muscle is a remarkably complicated organ comprising many different cell types, and it plays an important role in lifelong metabolic health. Nutrients, as an external regulator, potently regulate skeletal muscle development through various internal regulatory factors, such as mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and microRNAs (miRNAs). As a nutrient sensor, mTOR, integrates nutrient availability to regulate myogenesis and directly or indirectly influences microRNA expression. MiRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs mediating gene silencing, are implicated in myogenesis and muscle-related diseases...
2016: International Journal of Biological Sciences
Caitlin G Howe, Xinhua Liu, Megan N Hall, Vesna Ilievski, Marie A Caudill, Olga Malysheva, Angela M Lomax-Luu, Faruque Parvez, Abu B Siddique, Hasan Shahriar, Mohammad N Uddin, Tariqul Islam, Joseph H Graziano, Max Costa, Mary V Gamble
BACKGROUND: Posttranslational histone modifications (PTHMs) are altered by arsenic, an environmental carcinogen. PTHMs are also influenced by nutritional methyl donors involved in one-carbon metabolism (OCM), which may protect against epigenetic dysregulation. METHODS: We measured global levels of three PTHMs, which are dysregulated in cancers (H3K36me2, H3K36me3, H3K79me2), in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 324 participants enrolled in the Folic Acid and Creatine Trial, a randomized trial in arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi adults...
October 20, 2016: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Siroon Bekkering, Inge van den Munckhof, Tim Nielen, Evert Lamfers, Charles Dinarello, Joost Rutten, Jacqueline de Graaf, Leo A B Joosten, Mihai G Netea, Marc E R Gomes, Niels P Riksen
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We have recently reported that monocytes can undergo functional and transcriptional reprogramming towards a long-term pro-inflammatory phenotype after brief in vitro exposure to atherogenic stimuli such as oxidized LDL. This process is termed 'trained immunity', and is mediated by epigenetic remodeling and a metabolic switch towards increased aerobic glycolysis. We hypothesize that trained immunity contributes to atherogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the inflammatory phenotype and epigenetic remodeling of monocytes from patients with and without established atherosclerosis...
October 12, 2016: Atherosclerosis
Rüdiger Hardeland
Dynamic aspects of melatonin's actions merit increasing future attention. This concerns particularly entirely different effects in senescent, weakened oscillators and in dysregulated oscillators of cancer cells that may be epigenetically blocked. This is especially obvious in the case of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) which is upregulated by melatonin in aged tissues, but strongly downregulated in several cancer cells. These findings are not at all controversial, but are explained on the basis of divergent changes in weakened and dysregulated oscillators...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Pineal Research
Angad P Mehta, Han Li, Sean A Reed, Lubica Supekova, Tsotne Javahishvili, Peter G Schultz
Several modified bases have been observed in the genomic DNA of bacteriophages, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes that play a role in restriction systems and/or epigenetic regulation. In our efforts to understand the consequences of replacing a large fraction of a canonical nucleoside with a modified nucleoside, we previously replaced around 75% of thymidine (T) with 5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5hmU) in the Escherichia coli genome. In this study, we engineered the pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway using T4 bacteriophage genes to achieve approximately 63% replacement of 2'-deoxycytidine (dC) with 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5hmC) in the E...
October 20, 2016: Journal of the American Chemical Society
Camila Ferreira Leite, Simony Lira do Nascimento, Fernanda Rodrigues Helmo, Maria Luíza Gonçalves Dos Reis Monteiro, Marlene Antônia Dos Reis, Rosana Rosa Miranda Corrêa
PURPOSE: To explore information available in the literature about the possible benefits resulting from physical activity (PA) in non-risky pregnant women, repercussion on maternal organism, fetal development, and on long-term offspring health. METHODS: Critical narrative review using online databases. RESULTS: Through critical discussion of studies focused on PA practiced during pregnancy, it was observed that some of the outcomes investigated on both mother and offspring showed conflicting findings...
October 19, 2016: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Yongchang Zheng, Qianqian Huang, Zijian Ding, Tingting Liu, Chenghai Xue, Xinting Sang, Jin Gu
The alteration of DNA methylation landscape is a key epigenetic event in cancer. As the accumulation of large-scale genome-wide DNA methylation data from clinical samples, we are able to characterize the patterns of DNA methylation alterations for identifying candidate epigenetic markers and drivers. In this survey, we take hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as an example to show the basic steps of analyzing the DNA methylation patterns in cancer across multiple data sets. We collected three genome-wide DNA methylation data sets with ∼800 clinical samples and the corresponding gene expression data sets...
October 19, 2016: Briefings in Bioinformatics
Szu Yuan Li, Katalin Susztak
An increasing amount of evidence suggests that metabolic alterations play a key role in chronic kidney disease (CKD) pathogenesis. In this issue of the JCI, Long et al. report that the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) taurine-upregulated 1 (Tug1) contributes to CKD development. The authors show that Tug1 regulates mitochondrial function in podocytes by epigenetic targeting of expression of the transcription factor PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, encoded by Ppargc1a). Transgenic overexpression of Tug1 specifically in podocytes ameliorated diabetes-induced CKD in mice...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Martino Deidda, Rosalinda Madonna, Ruggiero Mango, Pasquale Pagliaro, Pier P Bassareo, Lucia Cugusi, Silvio Romano, Maria Penco, Francesco Romeo, Giuseppe Mercuro
Despite advances in supportive and protective therapy for myocardial function, heart failure caused by various clinical conditions, including cardiomyopathy due to antineoplastic therapy, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Because of the limitations associated with current therapies, investigators have been searching for alternative treatments that can effectively repair the damaged heart and permanently restore its function. Damage to the heart can result from both traditional chemotherapeutic agents, such as anthracyclines, and new targeted therapies, such as trastuzumab...
May 2016: Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine
Patricio Lopez-Jaramillo
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are major causes of death and illness worldwide. In recent decades an increased prevalence of CVD mortality has been reported in low-medium income countries, which has been associated with changes in life styles, deficiencies in health systems and the persistence of social inequities.The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, with insulin resistance and increased adiposity as its central features. Identifying individuals with metabolic syndrome is important due to its association with an increased risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Maureen O'Sullivan
Since its foundation by remarkably talented and insightful individuals, prominently including Pepper Dehner, pediatric soft tissue tumor pathology has developed at an immense rate. The morphologic classification of tumoral entities has extensively been corroborated, but has also evolved with refinement or realignment of these classifications, through accruing molecular data, with many derivative ancillary diagnostic assays now already well-established. Tumors of unclear histogenesis, classically morphologically undifferentiated, are prominent amongst pediatric sarcomas, however, the classes of undifferentiated round- or spindle-cell-tumors-not-otherwise-specified are being dismantled gradually with the identification of their molecular underpinnings...
September 5, 2016: Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology
Jing-Ran Ma, Dan-Hua Wang
Breastfeeding is well-known for its benefits of preventing communicable and non-communicable diseases. Human breastmilk consists not only of nutrients, but also of bioactive substances. What's more, the epigenetic effects of human breast milk may also play an important role. Alterations in the epigenetic regulation of genes may lead to profound changes in phenotype. Clarifying the role of human breast milk on genetic expression can potentially benefit the infant's health and his later life. This review article makes a brief summary of the epigenetic mechanism of breast milk, and its epigenetic effects on neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, infectious diseases, metabolism syndrome, cognitive function and anaphylactic diseases...
October 2016: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
A Cacace, M Sboarina, T Vazeille, P Sonveaux
Cancer cells can use a variety of metabolic substrates to fulfill the bioenergetic and biosynthetic needs of their oncogenic program. Besides bioenergetics, cancer cell metabolism also directly influences genetic, epigenetic and signaling events associated with tumor progression. Many cancer cells are addicted to glutamine, and this addiction is observed in oxidative as well as in glycolytic cells. Although both oxidative and bioreductive glutamine metabolism can contribute to cancer progression and glutamine can further serve to generate peptides (including glutathione) and proteins, we report that glutamine promotes the proliferation of cancer cells independently of its use as a metabolic fuel or as a precursor of glutathione...
October 17, 2016: Oncogene
Yves J R Menezo, Erica Silvestris, Brian Dale, Kay Elder
The negative effect of oxidative stress on the human reproductive process is no longer a matter for debate. Oxidative stress affects female and male gametes and the developmental capacity of embryos. Its effect can continue through late stages of pregnancy. Metabolic disorders and psychiatric problems can also be caued by DNA methylation and epigenetic errors. Age has a negative effect on oxidative stress and DNA methylation, and recent observations suggest that older men are at risk of transmitting epigenetic disorders to their offspring...
September 27, 2016: Reproductive Biomedicine Online
Helena C Cesar, Luciana Pellegrini Pisani
A high-fat diet is the main environmental cue that has been studied in the hypothalamus since the discovery of its connection with hypothalamic inflammation. Current evidence shows hypothalamic inflammation as a likely mechanism for the dysregulation on the homeostatic control of energy balance, which leads to metabolic alterations and obesity. Although this mechanism seems to be reversible when set during adulthood, we argue whether dietary fatty acids, during critical periods of development, could affect hypothalamic function permanently and set an increased susceptibility to obesity...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
L Dioni, S Sucato, V Motta, S Iodice, L Angelici, C Favero, T Cavalleri, L Vigna, B Albetti, S Fustinoni, P Bertazzi, A Pesatori, V Bollati
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Epidemiological studies suggest a link between chromium (Cr) status and cardiovascular disease. Increased urinary excretion of Cr was reported in subjects with diabetes compared with non-diabetic controls and those with non-diabetic insulin resistance. Epigenetic alterations have been linked to the presence of Cr, and microRNA (miRNA) expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). We investigated the association between Cr excretion and miRNA expression in leukocytes from obese subjects...
October 12, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
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