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parkinsonism medication

Rodolfo Savica, Brandon R Grossardt, James H Bower, J Eric Ahlskog, Michelle M Mielke, Walter A Rocca
BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies of drug-induced parkinsonism remain limited. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence and time trends of drug-induced parkinsonism over 30 years in a geographically defined American population. METHODS: We used the medical records-linkage system of the Rochester Epidemiology Project to identify all persons in Olmsted County, Minnesota, who received a screening diagnostic code for parkinsonism from 1976 through 2005...
October 25, 2016: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
Christopher F Tirotta, Tuan Nguyen, Steven Fishberger, Evelio Velis, Melissa Olen, Lourdes Lam, Danielle R Madril, Jessica Hughes, Richard G Lagueruela
BACKGROUND: Dexmedetomidine is a selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist with sedative, analgesic, and anxiolytic properties. Dexmedetomidine has not been approved for use in pediatrics. Dexmedetomidine has been reported to depress sinus node and atrioventricular nodal function in pediatric patients; it has been suggested that the use of dexmedetomidine may not be desirable during electrophysiological studies. AIM: We hypothesize that the use of dexmedetomidine does not inhibit the induction of supraventricular tachyarrhythmias (SVT) during electrophysiological studies and does not inhibit the ablation of such arrhythmias...
October 25, 2016: Paediatric Anaesthesia
Christine Petschow, Lukas Scheef, Sebastian Paus, Nadine Zimmermann, Hans H Schild, Thomas Klockgether, Henning Boecker
BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVE: Pain is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease. As dopaminergic dysfunction is suggested to affect intrinsic nociceptive processing, this study was designed to characterize laser-induced pain processing in early-stage Parkinson's disease patients in the dopaminergic OFF state, using a multimodal experimental approach at behavioral, autonomic, imaging levels. METHODS: 13 right-handed early-stage Parkinson's disease patients without cognitive or sensory impairment were investigated OFF medication, along with 13 age-matched healthy control subjects...
2016: PloS One
Douglas Powell, Anburaj Muthumani, RuiPing Xia
OBJECTIVE: Quantify the effect of a continuous compared to discontinuous movement trajectory on parkinsonian rigidity and reflex responses to passive stretch and shortening. METHODS: Eighteen participants with Parkinson's disease (PD) performed passive wrist flexion and extension movements through a 90° range of motion at 50 °/sec using continuous (CONT) and discontinuous (DISC) movement trajectories. Participants were tested in both the OFF-MED and ON-MED states...
2016: Journal of Nature and Science
David Okai, Sally Askey-Jones, Joel Mack, Anne Martin, Kallol Ray Chaudhuri, Michael Samuel, Anthony S David, Richard G Brown
BACKGROUND: Impulse-control behaviors (ICBs) are increasingly recognized in Parkinson's disease (PD) as drug-related effects of dopaminergic mediation that occur in 15% to 35% of patients with PD. The authors describe the design and evaluation of a new, clinician-rated severity scale for the assessment of syndromal and subsyndromal forms of impulse-control disorders (ICDs), simple (punding) and complex (hobbyism) repetitive behaviors, and compulsive overuse of medication (dopamine dysregulation syndrome)...
September 2016: Movement Disorders Clinical Practice
A-S Kleib, E Sid'Ahmed, S-M Salihy, N Boukhrissi, M Diagana, O Soumaré
We describe the case of a 41 year-old woman who presented with a slight slowness of the right hand movement, which began four months prior to admission. Neurological examination showed slight rest tremor of the right hand, moderate bradykinesia and rigidity. She had been taking medication for Parkinson's disease, but without any benefit. The patient underwent a gadolinium-enhanced brain MRI, which showed a large left sphenoid wing meningioma with surrounding edema compressing the basal ganglia. Total excision of tumor was performed...
October 19, 2016: Neuro-Chirurgie
Walter Pirker, Regina Katzenschlager
Human gait depends on a complex interplay of major parts of the nervous, musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems. The individual gait pattern is influenced by age, personality, mood and sociocultural factors. The preferred walking speed in older adults is a sensitive marker of general health and survival. Safe walking requires intact cognition and executive control. Gait disorders lead to a loss of personal freedom, falls and injuries and result in a marked reduction in the quality of life. Acute onset of a gait disorder may indicate a cerebrovascular or other acute lesion in the nervous system but also systemic diseases or adverse effects of medication, in particular polypharmacy including sedatives...
October 21, 2016: Wiener Klinische Wochenschrift
C Schlenstedt, A Shalash, M Muthuraman, D Falk, K Witt, G Deuschl
The aim of this meta-analysis was to summarize the short- and long-term effects of bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) on gait and freezing of gait (FOG) in Parkinson's disease and to detect predictors of post-stimulation outcome. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted up to October 2015 using Medline Ovid databases for studies analyzing the effect of bilateral STN-DBS on FOG and/or gait. Sixteen studies with available data for the gait item (no. 29) of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and six studies with the FOG item (no...
October 20, 2016: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Eric N Beck, Quincy J Almeida
BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD) impairs control of well-learned movements. Movement control improvements are found when individuals complete tasks while focusing attention externally on manipulating an object, which is argued to occur due to automatic processing associated with well-learned movements. Focusing attention internally (on movements of ones' limbs) is believed to involve conscious control networks, and hinders movement performance. Previous work has found that an external focus of attention improved postural stability in individuals with PD (compared to internal), but this was when patients were taking dopamine medication, which modulates basal ganglia functioning responsible for well-learned movements...
October 6, 2016: Physical Therapy
Matteo Bologna, Anna Latorre, Francesca Di Biasio, Antonella Conte, Daniele Belvisi, Nicola Modugno, Antonio Suppa, Alfredo Berardelli, Giovanni Fabbrini
BACKGROUND: By providing a stable and smooth L-dopa plasmatic level, L-dopa/carbidopa intestinal gel reproduces the physiological continuous dopaminergic receptor stimulation in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and it therefore represents a suitable tool to investigate the role of the altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pathophysiology of motor and sensory abnormalities in this condition. METHODS: We studied 11 patients with advanced PD being treated with L-Dopa/carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) and 11 age-matched healthy subjects...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Neuropharmacology
Maximilian D Hien, Fernando Benito Castro, Philippe Fournier, Anne Filleron, Tu-Anh Tran
OBJECTIVES: We report on a rare but severe complication of adenosine use in a child with reentry tachycardia. METHODS AND RESULTS: Treatment with adenosine, which is the standard medical therapy of atrioventricular reentry tachycardia, led to the development of an irregular wide complex tachycardia, caused by rapid ventricular response to atrial fibrillation. The girl was finally stabilized with electrical cardioversion. We analyze the pathomechanism and discuss possible treatment options...
October 8, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Alberto Ascherio, Michael A Schwarzschild
Since 2006, several longitudinal studies have assessed environmental or behavioural factors that seem to modify the risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Increased risk of Parkinson's disease has been associated with exposure to pesticides, consumption of dairy products, history of melanoma, and traumatic brain injury, whereas a reduced risk has been reported in association with smoking, caffeine consumption, higher serum urate concentrations, physical activity, and use of ibuprofen and other common medications...
November 2016: Lancet Neurology
David Mathar, Leonora Wilkinson, Anna K Holl, Jane Neumann, Lorenz Deserno, Arno Villringer, Marjan Jahanshahi, Annette Horstmann
Incidental learning of appropriate stimulus-response associations is crucial for optimal functioning within our complex environment. Positive and negative prediction errors (PEs) serve as neural teaching signals within distinct ('direct'/'indirect') dopaminergic pathways to update associations and optimize subsequent behavior. Using a computational reinforcement learning model, we assessed learning from positive and negative PEs on a probabilistic task (Weather Prediction Task - WPT) in three populations that allow different inferences on the role of dopamine (DA) signals: (1) Healthy volunteers that repeatedly underwent [(11)C]raclopride Positron Emission Tomography (PET), allowing for assessment of striatal DA release during learning, (2) Parkinson's disease (PD) patients tested both on and off L-DOPA medication, (3) early Huntington's disease (HD) patients, a disease that is associated with hyper-activation of the 'direct' pathway...
September 19, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Jacob Taylor, William S Anderson, Jason Brandt, Zoltan Mari, Gregory M Pontone
Although Parkinson disease (PD) is defined clinically by its motor symptoms, it is increasingly recognized that much of the disability and worsened quality of life experienced by patients with PD is attributable to psychiatric symptoms. The authors describe a model of multidisciplinary care that enables these symptoms to be effectively managed. They describe neuropsychiatric complications of PD itself and pharmacologic and neurostimulation treatments for parkinsonian motor symptoms and discuss the management of these complications...
September 3, 2016: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Isabelle Beaulieu-Boire, Camila C Aquino, Alfonso Fasano, Yu-Yan Poon, Melanie Fallis, Antony E Lang, Mojgan Hodaie, Suneil K Kalia, Andres Lozano, Elena Moro
BACKGROUND: Rare causes of inherited movement disorders often present with a debilitating phenotype of dystonia, sometimes combined with parkinsonism and other neurological signs. Since these disorders are often resistant to medications, DBS may be considered as a possible treatment. METHODS: Patients with identified genetic diseases (ataxia-telangiectasia, chorea-achantocytosis, dopa-responsive dystonia, congenital nemaline myopathy, methylmalonic aciduria, neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, spinocerebellar ataxia types 2 and 3, Wilson's disease, Woodhouse-Sakati syndrome, methylmalonic aciduria, and X trisomy) and disabling dystonia underwent bilateral GPi DBS (bilateral thalamic Vim nucleus in 1 case)...
October 4, 2016: Brain Stimulation
Mingming Zhao, Caiyou Hu, Zhixin Wu, Yu Chen, Zhengming Li, Mingsheng Zhang
PURPOSE: To determine the effects of a new exercise training regimen, i.e. coordination and manipulation therapy (CMT), on motor, balance, and cardiac functions in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We divided 36 PD patients into the CMT (n = 22) and control (n = 14) groups. The patients in the CMT group performed dry-land swimming (imitation of the breaststroke) and paraspinal muscle stretching for 30 min/workday for 1 year. The control subjects did not exercise regularly...
October 14, 2016: International Journal of Neuroscience
Adam M Nagy, Christopher M Tolleson
Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a unique, functional neurosurgical therapy indicated for medication refractory movement disorders as well as some psychiatric diseases. Multicontact electrodes are placed in "deep" structures within the brain with targets varying depending on the surgical indication. An implanted programmable pulse generator supplies the electrodes with a chronic, high frequency electrical current that clinically mimics the effects of ablative lesioning techniques. DBS's efficacy has been well established for its movement disorder indications (Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia)...
October 8, 2016: Brain Sciences
Kai-Cheng Hsu, Feng-Sheng Wang
Model-based optimization approaches are valuable in developing new drugs for human metabolic disorders. The core objective in most optimal drug designs is positive therapeutic effects. In this study, we considered the effects of therapeutic, adverse, and target variation simultaneously. A fuzzy optimization method was applied to formulate a multiobjective drug design problem for detecting enzyme targets in the presynaptic dopamine metabolic network to remedy two types of enzymopathies caused by deficiencies of vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)...
2016: PloS One
A A Timofeeva, I I Belozertseva
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disease that restricts activities of daily living. The prevalence of PD and inevitable disability show the importance of medical/social expertise (MSE) in the system of care for PD patients. Currently, the MSE is based on the Hoehn and Yahr scale that indicates the prevalence of disease but does not evaluate the severity of symptoms. To assess restrictions of activities of daily living, one should consider non-motor symptoms of PD, movement fluctuations and dyskinesia, the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological treatment, the use of invasive treatment methods (deep brain stimulation, intrajejunal introduction of duodopa)...
2016: Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova
Joohi Jimenez-Shahed, Ilknur Telkes, Ashwin Viswanathan, Nuri F Ince
Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging treatment strategy for severe, medication-refractory Tourette syndrome (TS). Thalamic (Cm-Pf) and pallidal (including globus pallidus interna, GPi) targets have been the most investigated. While the neurophysiological correlates of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are increasingly recognized, these patterns are not well characterized in other disease states. Recent findings indicate that the cross-frequency coupling (CFC) between beta band and high frequency oscillations (HFOs) within the STN in PD patients is pathologic...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
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