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parkinsonism medication

Adam J Stark, Christopher T Smith, Kalen J Petersen, Paula Trujillo, Nelleke C van Wouwe, Manus J Donahue, Robert M Kessler, Ariel Y Deutch, David H Zald, Daniel O Claassen
Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by widespread degeneration of monoaminergic (especially dopaminergic) networks, manifesting with a number of both motor and non-motor symptoms. Regional alterations to dopamine D2/3 receptors in PD patients are documented in striatal and some extrastriatal areas, and medications that target D2/3 receptors can improve motor and non-motor symptoms. However, data regarding the combined pattern of D2/3 receptor binding in both striatal and extrastriatal regions in PD are limited...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
Samuel Carbunaru, Robert S Eisinger, Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Dana Bassan, Amin Cervantes-Arriaga, Mayela Rodriguez-Violante, Daniel Martinez-Ramirez
Objectives: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are common among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Risk factors identified for developing ICDs include young age, family history, and impulsive personality traits. However, the association of these potentially disabling disorders with nondopaminergic drugs and sleep disorders has been understudied. Our objective was to examine the association between ICDs and nondopaminergic medications and sleep disorders. Methods: We conducted an observational study of 53 patients with PD from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery...
March 2018: Brain and Behavior
Jiayue Cai, Soojin Lee, Fang Ba, Saurabh Garg, Laura J Kim, Aiping Liu, Diana Kim, Z Jane Wang, Martin J McKeown
Falls and balance difficulties remain a major source of morbidity in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and are stubbornly resistant to therapeutic interventions. The mechanisms of gait impairment in PD are incompletely understood but may involve changes in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus (PPN) and its associated connections. We utilized fMRI to explore the modulation of PPN connectivity by Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation (GVS) in healthy controls ( n = 12) and PD subjects even without overt evidence of Freezing of Gait (FOG) while on medication ( n = 23)...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Anand Rughani, Jason M Schwalb, Christos Sidiropoulos, Julie Pilitsis, Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Jennifer A Sweet, Sandeep Mittal, Alberto J Espay, Jorge Gonzalez Martinez, Aviva Abosch, Emad Eskandar, Robert Gross, Ron Alterman, Clement Hamani
QUESTION 1: Is bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) more, less, or as effective as bilateral globus pallidus internus deep brain stimulation (GPi DBS) in treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, as measured by improvements in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale, part III (UPDRS-III) scores? RECOMMENDATION: Given that bilateral STN DBS is at least as effective as bilateral GPi DBS in treating motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (as measured by improvements in UPDRS-III scores), consideration can be given to the selection of either target in patients undergoing surgery to treat motor symptoms...
March 12, 2018: Neurosurgery
René Günther, Wiebke Schrempf, Antje Hähner, Thomas Hummel, Martin Wolz, Alexander Storch, Andreas Hermann
Background: Nonmotor symptoms are very common in neurodegenerative diseases. In patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), olfactory dysfunction was first reported more than 20 years ago; however, its pathophysiological correlates and further implications remain elusive. Methods: In this so far largest case-control study, we analyzed olfactory performance with the "Sniffin' Sticks," a validated olfactory testing kit used in clinical routine...
2018: Frontiers in Neurology
Izabela Wróblewska, Iwona Zborowska, Anna Dąbek, Robert Susło, Zuzanna Wróblewska, Jarosław Drobnik
Background: The incidence of chronic diseases increases with age; about 73% of people who are aged ≥60 years suffer from at least 1 chronic disease, and among those older than 70 years, chronic diseases afflict more than >84% of the population. According to epidemiological data, at least 4 chronic disease types coexist in senior citizens, causing their disability. These are mainly cardiovascular diseases; motor system diseases; ophthalmological, auditory, neurological, and mental diseases; and mental impairment...
2018: Clinical Interventions in Aging
Yen-Feng Lee
OBJECTIVES: Pisa syndrome is characterized by lateral trunk flexion. It is an uncommon adverse drug reaction in patients on antipsychotic medication. Although Pisa syndrome has been reported in patients on antipsychotic treatment, previous studies have not discussed the prognosis of patients with Pisa syndrome. We studied psychiatric patients with Pisa syndrome following antipsychotic treatment for a 2-year period. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2014, 13 inpatients with Pisa syndrome following antipsychotic treatment were identified at our institution, from a prospectively collected database...
March 2018: Clinical Neuropharmacology
Fabian Blasberg, Lars Wojtecki, Saskia Elben, Philipp Jörg Slotty, Jan Vesper, Alfons Schnitzler, Stefan Jun Groiss
BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) is usually performed as awake surgery allowing sufficient intraoperative testing. Recently, outcomes after asleep surgery have been assumed comparable. However, direct comparisons between awake and asleep surgery are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the difference between awake and asleep surgery comparing motor and nonmotor outcome after subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS in a large single center PD population...
March 13, 2018: Neuromodulation: Journal of the International Neuromodulation Society
Aline Souza Pagnussat, Ana F R Kleiner, Carlos R M Rieder, Anapaula Frantz, Jaira Ehlers, Camila Pinto, Gilson Dorneles, Carlos Alexandre Netto, Alessandra Peres, Manuela Galli
BACKGROUND: The decrease of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) serum levels has been related to the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases as well as to neural plasticity and rehabilitation. Automated Mechanical Peripheral Stimulation (AMPS) has been investigated as a complementary therapy for Parkinson Disease (PD). OBJECTIVES: (1) to investigate the effects of AMPS on BDNF and Cortisol serum levels of subjects with PD; (2) to evidence the interplay between BDNF and Cortisol serum levels and the functional mobility improvement after AMPS treatment...
2018: Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience
Michael J Falvo, John W Rohrbaugh, Thomas Alexander, Gammon M Earhart
Cortical activity during motor task performance is attenuated in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) relative to age-matched adults without PD, and this activity is enhanced with antiparkinson medication. It remains unclear, however, whether the relative change in cortical activity over the duration of the task, i.e., central adaptation, is affected individuals with PD, and if so, whether medication corrects for any unique behaviors. Movement-related cortical potentials (MRCPs) were recorded from scalp electrode sites Cz and C1 during 150 repetitive handgrip contractions at 70% of maximal voluntary contraction, in individuals with PD (n = 10) both ON and OFF of their PD medication, and neurologically normal age- and sex-matched controls (n = 10)...
March 8, 2018: Life Sciences
E M Peter-Ross
The pathobiological causes, the shared cellular and molecular pathways in catatonia and in catatonic presentation in neuropsychiatric disorders are yet to be determined. The hypotheses in this paper have been deduced from the latest scientific research findings and clinical observations of patients with genetic disorders, behavioral phenotypes and other family members suffering mental disorders. The first hypothesis postulates that catatonia and the heterogeneity of catatonic signs and symptoms involve nucleolar dysfunction arising from abnormalities of the brain-specific, non-coding micro-RNA, SNORD115 genes (either duplications or deletions) which result in pathobiological dysfunction of various combinations in the downstream pathways (possibly along with other genes in these shared pathways)...
April 2018: Medical Hypotheses
R L Blakemore, M R Mac Askill, R Shoorangiz, T J Anderson
Recent animal studies have shown that stress can profoundly affect motor behaviour and worsen motor deficits associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) by acting on the dopaminergic system, possibly due to stress-associated emotional changes. However, systematic investigation of the influence of acute emotional stressors on motor function in PD is scarce. Here we examined the effect of repeated exposure to negative emotional stimuli on grip-force control in PD. Eighteen patients with idiopathic PD (tested off-medication) and 18 healthy controls produced an isometric precision grip contraction at 15% of maximum force while viewing a series of unpleasant, pleasant, or neutral emotional images (blocked presentation; without visual feedback of force output)...
March 6, 2018: Neuropsychologia
Angelo Antonini, Michele Tinazzi, Giovanni Abbruzzese, Alfredo Berardelli, K Ray Chaudhuri, Giovanni Defazio, Joaquim Ferreira, Pablo Martinez-Martin, Claudia Trenkwalder, Olivier Rascol
BACKGROUND: Pain is one of the most common and troublesome non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease; it can appear at any time during the disease, and it is often present before diagnosis. However, there is little or no consensus on its definition. METHODS: An expert group of clinicians with relevant research experience met to review the existing evidence, and to identify gaps in our understanding towards an optimized therapy of pain in Parkinson's disease. RESULTS: Key findings from epidemiologic, neurophysiologic, neuroimaging and clinical studies are reviewed...
March 9, 2018: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
Katharina Maria Lex, Firuzan Sari Kundt, Stefan Lorenzl
The inability to achieve adequate nutrition and weight loss are serious problems for patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). To ensure the optimal intake of nutrition and fluids and to administer levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG) (which patients need to increase or maintain their mobility as long as possible), different artificial feeding tubes can be used. Although percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes are frequently used in medical practice, there is little research that addresses key questions, including if and when to administer artificial fluids, nutrition and/or LCIG via tubes...
March 8, 2018: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
John Prince, Siddharth Arora, Maarten De Vos
To better understand the longitudinal characteristics of Parkinson's disease (PD) through the analysis of finger tapping and memory tests collected remotely using smartphones. 
 Approach: Using a large cohort (312 PD subjects and 236 controls) of participants in the mPower study, we extract clinically validated features from a finger tapping and memory test to monitor the longitudinal behaviour of study participants. We investigate any discrepancy in learning rates associated with motor and non-motor tasks between PD subjects and healthy controls...
March 8, 2018: Physiological Measurement
Gong-Jun Ji, Panpan Hu, Ting-Ting Liu, Ying Li, Xingui Chen, Chunyan Zhu, Yanghua Tian, Xianwen Chen, Kai Wang
Purpose To quantitatively summarize the functional connectivity (FC) feature of the corticobasal ganglia-thalamocortical (CBTC) network in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) by means of a meta-analysis with cross-validation. Materials and Methods For this prospective study, a systematic literature search in the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed for resting-state functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies of PD published between January 2000 and May 2017. Then, a coordinate-based meta-analysis was conducted by Effect Size-Signed Differential Mapping...
March 7, 2018: Radiology
Mouna Ben Kilani, Soufia Naccache, Rami Tlili, Dorra Mbarek, Salma Longo, Youssef Ben Ameur, Mohamed Rachid Boujnah
Class Ic antiarrythmic overdose is associated with a relatively high mortality. We presenta case report regarding a suicidal intoxication of an 18-year old female with a medical history of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. The preliminary examination highlighted a profound cardiovascular collapse. The electrocardiogram showed a PR interval extended to 360 ms. The QRS complexes were enlarged to 360 ms with a right bundle brunch block appearance associated with left posterior hemibloc. There were repolarization abnormalities such as elevation of the J-point, convex ST segment and biphasic T wave in the right precordial leads ("Brugada-Like ECG pattern")...
June 2017: La Tunisie Médicale
Asim Azhar, Qamar Zia, Shakeel Ahmad Ansari, Muhammad Amjad Kamal, Athanasios Alexiou, Nagendra Sastry Yarla, Ghulam Md Ashraf
Nanotechnology exploits materials and devices with a functional organization that has been engineered at the nanometre scale. The application of nanotechnology in neuroscience involves specific interactions with neurons and glial cells. This property is used for delivering drugs and other small molecules (such as genes, oligonucleotides and contrasting agents) across the blood brain barrier (BBB), an important requirement for delivering the drug successfully to the brain. Nanotechnology based approaches (NBA) favoured transcytosis-mediated delivery of nanoparticles to the brain by crossing the BBB...
March 5, 2018: Current Drug Metabolism
Santiago Perez-Lloret, Olivier Rascol
L-DOPA induced dyskinesias (LIDs) may affect up to 40% of Parkinson's disease (PD) and impact negatively health-related quality of life. Amantadine has demonstrated significant antidyskinetic effects in animal PD models and in randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) in patients with PD. These effects are thought to be related to the blockade of NMDA receptors modulating cortico-striatal glutamatergic-dopaminergic interactions involved in the genesis of LIDs. There are three pharmaceutical forms of amantadine currently available in the market: an oral immediate-release (IR) formulation, which is widely available; an extended-release (ER) formulation (ADS-5102) which has been recently developed and approved by the FDA; and an intravenous infusion (IV) solution, which is not commonly used in clinical practice...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Neural Transmission
Woo Suk Tae, Byung Joo Ham, Sung Bom Pyun, Shin Hyuk Kang, Byung Jo Kim
Diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) is a noninvasive medical imaging tool used to investigate the structure of white matter. The signal contrast in DTI is generated by differences in the Brownian motion of the water molecules in brain tissue. Postprocessed DTI scalars can be used to evaluate changes in the brain tissue caused by disease, disease progression, and treatment responses, which has led to an enormous amount of interest in DTI in clinical research. This review article provides insights into DTI scalars and the biological background of DTI as a relatively new neuroimaging modality...
February 28, 2018: Journal of Clinical Neurology
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