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Upper motor neuron

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078312/biallelic-scn10a-mutations-in-neuromuscular-disease-and-epileptic-encephalopathy
#1
Marios Kambouris, Julien Thevenon, Ariane Soldatos, Allison Cox, Joshi Stephen, Tawfeg Ben-Omran, Yasser Al-Sarraj, Hala Boulos, William Bone, James C Mullikin, Alice Masurel-Paulet, Judith St-Onge, Yannis Dufford, Corrine Chantegret, Christel Thauvin-Robinet, Jamil Al-Alami, Laurence Faivre, Jean Baptiste Riviere, William A Gahl, Alexander G Bassuk, May Christine V Malicdan, Hatem El-Shanti
OBJECTIVES: Two consanguineous families, one of Sudanese ethnicity presenting progressive neuromuscular disease, severe cognitive impairment, muscle weakness, upper motor neuron lesion, anhydrosis, facial dysmorphism, and recurrent seizures and the other of Egyptian ethnicity presenting with neonatal hypotonia, bradycardia, and recurrent seizures, were evaluated for the causative gene mutation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing (WES) identified damaging homozygous variants in SCN10A, namely c...
January 2017: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28069760/axotomized-corticospinal-neurons-increase-supra-lesional-innervation-and-remain-crucial-for-skilled-reaching-after-bilateral-pyramidotomy
#2
Alice C Mosberger, Jenifer C Miehlbradt, Nadja Bjelopoljak, Marc P Schneider, Anna-Sophia Wahl, Benjamin V Ineichen, Miriam Gullo, Martin E Schwab
Skilled upper limb function heavily depends on the corticospinal tract. After bilateral lesions to this tract, motor control is disrupted but can be partially substituted by other motor systems to allow functional recovery. However, the remaining roles of motor cortex and especially of axotomized corticospinal neurons (CSNs) are not well understood. Using the single pellet retrieval task in adult rats, we induced significant recovery of skilled reaching after bilateral pyramidotomy by rehabilitative reaching training, and show that reach-related motor cortex activity, recorded in layer V, topographically reappeared shortly after axotomy...
January 8, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068522/motor-evoked-potential-gain-is-a-helpful-test-for-the-detection-of-corticospinal-tract-dysfunction-in-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis
#3
Y Duclos, A M Grapperon, E Jouve, R Truillet, C Zemmour, A Verschueren, J Pouget, S Attarian
OBJECTIVE: The detection of upper motor neuron (UMN) dysfunction is necessary for the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, signs of UMN dysfunction may be difficult to establish. This study aimed to determine whether motor-evoked potential (MEP) gain (MEP area/background electromyographic activity) represents an efficient alternative to assess UMN dysfunction. METHODS: MEP area, MEP/compound muscle action potential (CMAP) area ratio, and MEP gain were tested at different force levels in healthy control subjects and ALS patients...
December 23, 2016: Clinical Neurophysiology: Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28058507/als-ftld-experimental-models-and-reality
#4
REVIEW
Rachel H Tan, Yazi D Ke, Lars M Ittner, Glenda M Halliday
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is characterised by a loss of upper and lower motor neurons and characteristic muscle weakness and wasting, the most common form being sporadic disease with neuronal inclusions containing the tar DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Frontotemporal lobar degeneration is characterised by atrophy of the frontal and/or temporal lobes, the most common clinical form being the behavioural variant, in which neuronal inclusions containing either TDP-43 or 3-repeat tau are most prevalent. Although the genetic mutations associated with these diseases have allowed various experimental models to be developed, the initial genetic forms identified remain the most common models employed to date...
January 5, 2017: Acta Neuropathologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28057298/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-pathogenesis-converges-on-defects-in-protein-homeostasis-associated-with-tdp-43-mislocalization-and-proteasome-mediated-degradation-overload
#5
G Lin, D Mao, H J Bellen
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that affects upper and/or lower motor neurons. It usually affects people between the ages of 40-70. The average life expectancy is about 3-5 years after diagnosis and there is no effective cure available. Identification of variants in more than 20 different loci has provided insight into the pathogenic molecular mechanisms mediating disease pathogenesis. In this review, we focus on seven ALS-causing genes: TDP-43, FUS, C9orf72, VCP, UBQLN2, VAPB and SOD-1, which encompass about 90% of the variants causing familial ALS...
2017: Current Topics in Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051077/fig4-variants-in-central-european-patients-with-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-a-whole-exome-and-targeted-sequencing-study
#6
Alma Osmanovic, Isolde Rangnau, Anne Kosfeld, Susanne Abdulla, Claas Janssen, Bernd Auber, Peter Raab, Matthias Preller, Susanne Petri, Ruthild G Weber
We aimed to identify the genetic cause of the devastating neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a German family with two affected individuals, and to assess the prevalence of variants in the identified risk gene, FIG4, in a central European ALS cohort. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) and an overlapping data analysis strategy were performed in an ALS family with autosomal dominant inheritance and incomplete penetrance. Additionally, 200 central European ALS patients were analyzed using whole-exome or targeted sequencing...
January 4, 2017: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28044945/recognizing-and-treating-pseudobulbar-affect
#7
William M Sauvé
Pseudobulbar affect, thought by many to be a relatively newly described condition, is in fact a very old one, described as early as the 19th century. It refers to those who experience inappropriate affect, disconnected from internal state, or mood, generally thought to be the result of an upper motor neuron injury or illness. One possible explanation for this condition's relative obscurity is the dearth of treatment options; clinical medicine is not typically in the habit of identifying conditions that cannot be modified...
December 2016: CNS Spectrums
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040732/mutant-profilin1-transgenic-mice-recapitulate-cardinal-features-of-motor-neuron-disease
#8
Daniel Fil, Abigail DeLoach, Shilpi Yadav, Duah Alkam, Melanie MacNicol, Awantika Singh, Cesar M Compadre, Joseph J Goellner, Charles A O'Brien, Tariq Fahmi, Alexei G Basnakian, Noel Y Calingasan, Jodi L Klessner, M Flint Beal, Owen M Peters, Jake Metterville, Robert H Brown, Karen K Y Ling, Frank Rigo, P Hande Ozdinler, Mahmoud Kiaei
The recent identification of profilin1 mutations in 25 familial ALS cases has linked altered function of this cytoskeleton-regulating protein to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease. To investigate the pathological role of mutant profilin1 in motor neuron disease, we generated transgenic lines of mice expressing human profilin1 with a mutation at position 118 (hPFN1(G118V)). One of the mouse lines expressing high levels of mutant human PFN1 protein in the brain and spinal cord exhibited many key clinical and pathological features consistent with human ALS disease...
December 30, 2016: Human Molecular Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28036062/an-unusual-case-of-post-traumatic-headache-complicated-by-intracranial-hypotension
#9
Sara Siavoshi, Carrie Dougherty, Jessica Ailani, Kaustubh Yadwadkar, Frank Berkowitz
We present a case of post-traumatic headache complicated by intracranial hypotension resulting in an acquired Chiari malformation and myelopathy with syringomyelia. This constellation of findings suggest a possible series of events that started with a traumatic cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leak, followed by descent of the cerebellar tonsils and disruption of CSF circulation that caused spinal cord swelling and syrinx. This unusual presentation of post-traumatic headache highlights the varying presentations and the potential sequelae of intracranial hypotension...
December 29, 2016: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28035186/rapid-progression-of-sporadic-als-in-a-patient-carrying-sod1-p-gly13arg-mutation
#10
Myung-Jin Kim, Jae-Han Bae, Jeong-Min Kim, Hye Ryoun Kim, Byung-Nam Yoon, Jung-Joon Sung, Suk-Won Ahn
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common adult onset motor neuron disease, is pathologically characterized by progressive loss of the upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) account for about 20% of familial ALS cases and a small percentage of sporadic ALS (SALS) cases, and have revealed a validated genotype-phenotype correlation. Herein, we report a p.Gly13Arg mutation in SOD1 exon 1 in a patient with SALS who presented with a rapidly progressive course, predominantly affecting the lower motor neurons...
December 2016: Experimental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018182/mapping-horizontal-spread-of-activity-in-monkey-motor-cortex-using-single-pulse-microstimulation
#11
Yaoyao Hao, Alexa Riehle, Thomas G Brochier
Anatomical studies have demonstrated that distant cortical points are interconnected through long range axon collaterals of pyramidal cells. However, the functional properties of these intrinsic synaptic connections, especially their relationship with the cortical representations of body movements, have not been systematically investigated. To address this issue, we used multielectrode arrays chronically implanted in the motor cortex of two rhesus monkeys to analyze the effects of single-pulse intracortical microstimulation (sICMS) applied at one electrode on the neuronal activities recorded at all other electrodes...
2016: Frontiers in Neural Circuits
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28017945/-pathological-state-or-cause-of-sarcopenia
#12
Yasumoto Matsui
Skeletal muscle atrophy by aging(Sarcopenia)is more likely to occur in lower limbs rather than upper ones, and in the thigh rather than in the lower leg, and in the anterior side of thigh rather than posterior, faster in men than in women. It differs from disuse muscle atrophy in that it occurs slowly and gradually, hard to be recovered, or fast twitch fibers are mainly involved. Many factors or phenomena are known to contribute to proceed sarcopenia. In the aged skeletal muscle tissue, the number of satellite cells or motor neurons decrease and the function of the neuro-muscular junction declines...
2017: Clinical Calcium
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28006827/an-automated-image-analysis-system-to-quantify-endosomal-tubulation
#13
Timothy M Newton, Evan Reid
Recycling of cargos from early endosomes requires regulation of endosomal tubule formation and fission. This regulation is disrupted in cells depleted of the microtubule severing enzyme spastin, causing elongation of endosomal tubules and mis-trafficking of recycling endosomal cargos such as the transferrin receptor. Spastin is encoded by SPAST, mutations in which are the most frequent cause of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia, a condition characterised by a progressive loss of lower limb function resulting from upper motor neuron axonopathy...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28004411/non-chemosensitive-parafacial-neurons-simultaneously-regulate-active-expiration-and-airway-patency-under-hypercapnia-in-rats
#14
Alan A de Britto, Davi J A Moraes
Hypercapnia produces active expiration in rats and the recruitment of late-expiratory (late-E) neurons located in the parafacial Respiratory Group (pFRG) of the ventral medullary brainstem. We tested the hypothesis that hypercapnia produces active expiration and concomitant cranial respiratory motor responses controlling the oropharyngeal and upper airway patency by pFRG late-E neurons disinhibition, but not via synaptic excitation. Phrenic nerve, abdominal nerve (AbN), cranial respiratory motor nerves, subglottal pressure, and medullary and spinal neurons/motoneurons were recorded in in situ preparations of juvenile rats...
December 22, 2016: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28003278/clinical-spectrum-of-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-als
#15
Leslie I Grad, Guy A Rouleau, John Ravits, Neil R Cashman
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is primarily characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons, although there is marked phenotypic heterogeneity between cases. Typical, or "classical," ALS is associated with simultaneous upper motor neuron (UMN) and lower motor neuron (LMN) involvement at disease onset, whereas atypical forms, such as primary lateral sclerosis and progressive muscular atrophy, have early and predominant involvement in the UMN and LMN, respectively. The varying phenotypes can be so distinctive that they would seem to have differing biology...
December 21, 2016: Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27995062/magnetic-susceptibility-in-the-deep-layers-of-the-primary-motor-cortex-in-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis
#16
M Costagli, G Donatelli, L Biagi, E Caldarazzo Ienco, G Siciliano, M Tosetti, M Cosottini
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurological disorder that entails degeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons. The primary motor cortex (M1) in patients with upper motor neuron (UMN) impairment is pronouncedly hypointense in Magnetic Resonance (MR) T2* contrast. In the present study, 3D gradient-recalled multi-echo sequences were used on a 7 Tesla MR system to acquire T2*-weighted images targeting M1 at high spatial resolution. MR raw data were used for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping (QSM)...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27982040/gene-discovery-in-amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis-implications-for-clinical-management
#17
REVIEW
Ammar Al-Chalabi, Leonard H van den Berg, Jan Veldink
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease predominantly affecting upper and lower motor neurons. The disease leads to relentlessly progressive weakness of voluntary muscles, with death typically resulting from diaphragmatic failure within 2-5 years. Since the discovery of mutations in SOD1, which account for ∼2% of ALS cases, increasing efforts have been made to understand the genetic component of ALS risk, with the expectation that this insight will not only aid diagnosis and classification, but also guide personalized treatment and reveal the mechanisms that cause motor neuron death...
December 16, 2016: Nature Reviews. Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956894/modeling-axonal-defects-in-hereditary-spastic-paraplegia-with-human-pluripotent-stem-cells
#18
Kyle R Denton, Chongchong Xu, Harsh Shah, Xue-Jun Li
BACKGROUND: Cortical motor neurons, also known as upper motor neurons, are large projection neurons whose axons convey signals to lower motor neurons to control the muscle movements. Degeneration of cortical motor neuron axons is implicated in several debilitating disorders, including hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Since the discovery of the first HSP gene, SPAST that encodes spastin, over 70 distinct genetic loci associated with HSP have been identified...
October 2016: Frontiers in Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956443/motor-neuron-disease-biomarker-development-for-an-expanding-cerebral-syndrome
#19
Martin R Turner
Descriptions of motor neuron disease (MND) documented more than a century ago remain instantly recognisable to the physician. The muscle weakness, typically with signs of upper and lower motor neuron dysfunction, is uniquely relentless. Over the last 30 years, a wider cerebral pathology has emerged, despite the lack of overt cognitive impairment in the majority of patients. From the initial linkage of a small number of cases to mutations in SOD1, diverse cellular pathways have been implicated in pathogenesis...
December 2016: Clinical Medicine: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942721/gradually-progressive-spastic-ataxia-in-a-young-man-steadily-unsteady
#20
Divyanshu Dubey, Pravin Khemani, Eric Remster, Jeffrey L Elliott
A 26-year-old right-handed man presented with progressive gait imbalance over 6 years. His examination was consistent with cerebellar and upper motor neuronal dysfunction. He had no significant family history. Most of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid studies were unremarkable. Neuroimaging was remarkable for mild cerebellar and noticeable thoracic spinal cord atrophy. The initial differential diagnosis for the patient's presentation was broad, but because of certain clinical characteristics, it was later focused on hereditary ataxias...
December 12, 2016: JAMA Neurology
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