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anticoagulation reversal

Sam Schulman, Peter L Gross, Bruce Ritchie, Susan Nahirniak, Yulia Lin, Lani Lieberman, Marc Carrier, Mark A Crowther, Indy Ghosh, Alejandro Lazo-Langner, Michelle Zondag
Oral factor Xa inhibitors are increasingly used for anticoagulation, but there is no approved reversal agent. Prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) for the management of Xa-inhibitor-associated bleeding has been described in small case series and one cohort study. Patients on apixaban or rivaroxaban, suffering a major bleed, were treated at nine Canadian hospitals as per existing hospital protocol with a fixed dose of PCC 2,000 units and subsequently recruited for a 30-day follow-up. The treating physician evaluated the haemostatic effectiveness as observed during the first day as good, moderate or poor/none, using an assessment guide...
March 21, 2018: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Siavash Piran, Caroline Gabriel, Sam Schulman
Direct oral factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors are widely used for anticoagulation but a targeted antidote is not available. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4FPCC) has been shown in observational studies to support hemostasis in most patients with major bleeding related to FXa inhibitors with an acceptable rate of thromboembolic events. However, the effectiveness of 4FPCC for reversal of FXa inhibitors prior to emergency surgery or invasive procedures is unclear. A retrospective chart review was performed in patients that received 4FPCC at Hamilton General Hospital from 2015 to 2017...
March 21, 2018: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
Caitlin S Brown, Wesley R Zemrak, Kaitlin J Dyer, Stephen Rolfe
Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become an important advancement for patients with end-stage heart failure. Left ventricular assist devices come with the risk of stroke and pump thrombosis, and to mitigate these risks, anticoagulation is given to these patients. With anticoagulation comes increased bleeding risk, and urgent reversal may be necessary. Reports have shown that the risk of thrombosis with prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) does exist, especially in patients with baseline risk factors for thrombosis...
March 20, 2018: ASAIO Journal: a Peer-reviewed Journal of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs
Florian Falter, Nabeel Razzaq, Martin John, Jens Fassl, Markus Maurer, Sean Ewing, Ross Hofmeyr
Unfractionated heparin is the mainstay of anticoagulation during cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) due to its low cost, quick onset, and ease of reversal. Since over 30 years, the activated clotting time (ACT) has been used to assess the level of heparin activity both before and after CPB. We compared two different methods of measuring the ACT: i-STAT, which uses amperometric detection of thrombin cleavage, and Hemochron Jr, which is based on detecting viscoelastic changes in blood. We included 402 patients from three institutions (Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK; Groote Schuur, Cape Town, South Africa; University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland) undergoing elective cardiac surgery on CPB in our study...
March 2018: Journal of Extra-corporeal Technology
Linda Shore-Lesserson, Robert A Baker, Victor Ferraris, Philip E Greilich, David Fitzgerald, Philip Roman, John Hammon
Despite more than a half century of "safe" cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), the evidence base surrounding the conduct of anticoagulation for CPB has not been organized into a succinct guideline. For this and other reasons, there is enormous practice variability relating to the use and dosing of heparin, monitoring heparin anticoagulation, reversal of anticoagulation, and the use of alternative anticoagulants. To address this and other gaps, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS), the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists (SCA), and the American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) developed an Evidence Based Workgroup...
March 2018: Journal of Extra-corporeal Technology
M Yolanda Cobo-Nuñez, Mariam El Assar, Pedro Cuevas, Alberto Sánchez-Ferrer, Jennifer Martínez-González, Leocadio Rodríguez-Mañas, Javier Angulo
Etamsylate is indicated for several anti-hemorrhagic indications in human and veterinary medicine. However, etamsylate has been shown to be effective only in specific haemorrhagic situations. Furthermore, mechanism of action of etamsylate is not known but recent research has shown its ability to inhibit heparin binding to several growth factors. We have evaluated the ability of etamsylate to interfere with the activities of heparin. Effects of etamsylate on vasodilatory activity of heparin were evaluated in rat aortic segments...
March 16, 2018: European Journal of Pharmacology
Amir Shaban, Toshio Moritani, Sami Al Kasab, Ali Sheharyar, Kaustubh S Limaye, Harold P Adams
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Spinal cord hemorrhages are rare conditions that can be classified based on the primary location of bleeding into intramedullary (hematomyelia), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), subdural hemorrhage, and epidural hemorrhage. We conducted a literature review to better understand the presenting symptoms, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of spinal cord hemorrhages. METHODS: We performed a literature search using PubMed with the key words spinal hemorrhage, hematomyelia, spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage, spinal subdural hematoma, and spinal epidural hematoma RESULTS: Most commonly, spinal hematomas present with acute onset of pain and myelopathy but a more insidious course also may occur...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
Thomas C Sauter, Balthasar Eberle, Walter A Wuillemin, Thomas Thiele, Anne Angelillo-Scherrer, Aristomenis K Exadaktylos, Gabor Erdös, Adam Cuker, Michael Nagler
Antithrombotic treatment puts patients at risk of major bleeding. Fast and adequate response to anticoagulant-associated bleeding may not only stop the bleeding but prevent severe complications. However, practical treatment algorithms to guide physicians in emergency situations are lacking. Important principles that arise from management of bleeding in general are (a) implementation of an in-house algorithm, (b) rapid identification and treatment of the bleeding source, (c) adequate fluid resuscitation, (d) consideration of the application of tranexamic acid and (e) appropriate coagulation testing...
March 14, 2018: Swiss Medical Weekly
Zdeňka Hajšmanová, Pavla Šigutová, Alena Lavičková
Idarucizumab is designed to reverse the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran. This case report describes the administration of three independent doses of idarucizumab to a 76-year-old man suffering from atrial flutter being treated with dabigatran to prevent ischaemic stroke. The last dose of dabigatran was administered in the morning of the same day the patient was transferred to hospital because of the need for urgent pericardium puncture. Baseline dTT (dilute thrombin time) reached 700 ng/mL as glomerular filtration (GF) dropped to 0...
February 2018: Hämostaseologie
Stephan Glund, Guanfa Gan, Viktoria Moschetti, Paul Reilly, Markus Honickel, Oliver Grottke, Joanne Van Ryn
Idarucizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody fragment (Fab), provides rapid and sustained reversal of dabigatran-mediated anticoagulation. Idarucizumab and dabigatran are mainly eliminated via the kidneys. This analysis aimed to characterize the renal elimination of idarucizumab and investigate the influence of idarucizumab on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of dabigatran and vice versa. Studies were conducted in 5/6 nephrectomized rats, in human volunteers with and without renal impairment, and in a porcine liver trauma model...
January 1, 2018: Clinical and Applied Thrombosis/hemostasis
Joji B Kuramatsu, Jochen A Sembill, Stefan T Gerner, Maximilian I Sprügel, Manuel Hagen, Sebastian S Roeder, Matthias Endres, Karl Georg Haeusler, Jan Sobesky, Johannes Schurig, Sarah Zweynert, Miriam Bauer, Peter Vajkoczy, Peter A Ringleb, Jan Purrucker, Timolaos Rizos, Jens Volkmann, Wolfgang Müllges, Peter Kraft, Anna-Lena Schubert, Frank Erbguth, Martin Nueckel, Peter D Schellinger, Jörg Glahn, Ulrich J Knappe, Gereon R Fink, Christian Dohmen, Henning Stetefeld, Anna Lena Fisse, Jens Minnerup, Georg Hagemann, Florian Rakers, Heinz Reichmann, Hauke Schneider, Sigrid Wöpking, Albert Christian Ludolph, Sebastian Stösser, Hermann Neugebauer, Joachim Röther, Peter Michels, Michael Schwarz, Gernot Reimann, Hansjörg Bäzner, Henning Schwert, Joseph Claßen, Dominik Michalski, Armin Grau, Frederick Palm, Christian Urbanek, Johannes C Wöhrle, Fahid Alshammari, Markus Horn, Dirk Bahner, Otto W Witte, Albrecht Günther, Gerhard F Hamann, Hannes Lücking, Arnd Dörfler, Stephan Achenbach, Stefan Schwab, Hagen B Huttner
Aims: Evidence is lacking regarding acute anticoagulation management in patients after intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) with implanted mechanical heart valves (MHVs). Our objective was to investigate anticoagulation reversal and resumption strategies by evaluating incidences of haemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, thereby defining an optimal time-window when to restart therapeutic anticoagulation (TA) in patients with MHV and ICH. Methods and results: We pooled individual patient-data (n = 2504) from a nationwide multicentre cohort-study (RETRACE, conducted at 22 German centres) and eventually identified MHV-patients (n = 137) with anticoagulation-associated ICH for outcome analyses...
February 24, 2018: European Heart Journal
Sharon Wacht, Kristin Salottolo, Amy Atnip, Michelle Hooks, Mary Bailie, Matthew Carrick
Head strikes can be fatal for patients taking blood thinners (anticoagulants or antiplatelets). Our trauma center instituted the "head strike protocol" to provide uniform and expedited care for adult trauma patients taking preinjury anticoagulants and antiplatelet medications with suspected head injury. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of the head strike protocol and compare time metrics and outcomes before and after implementing the protocol. Per the head strike protocol, patients with suspected traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (tICH) were screened for anticoagulants or antiplatelet medications by emergency medical service personnel/at first contact, activated as a Level II trauma and received a computed tomographic scan of the head within 30 min of arrival, and started reversal of blood products within 30 min of tICH confirmation...
March 2018: Journal of Trauma Nursing: the Official Journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses
Beverly Gray, Serina Floyd, Andra H James
Managing contraception for women at high risk for thrombosis poses unique challenges. Combined estrogen and progestin contraceptives increase the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis. They are contraindicated in women with a history of thrombosis and in other women at high risk for thrombosis. However, progestin-only contraceptives are generally considered safe in this patient population. This paper reviews the evidence linking hormonal contraception and clotting risk, outlines appropriate contraceptive methods for women at high risk for thrombosis, discusses surgical risk for sterilization in the setting of current or past thrombosis, and includes a review of the safety of hormonal methods for women who are fully anticoagulated...
March 8, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Melissa M Cushing, James Kelley, Ellen Klapper, David F Friedman, Ruchika Goel, Nancy M Heddle, Courtney K Hopkins, Julie Katz Karp, Monica B Pagano, Ajay Perumbeti, Glenn Ramsey, John D Roback, Joseph Schwartz, Beth H Shaz, Philip C Spinella, Claudia S Cohn, Claudia S Cohn, Melissa M Cushing, James Kelley, Ellen Klapper
BACKGROUND: The AABB compiles an annual synopsis of the published literature covering important developments in the field of Transfusion Medicine. For the first time, an abridged version of this work is being made available in TRANSFUSION, with the full-length report available as an Appendix S1 (available as supporting information in the online version of this paper). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Papers published in 2016 and early 2017 are included, as well as earlier papers cited for background...
March 9, 2018: Transfusion
Rachael Scott, Brian Kersten, Jeanne Basior, Megan Nadler
BACKGROUND: Different strategies exist for dosing four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC4) for international normalized ratio (INR) reversal in the setting of life-threatening bleeding. Fixed doses ranging from 1000 IU to 1750 IU have demonstrated efficacy similar to weight-based dosing, however, few studies look exclusively at intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to evaluate whether a fixed dose of 1000 IU of PCC4 achieves INR reversal similar to weight-based dosing in patients with ICH who were anticoagulated with warfarin...
March 3, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Vinayak Nagaraja, Greg Cranney, Virag Kushwaha
In the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease, novel oral anticoagulants have emerged as alternatives to warfarin. A major challenge continues to be the reversal of their anticoagulant effect in the case of life-threatening haemorrhagic complications. We report a case of spontaneous splenic rupture treated by splenic artery embolisation in a 77-year-old woman who was anticoagulated with rivaroxaban.
March 5, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
Margaret Smith, Glenn Wakam, Thomas Wakefield, Andrea Obi
Anticoagulation pharmacy has been dramatically altered with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of 5 direct oral anticoagulants, 1 novel reversal agent and, a second designated for fast-track approval. Trial data surrounding current trends in anticoagulant choice for VTE, reversal, and bridging are constantly redefining practice. Extended therapy for unprovoked VTE has expanded to include low-dose direct oral anticoagulants, aspirin, and the use of the HERDOO2 system to identify women who can stop anticoagulant therapy without increased risk of recurrent VTE...
April 2018: Surgical Clinics of North America
Nicholas Farina, James T Miller
Direct oral anticoagulants are becoming increasingly popular in outpatient use. These medications have lacked specific reversal agents. However, this is changing. The Federal Food and Drug Administration approved idarucizumab for reversal of dabigatran in 2016, and another agent, andexanet alfa, is currently in clinical trials for reversal of rivaroxaban and apixaban. This article examines the efficacy and safety of these emerging reversal agents, as well as other historical agents for reversal of direct oral anticoagulants...
April 2018: Critical Care Nursing Quarterly
Kevin Fortier, Deepti Shroff, Uday N Reebye
BACKGROUND: Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are approved novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) as alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKA). Physicians are prescribing an ever-increasing amount these drugs to their patients due to various advantages over existing medications. AIMS: The objective of this review is to provide the dental professional with current literature surrounding the emergence of NOACs, as well as various case studies on the subject, in an effort to guide clinical decision making regarding these medications...
February 28, 2018: Gerodontology
Sari Bäckman, Susanne Ångerman-Haasmaa, Milla Jousi, Sanna Siitonen, Katja Salmela
BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion through the intraosseous route is gaining popularity in emergency medicine. Pretransfusion peripheral blood (PB) samples are usually not available in these patients, leading to discrepancies in blood group typing and a possible delay in transferring to group-specific blood products. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ABO and D typing and red blood cell alloantibody screening in marrow (BM) samples. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Direct and reverse ABO typing, D typing, and a two-cell alloantibody screen were performed in EDTA-anticoagulated BM samples with standard manual column agglutination techniques...
March 1, 2018: Transfusion
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