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pediatric bedside ultrasonography

Yahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati Salman, Erdem Cevik, Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-Bordomás, Mustafa Z Mahmoud, Abdelmoneim Sulieman, Abbas Ali, Alrayah Mustafa, Ihab Abdelrahman, Mustafa Bahar, Osama Ali, H Lester Kirchner, Gregor Prosen, Ajda Anzic, Paul Leeson, Maryam Bahreini, Fatemeh Rasooli, Houman Hosseinnejad, Gabriel Blecher, Robert Meek, Diana Egerton-Warburton, Edina Ćatić Ćuti, Stanko Belina, Tihomir Vančina, Idriz Kovačević, Nadan Rustemović, Ikwan Chang, Jin Hee Lee, Young Ho Kwak, Do Kyun Kim, Chi-Yung Cheng, Hsiu-Yung Pan, Chia-Te Kung, Ela Ćurčić, Ena Pritišanac, Ivo Planinc, Marijana Grgić Medić, Radovan Radonić, Abiola Fasina, Anthony J Dean, Nova L Panebianco, Patricia S Henwood, Oliviero Fochi, Moreno Favarato, Ezio Bonanomi, Ivan Tomić, Youngrock Ha, Hongchuen Toh, Elizabeth Harmon, Wilma Chan, Cameron Baston, Gail Morrison, Frances Shofer, Angela Hua, Sharon Kim, James Tsung, Isa Gunaydin, Zeynep Kekec, Mehmet Oguzhan Ay, Jinjoo Kim, Jinhyun Kim, Gyoosung Choi, Dowon Shim, Ji-Han Lee, Jana Ambrozic, Katja Prokselj, Miha Lucovnik, Gabrijela Brzan Simenc, Asta Mačiulienė, Almantas Maleckas, Algimantas Kriščiukaitis, Vytautas Mačiulis, Andrius Macas, Sharad Mohite, Zoltan Narancsik, Hugon Možina, Sara Nikolić, Jan Hansel, Rok Petrovčič, Una Mršić, Simon Orlob, Markus Lerchbaumer, Niklas Schönegger, Reinhard Kaufmann, Chun-I Pan, Chien-Hung Wu, Sarah Pasquale, Stephanie J Doniger, Sharon Yellin, Gerardo Chiricolo, Maja Potisek, Borut Drnovšek, Boštjan Leskovar, Kristine Robinson, Clara Kraft, Benjamin Moser, Stephen Davis, Shelley Layman, Yusef Sayeed, Joseph Minardi, Irmina Sefic Pasic, Amra Dzananovic, Anes Pasic, Sandra Vegar Zubovic, Ana Godan Hauptman, Ana Vujaklija Brajkovic, Jaksa Babel, Marina Peklic, Vedran Radonic, Luka Bielen, Peh Wee Ming, Nur Hafiza Yezid, Fatahul Laham Mohammed, Zainal Abidin Huda, Wan Nasarudin Wan Ismail, W Yus Haniff W Isa, Hashairi Fauzi, Praveena Seeva, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan
A1 Point-of-care ultrasound examination of cervical spine in emergency departmentYahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati SalmanA2 A new technique in verifying the placement of a nasogastric tube: obtaining the longitudinal view of nasogastric tube in addition to transverse view with ultrasoundYahya Acar, Necati Salman, Onur Tezel, Erdem CevikA3 Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cannulation of a central venous line. Should we always use ultrasound in these procedures?Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA4 Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization...
September 2016: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Gregory Hansen, Jeff K Vallance, Darcy L Beer, Ian Clark, Elizabeth A C Sellers
OBJECTIVE: Intracranial hypertension is an infrequent but serious acute complication of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Subclinical elevations of intracranial pressures however, may be more common, and can be indirectly evaluated with ultrasonography of the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD). In this pilot study, we report serial data on ONSD trajectories from five pediatric patients with DKA to generate hypotheses for future studies. METHODS: Five pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes presented to our emergency department with DKA and enrolled in our study <3h after initiation of treatment...
November 2016: Journal of Diabetes and its Complications
Alexander Levitov, Heidi L Frankel, Michael Blaivas, Andrew W Kirkpatrick, Erik Su, David Evans, Douglas T Summerfield, Anthony Slonim, Raoul Breitkreutz, Susanna Price, Matthew McLaughlin, Paul E Marik, Mahmoud Elbarbary
OBJECTIVE: To establish evidence-based guidelines for the use of bedside cardiac ultrasound, echocardiography, in the ICU and equivalent care sites. METHODS: Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system was used to rank the "levels" of quality of evidence into high (A), moderate (B), or low (C) and to determine the "strength" of recommendations as either strong (strength class 1) or conditional/weak (strength class 2), thus generating six "grades" of recommendations (1A-1B-1C-2A-2B-2C)...
June 2016: Critical Care Medicine
Julia Deanehan, Rachel Gallagher, Rebecca Vieira, Jason Levy
We present a case of a 3-year-old girl brought to the emergency department for evaluation of limp after falling off the monkey bars 1 day prior. X-rays of the entire left lower extremity were normal with no evidence of fracture, dislocation, or effusion. Point-of-care ultrasound of the left hip demonstrated a hip effusion, which prompted further imaging, ultimately revealing an occult fracture of the left proximal femoral metaphysis. This case demonstrates the ability of point-of-care ultrasound to guide the management of patients presenting to the pediatric emergency department with musculoskeletal complaints...
April 2014: Pediatric Emergency Care
Vincenzo Vitale, Zaccaria Ricci, Paola Cogo
Lung ultrasonography is a diagnostic tool increasingly used in critical care. Few data are available for the pediatric population. We describe our experience with lung ultrasonography for 5 pediatric patients with common post-cardiac surgery lung complications (pleural effusion, pneumothorax, atelectasis, pneumonia). Ultrasonography was useful also for lung recruitment. Such data were confirmed by chest radiographs or by computed tomography, or both. Lung ultrasonography can be considered as a useful, real-time, bedside tool to detect specific lung diseases, reliably implementing radiographic images and potentially decreasing the total number of radiographs in critically ill children with congenital heart diseases...
April 2014: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Rebecca L Vieira, Richard Bachur
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2014: Pediatrics
B Riu, J Ruiz, A Mari, S Silva
An increasingly amount of evidence suggests that lung ultrasonography constitutes a relevant complementary diagnostic tool for adults patient in acute respiratory failure. A comprehensive and standardized ultrasonographic semiology has been described, relying on accurate and reproducible data directly obtained at patient's bedside. Therefore, pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pulmonary consolidation and interstitial lung disease can be diagnosed in a critical care environment with a similar level of performance than when reference diagnosis methods such as thoracic CT-scan are employed...
December 2013: Annales Françaises D'anesthèsie et de Rèanimation
Ghassan A Shaath, Abdulraouf Jijeh, Ahmad Alkurdi, Sameh Ismail, Mahmoud Elbarbary, Mohamed S Kabbani
OBJECTIVES: Upper airway obstruction after pediatric cardiac surgery is not uncommon. In the cardiac surgical population, an important etiology is vocal cord paresis or paralysis following extubation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of ultrasonography (US) assessment of the vocal cords mobility and compare it to fiber-optic laryngoscope (FL). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective pilot study has been conducted in Pediatric Cardiac ICU (PCICU) at King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center (KACC) from the 1st of June 2009 till the end of July 2010...
July 2012: Journal of the Saudi Heart Association
Andrea Smargiassi, Riccardo Inchingolo, Gino Soldati, Roberto Copetti, Giampietro Marchetti, Alessandro Zanforlin, Rosangela Giannuzzi, Americo Testa, Stefano Nardini, Salvatore Valente
Chest ultrasonography can be a useful diagnostic tool for respiratory physicians. It can be used to complete and widen the general objective examination also in emergency situations, at the patient's bedside. The aim of this document is to promote better knowledge and more widespread use of thoracic ultrasound among respiratory physicians in Italy.This document II is focused on advanced approaches to chest ultrasonography especially in diagnosing sonographic interstitial syndrome with physical hypotheses about the genesis of vertical artifacts, differential diagnosis of cardiogenic pulmonary edema and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, raising diagnostic suspicion of pulmonary embolism, ultrasound characterization of lung consolidations and the use of ultrasonography to guide procedural interventions in pulmonology...
2013: Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine
Kimberly Leeson, Ben Leeson
Bedside ultrasound (US) was introduced to the emergency department more than 20 years ago. Since this time, many new applications have evolved to aid the emergency physician in diagnostic, procedural, and therapeutic interventions and the scope of bedside ultrasound continues to grow. Many US scanning techniques easily translate from adult applications to the pediatric population. Consequently, US has been adopted by many pediatric emergency providers. This article reviews the use of bedside ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine...
August 2013: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Brett A Matzek, Derek R Linklater
BACKGROUND: Traumatic dislocation of the testicle is a rare injury that may result from blunt abdominopelvic trauma. The majority of cases reportedly occur in young adults secondary to severe scrotal trauma during high-speed motorcycle crashes. Our review of the available English medical literature revealed only one pediatric case. OBJECTIVE: We present a case of pediatric testicular dislocation and torsion resulting from minor abdominopelvic trauma. The case report is followed by a brief review of the available literature...
October 2013: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Margaret Salmon, Stephanie J Doniger
In an era of recognizing the risks of radiation exposure, it is important to develop alternatives to radiographs. Bedside ultrasound has become an important adjunct to clinical diagnoses and procedural guidance in the emergency department. We present a case series of two patients who presented to a pediatric emergency department after witnessed coin ingestions. Point-of-care ultrasonography was able to accurately identify the location of each of the coins, at the thoracic inlet and in the stomach, as confirmed by chest radiography...
July 2013: Pediatric Emergency Care
Luigi Cattarossi
BACKGROUND: Lung ultrasound (LUS) has become more and more popular in the first decade of the 21(st) century, both in neonatal and in pediatric age groups. Several papers addressed the usefulness of this procedure mainly because of its possibility to be utilised at the bedside, without risk of irradiation along with simple and immediate interpretations of the images. AIMS: The purpose of this paper is to update the knowledge on LUS related to the most common neonatal respiratory diseases and some pediatric acute lung diseases...
June 2013: Early Human Development
Jennifer R Marin, Anthony J Dean, Warren B Bilker, Nova L Panebianco, Naomi J Brown, Elizabeth R Alpern
OBJECTIVES: The objective was to evaluate the test characteristics of clinical examination (CE) with the addition of bedside emergency ultrasound (CE+EUS) compared to CE alone in determining skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) that require drainage in pediatric patients. METHODS: This was a prospective study of CE+EUS as a diagnostic test for the evaluation of patients 2 months to 19 years of age evaluated for SSTIs in a pediatric emergency department (ED). Two physicians clinically and independently evaluated each lesion, and the reliability of the CE for diagnosing lesions requiring drainage was calculated...
June 2013: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Mahesh Thapa, Jack-Ngnia Vo, William E Shiels
Ultrasound is an excellent tool to evaluate many pediatric musculoskeletal conditions. It may be used for both diagnosis and for guidance for therapeutic procedures. With US, the radiologist can readily evaluate the contralateral side for comparison. No sedation is typically required and ionizing radiation is avoided. Real-time information is obtained with US and the portability of US allows for the performance of bedside interventions in children who cannot be transported or are clinically unstable. Limitations of US compared with MRI and CT include limited field of view, inability to evaluate the bone marrow and user dependence of image and exam quality...
March 2013: Pediatric Radiology
Ravi Thamburaj, Adam Sivitz
OBJECTIVES: Diagnostic ultrasounds by emergency medicine (EM) and pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians have increased because of ultrasonography training during residency and fellowship. The availability of ultrasound in radiology departments is limited or difficult to obtain especially during nighttime hours. Studies have shown that EM physicians can accurately perform goal-directed ultrasound after appropriate training. The goal of this study was to compare the length of stay for patients receiving an ultrasound to confirm intrauterine pregnancies...
January 2013: Pediatric Emergency Care
Rachel Gallagher, Rebecca Vieira, Jason Levy
We present a case of a 3-year-old male with history of minor trauma, who was brought in by ambulance from the playground where he had an acute mental status change and was noted to be hypotensive on initial evaluation. History and examination did not indicate a clear etiology of his symptoms. Point-of-care emergency ultrasonography revealed free fluid in the abdomen and expedited the care of the child's unexpected intra-abdominal hemorrhage from an occult abdominal tumor. This case demonstrates the ability of practitioners to expedite and focus care with the use of rapid assessment with ultrasonography in the pediatric emergency department...
October 2012: Pediatric Emergency Care
Joanna S Cohen, Stephen J Teach, Jennifer I Chapman
OBJECTIVES: As the use of bedside ultrasound becomes more prevalent in pediatric emergency departments, the need for a national curriculum for fellows' training in pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) has increased. The objectives of this study were to describe the current state of bedside ultrasound education among existing PEM fellowship programs and to explore the interest in a national curriculum. METHODS: A 20-question survey was sent to all 57 PEM fellowship directors in the United States in February 2011...
September 2012: Pediatric Emergency Care
Niccolò Parri, Bradley J Crosby, Casey Glass, Francesco Mannelli, Idanna Sforzi, Raffaele Schiavone, Kevin Michael Ban
BACKGROUND: Blunt head trauma is a common reason for medical evaluation in the pediatric Emergency Department (ED). The diagnostic work-up for skull fracture, as well as for traumatic brain injury, often involves computed tomography (CT) scanning, which may require sedation and exposes children to often-unnecessary ionizing radiation. OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to determine if bedside ED ultrasound is an accurate diagnostic tool for identifying skull fractures when compared to head CT...
January 2013: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Antonio Riera, Lei Chen
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate feasibility and evaluate test characteristics of bedside ultrasound for the detection of skull fractures in children with closed head injury (CHI). METHODS: This was a prospective, observational study conducted in a pediatric emergency department of an urban tertiary care children's hospital. A convenience sample of children younger than 18 years were enrolled if they presented with an acute CHI, and a computed tomography (CT) scan was performed...
May 2012: Pediatric Emergency Care
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