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Frontal fibrosing alopecia

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904832/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-treatment-options
#1
Raymond Fertig, Antonella Tosti
Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a rare dermatologic disease that causes scarring and hair loss and is increasing in prevalence worldwide. FFA patients typically present with hair loss in the frontal scalp region and eyebrows which may be associated with sensations of itching or burning. FFA is a clinically distinct variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP) that affects predominantly postmenopausal women, although men and premenopausal women may also be affected. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are necessary to prevent definitive scarring and permanent hair loss...
November 2016: Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27846944/primary-cicatricial-alopecia-lymphocytic-primary-cicatricial-alopecias-including-chronic-cutaneous-lupus-erythematosus-lichen-planopilaris-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-and-graham-little-syndrome
#2
REVIEW
Chantal Bolduc, Leonard C Sperling, Jerry Shapiro
Both primary and secondary forms of cicatricial alopecia have been described. The hair follicles are the specific target of inflammation in primary cicatricial alopecias. Hair follicles are destroyed randomly with surrounding structures in secondary cicatricial alopecia. This 2-part continuing medical education article will review primary cicatricial alopecias according to the working classification suggested by the North American Hair Research Society. In this classification, the different entities are classified into 3 different groups according to their prominent inflammatory infiltrate (ie, lymphocytic, neutrophilic, and mixed)...
December 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843932/a-case-of-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-in-a-patient-with-primary-biliary-cirrhosis-and-polymyalgia-rheumatica
#3
Ariana N Eginli, Courtney W Bagayoko, Amy J McMichael
Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a form of scarring hair loss that is characterized by hair follicle destruction in a fronto-temporo-parietal distribution. Its etiology is unknown; however, most authors presently favor an immune pathogenesis. Associated autoimmune connective tissue diseases have been reported in patients with FFA. We present a case of FFA in a woman with primary biliary cirrhosis and polymyalgia rheumatica, suggesting an association between these clinical entities and supporting a potential autoimmune etiology of FFA...
September 2016: Skin Appendage Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27721910/diagnostic-clues-to-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-in-patients-of-african-descent
#4
Valerie D Callender, Sophia D Reid, Olubusayo Obayan, Liza Mcclellan, Leonard Sperling
Importance: Frontal fibrosing alopecia has previously been reported as rare among patients of African descent. The authors present 18 cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia affecting African American patients and review all published cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia involving patients of African descent. Observations: Since 2010, there have been 66 published cases of frontal fibrosing alopecia among patients of African descent; 59 women, five men, and two cases of unknown gender. Frontal fibrosing alopecia is not uncommon among patients of African descent...
April 2016: Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27688435/lichen-planus-pigmentosus-the-controversial-consensus
#5
REVIEW
Aparajita Ghosh, Arijit Coondoo
A pigmented variant of lichen planus (LP) was first reported from India in 1974 by Bhutani et al. who coined the term LP pigmentosus (LPP) to give a descriptive nomenclature to it. LP has a number of variants, one of which is LPP. This disease has also later been reported from the Middle East, Latin America, Korea, and Japan, especially in people with darker skin. It has an insidious onset. Initially, small, black or brown macules appear on sun-exposed areas. They later merge to form large hyperpigmented patches...
September 2016: Indian Journal of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27650745/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-and-sunscreens-cause-or-consequence
#6
A Donati
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: British Journal of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27613297/dermoscopy-in-general-dermatology-a-practical-overview
#7
REVIEW
Enzo Errichetti, Giuseppe Stinco
Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans), itchy papulonodular dermatoses (hypertrophic lichen planus, prurigo nodularis, nodular scabies and acquired perforating dermatosis), erythrodermas (due to psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, mycosis fungoides, pityriasis rubra pilaris and scabies), noninfectious balanitis (Zoon's plasma cell balanitis, psoriatic balanitis, seborrheic dermatitis and non-specific balanitis) and erythroplasia of Queyrat, inflammatory cicatricial alopecias (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and folliculitis decalvans), nonscarring alopecias (alopecia areata, trichotillomania, androgenetic alopecia and telogen effluvium) and scaling disorders of the scalp (tinea capitis, scalp psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis and pityriasis amiantacea)...
December 2016: Dermatology and Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27538878/-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia
#8
G Wagner, V Meyer, M M Sachse
Within the group of cicatricial alopecias, Kossard first described frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) in 1994 as a variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP). This classification is based on the histopathological findings of FFA and LPP, which are identical and therefore not separable. The clinical picture of FFA, however, is very characteristic and marked by regionally distinct structures of the skin. Typically, postmenopausal women present with a band-shaped atrophy that is several centimeters wide located in the frontotemporal area...
August 18, 2016: Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift Für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und Verwandte Gebiete
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27504707/the-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-hair-and-scalp-diseases
#9
Hans Wolff, Tobias W Fischer, Ulrike Blume-Peytavi
BACKGROUND: Hair loss is caused by a variety of hair growth disorders, each with its own pathogenetic mechanism. METHODS: This review is based on pertinent articles retrieved by a selective search in PubMed, on the current German and European guidelines, and on the authors' clinical and scientific experience. RESULTS: Excessive daily hair loss (effluvium) may be physiological, as in the postpartum state, or pathological, due for example to thyroid disturbances, drug effects, iron deficiency, or syphilis...
May 27, 2016: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27502265/four-diseases-two-associations-one-patient-a-case-of-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-lichen-planus-pigmentosus-acne-rosacea-and-morbihan-disease
#10
Joanna L Walker, Leslie Robinson-Bostom, Shoshana Landow
A 77-year-old woman born in the Dominican Republic presented with fullness of the glabella and medial eyebrows for 1 year followed by alopecia of the lateral eyebrows and frontal hairline. She stated that although she had a high hairline at baseline, it had receded in the past year. She had also noted central scalp hair thinning that started 6 years earlier. She denied all styling practices that used traction or chemical processes, although she admitted to hair dye and blow dryer use. She reported "acne" in the central face for decades and darkening of the skin on the lateral face for several years...
2016: Skinmed
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27499250/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-in-men-presentations-in-12-cases-and-a-review-of-the-literature
#11
N Ormaechea-Pérez, A López-Pestaña, J Zubizarreta-Salvador, A Jaka-Moreno, A Panés-Rodríguez, A Tuneu-Valls
BACKGROUND: Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is a scarring disease in which the hairline recedes and the eyebrows can be affected. Usually seen in postmenopausal women, FFA is much less common in men. OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics of FFA in a case series of men and compare this series to those reported in the literature. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Men with FFA being treated in our dermatology department from January 2010 to December 2015 were included prospectively for this descriptive study...
August 4, 2016: Actas Dermo-sifiliográficas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27444091/cocking-the-eyebrows-to-find-the-missing-hairline-in-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-a-useful-clinical-maneuver
#12
Paradi Mirmirani, Bree Zimmerman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27388531/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia
#13
S Holmes
Frontal fibrosing alopecia, described just over 20 years ago, has become one of the most frequently seen causes of scarring alopecia at many specialist hair clinics. Considered a clinical variant of lichen planopilaris (LPP), it has distinctive features and associations which distinguish it from LPP. Although largely affecting postmenopausal women, a small but increasing number of men and premenopausal women are affected. The spectrum of the disease has expanded from involvement of the frontal hairline and eyebrows, to potentially affecting the entire hairline, facial and body hair...
July 2016: Skin Therapy Letter
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27386462/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-and-increased-scalp-sweating-is-neurogenic-inflammation-the-common-link
#14
Matthew J Harries, Sharon Wong, Paul Farrant
Frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) is an uncommon scarring hair loss disorder that is characterized by a band-like recession of the frontal hair line with eyebrow hair loss. We present a series of patients with FFA and increased sweating predominantly localized to the scalp, and potential explanations for this association are discussed. We hypothesize that the reported increase in sweating seen in our patients may be in part related to the inflammatory process occurring locally within the skin, either inducing a local axonal sweating reflex or through direct modulation of sweat gland secretion by neuropeptides...
May 2016: Skin Appendage Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27345558/-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-report-on-three-pediatric-cases
#15
H Atarguine, O Hocar, A Hamdaoui, N Akhdari, S Amal
BACKGROUND: Frontal fibrosing alopecia is a topographic form of lichen planopilaris, which most commonly affects postmenopausal women. We report on three original pediatric cases of this scarring alopecia, including one case of female twins. OBSERVATIONS: The first observation concerns twin sisters, 14 years of age, with frontotemporal symmetric and progressive alopecia, beginning at the age of 5 years, with follicular facial noninflammatory micropapules. Histological examination showed a depletion of hair follicles with dermal fibrosis and perivascular infiltrate...
August 2016: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27294073/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia
#16
Niharika Ranjan Lal, Sudip Das, Satyendra Nath Chowdhury
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2016: Indian Dermatology Online Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27273740/familial-frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-treated-with-dutasteride-minoxidil-and-artificial-hair-transplantation
#17
William C Cranwell, Rodney Sinclair
A 46-year-old premenopausal woman presented with familial frontal fibrosis alopecia affecting the temples bilaterally. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically. Her past history included rheumatoid arthritis treated with hydroxychloroquine 400 mg daily and methotrexate 20 mg weekly. Serial intralesional injections of triamcinolone did not limit the progression of hair loss. Treatment with dutasteride 0.1 mg daily and minoxidil 1 mg daily stabilised hair loss and artificial fibre hair transplantation initially led to a satisfactory cosmetic outcome...
June 7, 2016: Australasian Journal of Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27248699/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-a-disease-fascinating-for-the-researcher-disappointing-for-the-clinician-and-distressing-for-the-patient
#18
Francisco Jimenez, Matthiew Harries, Enrique Poblet
In just two decades since it was first described, FFA has gone from being a newly described disease entity to what is today considered by many dermatologists the most common clinical presentation of a primary scarring alopecia (1). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
June 1, 2016: Experimental Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27198858/frontal-fibrosing-alopecia-reflections-and-hypotheses-on-aetiology-and-pathogenesis
#19
Christos Tziotzios, Catherine M Stefanato, David A Fenton, Michael A Simpson, John A McGrath
Since first described by Kossard in 1994, frontal fibrosing alopecia (FFA) has been something of an enigma. The clinical heterogeneity of FFA, its apparent rarity and investigators' suboptimal access to phenotypically consistent patient cohorts may all have had a negative impact on delineating disease pathogenesis. Moreover, there is a relative paucity of epidemiological, interventional and basic research studies, and there have been no advances in translational therapeutics, unlike for other inflammatory dermatoses, such as alopecia areata (AA)...
November 2016: Experimental Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27171360/flame-hair
#20
Mariya Miteva, Antonella Tosti
BACKGROUND: 'Flame hairs' is a trichoscopic feature described as hair residue from pulling anagen hairs in trichotillomania. OBJECTIVE: To detect whether flame hairs are present in other hair loss disorders. METHODS: We retrospectively, independently and blindly reviewed the trichoscopic images of 454 consecutive patients with alopecia areata (99 cases), trichotillomania (n = 20), acute chemotherapy-induced alopecia (n = 6), acute radiotherapy-induced alopecia (n = 2), tinea capitis (n = 13), lichen planopilaris (n = 33), frontal fibrosing alopecia (n = 60), discoid lupus erythematosus (n = 30), dissecting cellulitis (n = 11), central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (n = 94) and traction alopecia (n = 86) for the presence of flame hairs...
September 2015: Skin Appendage Disorders
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