keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Chest tube management

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29312751/chest-drainage-systems-and-management-of-air-leaks-after-a-pulmonary-resection
#1
REVIEW
Kristina Baringer, Steve Talbert
Air leaks after a pulmonary resection continue to be the most common postoperative complication. The presence of an air leak occurs in approximately 30-50% of patients immediately after surgery. Prolonged air leaks (PALs) predict an increased hospital length of stay, additional chest tube days and increased pain. The two types of systems used after surgery are digital and traditional chest drainage devices. Eighteen articles from four databases were evaluated for this analysis in chest drainage systems and managing air leaks after thoracic surgery...
December 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29312711/intermittent-chest-tube-clamping-may-shorten-chest-tube-drainage-and-postoperative-hospital-stay-after-lung-cancer-surgery-a-propensity-score-matching-analysis
#2
Shi Yan, Xing Wang, Yaqi Wang, Chao Lv, Yuzhao Wang, Jia Wang, Yue Yang, Nan Wu
Background: Postoperative pleural drainage markedly influences the length of hospital stay and the financial costs of medical care. The safety of chest tube clamping before removal has been documented. This study aims to determine if intermittent chest tube clamping shortens the duration of chest tube drainage and hospital stay after lung cancer surgery. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 285 consecutive patients with operable lung cancer treated using lobectomy and systematic mediastinal lymphadenectomy...
December 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29308064/effectiveness-of-etilefrine-regimen-for-chylothorax-after-esophagectomy-with-thoracic-duct-resection
#3
Yu Ohkura, Masaki Ueno, Toshiro Iizuka, Harushi Udagawa
Background: Management of postoperative chylothorax generally involves nutritional regimens as well as pharmacological and surgical therapies, but a clear consensus has yet to be reached. Methods: Retrospective review of 371 patients who underwent esophagectomy for esophageal cancer was performed. They were patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the esophagus including Siewert type I/II tumor of the esophagogastric junction who underwent subtotal esophagectomy...
2018: Esophagus: Official Journal of the Japan Esophageal Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29306264/management-of-right-main-bronchial-rupture-with-a-double-lumen-endotracheal-tube-in-a-patient-with-blunt-chest-trauma
#4
Seung Hwan Seol, Woon Jeong Lee, Seon Hee Woo, Dae Hui Kim, Jong Hui Suh
Tracheobronchial disruption is one of the most severe injuries caused by blunt chest trauma. It may cause airway obstruction and resulting life-threatening respiratory deficiency. However, the clinical presentations are variable and frequently difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a previously healthy 16-year-old man with complete right main bronchial transection sustained after a vehicular accident, who had progressive dyspnea, subcutaneous emphysema in the neck and anterior chest wall, and bilateral tension pneumothorax...
December 2017: Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29305713/the-benefit-of-ultrasound-in-deciding-between-tube-thoracostomy-and-observative-management-in-hemothorax-resulting-from-blunt-chest-trauma
#5
Meng-Hsuan Chung, Chen-Yuan Hsiao, Nai-Shin Nian, Yen-Chia Chen, Chien-Ying Wang, Yi-Szu Wen, Hsin-Chin Shih, David Hung-Tsang Yen
BACKGROUND: Hemothorax is most commonly resulted from a closed chest trauma, while a tube thoracostomy (TT) is usually the first procedure attempted to treat it. However, TT may lead to unexpected results and complications in some cases. The advantage of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) over a physical examination combined with chest radiograph (CXR) for diagnosing hemothorax1 has been proposed previously. However, its benefits in terms of avoiding non-therapeutic TT have not yet been confirmed...
January 5, 2018: World Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29305711/early-management-of-retained-hemothorax-in-blunt-head-and-chest-trauma
#6
Fong-Dee Huang, Wen-Bin Yeh, Sheng-Shih Chen, Yuan-Yuarn Liu, I-Yin Lu, Yi-Pin Chou, Tzu-Chin Wu
BACKGROUND: Major blunt chest injury usually leads to the development of retained hemothorax and pneumothorax, and needs further intervention. However, since blunt chest injury may be combined with blunt head injury that typically requires patient observation for 3-4 days, other critical surgical interventions may be delayed. The purpose of this study is to analyze the outcomes of head injury patients who received early, versus delayed thoracic surgeries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May 2005 to February 2012, 61 patients with major blunt injuries to the chest and head were prospectively enrolled...
January 5, 2018: World Journal of Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298241/is-observation-for-traumatic-hemothorax-safe
#7
Leah Demetri, Myriam M Martinez Aguilar, Jordan D Bohnen, Ryan Whitesell, D Dante Yeh, David King, Marc de Moya
BACKGROUND: EAST guidelines suggest tube thoracostomy (TT) be considered for all traumatic hemothoraces. However, previous research has suggested that some traumatic hemothoraces may be observed safely. We sought to 1) determine the safety of selective observation for traumatic hemothorax, and 2) identify predictors of failed observation. METHODS: All patients with traumatic hemothorax from 2000-2014 at a Level I Trauma Center were identified and categorized by size as small (<300cc) or large (≥300cc) based on chest CT-scan measurements...
January 2, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29290492/-prognostic-factors-in-pleuropulmonary-decortications-for-tuberculous-pyothorax
#8
I Issoufou, M Lakranbi, L Belliraj, F Z Ammor, H Harmouchi, Y Ouadnouni, M Smahi
INTRODUCTION: Tuberculous pyothorax or empyema is one of the serious forms of tuberculosis and still poses public health problems. Through a series of patients who undergone pleuropulmonary decortication, we propose our model of management and determine the main factors prognostic. METHOD: We retrospectively retrieved for 8 years 93 cases of patients with pleuropulmonary decortication for tuberculous pyothorax confirmed by histological examination pre- or postoperatively...
December 28, 2017: Revue de Pneumologie Clinique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29282107/thoracic-ultrasound-for-pleural-effusion-in-the-intensive-care-unit-a-narrative-review-from-diagnosis-to-treatment
#9
REVIEW
E Brogi, L Gargani, E Bignami, F Barbariol, A Marra, F Forfori, L Vetrugno
Pleural effusion (PLEFF), mostly caused by volume overload, congestive heart failure, and pleuropulmonary infection, is a common condition in critical care patients. Thoracic ultrasound (TUS) helps clinicians not only to visualize pleural effusion, but also to distinguish between the different types. Furthermore, TUS is essential during thoracentesis and chest tube drainage as it increases safety and decreases life-threatening complications. It is crucial not only during needle or tube drainage insertion, but also to monitor the volume of the drained PLEFF...
December 28, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29277465/optimal-timing-of-video-assisted-thoracoscopic-surgery-for-primary-spontaneous-pneumothorax-in-children
#10
Kibileri Williams, Timothy B Lautz, Astrid H Leon, Tolulope A Oyetunji
PURPOSE: There is no consensus in the pediatric surgical community about when to recommend video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). We aimed to identify factors that predict the likelihood of requiring VATS, and to compare recurrence rates and healthcare utilization among different management approaches to PSP. METHODS: A retrospective chart review and a telephone survey were conducted on all patients 12-21years who were diagnosed with PSP from 2007 to 2015...
November 23, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29273075/management-of-pneumothorax-in-hemodynamically-stable-preterm-infants-using-high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-report-of-five-cases
#11
Claudia Aurilia, Cinzia Ricci, Milena Tana, Chiara Tirone, Alessandra Lio, Alessandro Gambacorta, Angela Paladini, Giovanni Vento
BACKGROUND: Despite an increased use of non-invasive ventilatory strategies and gentle ventilation, pneumothorax remains a common complication in preterm infants. The ventilator management of infants with air leaks remains challenging in terms of both prevention and treatment. Recently the safety and efficacy of expectant management avoiding chest tube drainage to treat large air leak in preterm infants hemodynamically stable has been reported. CASE PRESENTATION: In the present study, we report five cases of preterm infants with birth weight ≤ 1250 g affected by respiratory distress syndrome and treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as first intention...
December 22, 2017: Italian Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237135/spontaneous-pneumothorax-in-children-national-management-strategies-and-outcomes
#12
Kibileri Williams, Tolulope A Oyetunji, Grace Hsuing, Richard J Hendrickson, Timothy B Lautz
INTRODUCTION: The timing of surgical intervention in the management of spontaneous pneumothorax remains controversial. The aim of this multicenter review was to compare management strategies and outcomes in children with spontaneous pneumothorax. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients 10-19 years old in the Pediatric Health Information System admitted for spontaneous pneumothorax from 2010 to 2014. Three treatment groups were identified based on initial hospital management-no intervention, initial chest tube placement, and operation; and outcomes were compared...
December 13, 2017: Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221735/comparison-of-digital-and-traditional-thoracic-drainage-systems-for-postoperative-chest-tube-management-after-pulmonary-resection-a-prospective-randomized-trial
#13
Kazuya Takamochi, Shuko Nojiri, Shiaki Oh, Takeshi Matsunaga, Kota Imashimizu, Mariko Fukui, Kenji Suzuki
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate whether a digital thoracic drainage system (group D) is clinically useful compared with a traditional thoracic drainage system (group T) in chest tube management following anatomic lung resection. METHODS: Patients scheduled to undergo segmentectomy or lobectomy were prospectively randomized before surgery to group D or T. A stratification randomization was performed according to the following air leak risk factors: age, sex, smoking status, and presence of emphysema and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease...
November 13, 2017: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221314/thoracoscopic-left-s4a-subsegmentectomy
#14
Akira Hamada, Hiroyuki Oizumi, Hirohisa Kato, Jun Suzuki, Hikaru Watarai, Katsuyuki Suzuki, Takanori Sasage, Mitsuaki Sadahiro
A 63-year-old woman who underwent a left hepatic lobectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma was referred to our department for further management. Chest computed tomography showed a lung nodule that was increased in size to 8 mm in the S4a. The differential diagnosis was metastasis versus primary lung cancer. Thoracoscopic left S4a subsegmentectomy was performed. The operative time was 158 min. The blood loss was minimal. Air leakage was not observed, and a chest tube was removed on POD 1. The patient was discharged home on POD 3...
September 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221303/the-society-for-translational-medicine-clinical-practice-guidelines-for-the-postoperative-management-of-chest-tube-for-patients-undergoing-lobectomy
#15
REVIEW
Shugeng Gao, Zhongheng Zhang, Javier Aragón, Alessandro Brunelli, Stephen Cassivi, Ying Chai, Chang Chen, Chun Chen, Gang Chen, Haiquan Chen, Jin-Shing Chen, David Tom Cooke, John B Downs, Pierre-Emmanuel Falcoz, Wentao Fang, Pier Luigi Filosso, Xiangning Fu, Seth D Force, Martínez I Garutti, Diego Gonzalez-Rivas, Dominique Gossot, Henrik Jessen Hansen, Jianxing He, Jie He, Bo Laksáfoss Holbek, Jian Hu, Yunchao Huang, Mohsen Ibrahim, Andrea Imperatori, Mahmoud Ismail, Gening Jiang, Hongjing Jiang, Zhongmin Jiang, Hyun Koo Kim, Danqing Li, Gaofeng Li, Hui Li, Qiang Li, Xiaofei Li, Yin Li, Zhijun Li, Eric Lim, Chia-Chuan Liu, Deruo Liu, Lunxu Liu, Yongyi Liu, Kevin W Lobdell, Haitao Ma, Weimin Mao, Yousheng Mao, Juwei Mou, Calvin Sze Hang Ng, Nuria M Novoa, René H Petersen, Hiroyuki Oizumi, Kostas Papagiannopoulos, Cecilia Pompili, Guibin Qiao, Majed Refai, Gaetano Rocco, Erico Ruffini, Michele Salati, Agathe Seguin-Givelet, Alan Dart Loon Sihoe, Lijie Tan, Qunyou Tan, Tang Tong, Kosmas Tsakiridis, Federico Venuta, Giulia Veronesi, Nestor Villamizar, Haidong Wang, Qun Wang, Ruwen Wang, Shumin Wang, Gavin M Wright, Deyao Xie, Qi Xue, Tao Xue, Lin Xu, Shidong Xu, Songtao Xu, Tiansheng Yan, Fenglei Yu, Zhentao Yu, Chunfang Zhang, Lanjun Zhang, Tao Zhang, Xun Zhang, Xiaojing Zhao, Xuewei Zhao, Xiuyi Zhi, Qinghua Zhou
The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy. Recommendations were produced and classified based on an internationally accepted GRADE system. The following recommendations were extracted in the present review: (I) chest tubes can be removed safely with daily pleural fluid of up to 450 mL (non-chylous and non-sanguinous), which may reduce chest tube duration and hospital length of stay (2B); (II) in rare instances, e...
September 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221279/endoscopic-naso-leakage-drainage-a-safe-and-effective-method-for-the-management-of-intrathoracic-anastomotic-leakage-after-esophagectomy
#16
Yi Zhang, Yong-Xing Zhang, Jian-Wei Hu, Guang-Yu Yao, Liang Xue, Hong Fan, Yi-Qun Zhang, Qun Wang
Background: Intrathoracic anastomotic leakage (IAL) remains a major complication of esophagectomy. Main non-surgical options of management include chest drainage and endoscope interventions. This study is aim to present our experience and assess the efficacy of endoscopic naso-leakage drainage (ENLD) in patients with IAL. Methods: From June 2011 to January 2017, 67 patients who developed IAL after esophagectomy and managed by non-surgical approaches were analyzed retrospectively...
September 2017: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29181345/intrapleural-penetration-of-a-clavicle-fracture-an-indication-for-operative-fixation
#17
Ryan D DeAngelis, Kenneth W Graf, Rakesh P Mashru
Introduction: Clavicle fractures are common injuries treated by orthopedic surgeons, with most injuries managed nonoperatively. Operative fixation of clavicle fractures is indicated in specific clinical scenarios such as open injuries, ipsilateral shoulder trauma, or fractures with associated neurovasculature compromise. Operative fixation is not widely accepted for closed injuries and is typically reserved for instances of failed closed treatment with resultant nonunion or delayed union...
July 2017: Journal of Orthopaedic Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29175355/an-assessment-of-ventilation-and-perfusion-markers-in-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-patients-receiving-mechanical-cpr-with-endotracheal-or-supraglottic-airways
#18
Torben K Becker, Aric W Berning, Arjun Prabhu, Clifton W Callaway, Francis X Guyette, Christian Martin-Gill
AIM OF THE STUDY: Mechanical chest compression (MCPR) devices are considered equivalent to manual compressions in patient outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, recent data suggest possible harm in patients with a supraglottic airway device (SGA) during MCPR. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in direct and indirect markers of ventilation and perfusion in patients with cardiac arrest receiving MCPR and who had their airway managed with an endotracheal tube (ETT) or SGA...
January 2018: Resuscitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29132697/treatment-of-postsurgical-chylothorax
#19
Janani S Reisenauer, Carlos A Puig, Chris J Reisenauer, Mark S Allen, Emily Bendel, Stephen D Cassivi, Francis C Nichols, Rob K Shen, Dennis A Wigle, Shanda H Blackmon
BACKGROUND: Postoperative chylothorax can be managed by any or all of observation, parenteral nutrition, surgical duct ligation, pleurodesis, or thoracic duct embolization. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of standard therapies, such as surgical duct ligation and observation, compared with newer treatment methods (thoracic duct embolization). METHODS: A prospectively maintained database at a single institution was used to identify and review patients with postoperative chylothorax from 2008 to 2015...
January 2018: Annals of Thoracic Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29131094/pleurodesis-using-mistletoe-extract-delivered-via-a-spray-catheter-during-semirigid-pleuroscopy-for-managing-symptomatic-malignant-pleural-effusion
#20
Jung Seop Eom, Hyo Yeong Ahn, Jeong Ha Mok, Geewon Lee, Eun-Jung Jo, Mi-Hyun Kim, Kwangha Lee, Ki Uk Kim, Hye-Kyung Park, Min Ki Lee
BACKGROUND: Talc poudrage during thoracoscopy is considered the standard procedure for patients with symptomatic malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Until now, no alternative technique other than talc poudrage for pleurodesis during medical thoracoscopy has been proposed. Liquid sclerosants, such as mistletoe extract, have been sprayed evenly into the pleural cavity during semirigid pleuroscopy for chemical pleurodesis. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a retrospective study using the database of semirigid pleuroscopy to identify the usefulness of pleurodesis using a mistletoe extract delivered via a spray catheter during semirigid pleuroscopy for symptomatic MPE...
November 7, 2017: Respiration; International Review of Thoracic Diseases
keyword
keyword
27499
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"