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High-flow nasal cannula

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333694/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-beyond-the-perinatal-period
#1
Michael Lee, Joshua Nagler
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is emerging as a means of oxygen delivery and respiratory support for a range of conditions outside the perinatal period. We aim to review the mechanisms of action and advantages of HFNC and to summarize current findings regarding clinical benefit in specific pediatric disease processes and in patients with significant respiratory distress. RECENT FINDINGS: Currently published studies outside the neonatal population demonstrate both safety and efficacy of this mode of respiratory support...
March 22, 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332328/paediatric-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-children-with-bronchiolitis-a-retrospective-safety-and-efficacy-study-in-a-non-tertiary-environment
#2
Michelle Davison, Mike Watson, Leesa Wockner, Frances Kinnear
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the safety and efficacy of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy for children with bronchiolitis in a non-tertiary paediatric setting. METHODS: This was a single-centre retrospective study conducted over 26 months (March 2013-April 2015) on children aged 1-23 months with suspected bronchiolitis, who commenced on HFNC therapy in either the ED or the ward. Changes with respect to baseline data were analysed for effect on work of breathing (WOB), heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR)...
April 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320436/high-flow-nasal-cannula-support-therapy-new-insights-and-improving-performance
#3
REVIEW
Gonzalo Hernández, Oriol Roca, Laura Colinas
This article is one of ten reviews selected from the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine 2017. Other selected articles can be found online at http://ccforum.com/series/annualupdate2017 . Further information about the Annual Update in Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine is available from http://www.springer.com/series/8901 .
March 21, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298878/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-for-patients-with-thoracoscopic-lobectomy-after-extubation
#4
Yuetian Yu, Xiaozhe Qian, Chunyan Liu, Cheng Zhu
Objective. To investigate whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is superior to conventional oxygen therapy for reducing hypoxemia and postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) in patients with thoracoscopic lobectomy after extubation. Methods. Patients with intermediate to high risk for PPC were enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to HFNC group (HFNCG) or conventional oxygen group (COG) following extubation. Arterial blood samples were collected after extubation at 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h...
2017: Canadian Respiratory Journal: Journal of the Canadian Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292963/electrical-activity-of-the-diaphragm-during-ncpap-and-high-flow-nasal-cannula
#5
C G de Waal, G J Hutten, J V Kraaijenga, F H de Jongh, A H van Kaam
OBJECTIVE: To determine if the electrical activity of the diaphragm, as measure of neural respiratory drive and breathing effort, changes over time in preterm infants transitioned from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) to high flow nasal cannula (HFNC). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: Stable preterm infants transitioned from nCPAP to HFNC using a 1:1 pressure to flow ratio...
March 14, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292850/clinical-outcomes-of-bronchiolitis-after-implementation-of-a-general-ward-high-flow-nasal-cannula-guideline
#6
Jeffrey Riese, Timothy Porter, Jamie Fierce, Alison Riese, Troy Richardson, Brian K Alverson
OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to assess the association of the introduction of a ward's high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) guideline with clinical outcomes of infants with bronchiolitis. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, pre-post intervention study with an interrupted time series analysis of infants admitted with bronchiolitis between 2010 and 2014 at an urban, tertiary care children's hospital. Patients admitted in the 24 months before and after initiation of a guideline for HFNC use on the general wards were compared...
March 14, 2017: Hospital Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292849/chasing-the-latest-rabbit-high-flow-nasal-cannula-and-bronchiolitis
#7
Brent A Mothner, Ricardo A Quinonez
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 14, 2017: Hospital Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28246239/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-adults-with-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-a-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#8
Xiaofeng Ou, Yusi Hua, Jin Liu, Cansheng Gong, Wenling Zhao
BACKGROUND: Conflicting recommendations exist on whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy should be administered to adult patients in critical care with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate its effect on intubation rates. METHODS: We searched electronic databases from inception to April 2016. We included RCTs that compared HFNC oxygen therapy with usual care (conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation) in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure...
February 21, 2017: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28246238/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-proceed-with-caution
#9
Shailesh Bihari, Andrew D Bersten
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 21, 2017: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28244292/humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-as-an-initial-respiratory-support-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-a-randomized-controlled-non-inferiority-trial
#10
Jeonghee Shin, Kyuhee Park, Eun Hee Lee, Byung Min Choi
Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress...
April 2017: Journal of Korean Medical Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28237382/application-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-to-heterogeneous-condition-in-the-emergency-department
#11
Areum Durey, Soo Kang, Young Ju Suh, Seung Baik Han, Ah Jin Kim
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 14, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223010/the-role-of-heated-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-as-noninvasive-respiratory-support-in-neonates
#12
REVIEW
Ke-Yun Chao, Yi-Ling Chen, Li-Yi Tsai, Yu-Hsuan Chien, Shu-Chi Mu
Recently, heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) has been introduced and applied as a noninvasive respiratory support in neonates. Although HHHFNC is widely used in neonates presenting with respiratory distress, the efficiency and safety when compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation are still controversial. This review aims to evaluate the performance and applications of HHHFNC in neonates.
January 17, 2017: Pediatrics and Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219186/-pay-attention-to-a-new-technique-for-treatment-of-respiratory-failure-warmed-and-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygenation
#13
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 7, 2017: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28216104/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-versus-non-invasive-ventilation-in-children-with-severe-acute-asthma-exacerbation-an-observational-cohort-study
#14
J Pilar, V Modesto I Alapont, Y M Lopez-Fernandez, O Lopez-Macias, D Garcia-Urabayen, I Amores-Hernandez
INTRODUCTION: The present study describes our experience with the high-flow humidified nasal cannula (HFNC) versus non-invasive ventilation (NIV) in children with severe acute asthma exacerbation (SA). METHODS: An observational study of a retrospective cohort of 42 children with SA admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) for non-invasive respiratory support was made. The primary outcome measure was failure of initial respiratory support (need to escalate from HFNC to NIV or from NIV to invasive ventilation)...
February 16, 2017: Medicina Intensiva
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213557/tension-pneumocephalus-induced-by-high-flow-nasal-cannula-ventilation-in-a-neonate
#15
Alicia Iglesias-Deus, Alejandro Pérez-Muñuzuri, Olalla López-Suárez, Pilar Crespo, Maria-Luz Couce
The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy as respiratory support for preterm infants has increased rapidly worldwide. The evidence available for the use of HFNC is as an alternative to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and in particular to prevent postextubation failure. We report a case of tension pneumocephalus in a preterm infant as a complication during HFNC ventilation. Significant neurological impairment was detected and support was eventually withdrawn. Few cases of pneumocephalus as a complication of positive airway pressure have been reported in the neonatal period, and they all have been related to CPAP...
March 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28205699/p-10-home-high-flow-nasal-cannulae-as-a-treatment-for-extensive-tracheomalacia
#16
T T D Nguyen, S Laberge, G Lapierre
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 1, 2016: Diseases of the Esophagus: Official Journal of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203744/acute-postoperative-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-as-a-result-of-chilaiditi-s-syndrome-contribution-of-high-flow-oxygen-through-nasal-cannula
#17
S Poignant, J Moënne-Loccoz, B Cohen, M Laffon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198753/mechanical-ventilation-weaning-practices-and-decision-making-in-european-picus
#18
Lyvonne N Tume, Martin C J Kneyber, Bronagh Blackwood, Louise Rose
OBJECTIVES: This survey had three key objectives: 1) To describe responsibility for key ventilation and weaning decisions in European PICUs and explore variations across Europe; 2) To describe the use of protocols, spontaneous breathing trials, noninvasive ventilation, high-flow nasal cannula use, and automated weaning systems; and 3) To describe nurse-to-patient staffing ratios and perceived nursing autonomy and influence over ventilation decision making. DESIGN: Cross-sectional electronic survey...
February 14, 2017: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196293/developing-a-better-and-practical-definition-of-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia
#19
Sascha Meyer, Axel R Franz, Johannes Bay, Ludwig Gortner
The synopsis by Hines et al reports various definitions of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) (1). We agree there is a need to harmonise the definition of BPD and our definition (2) was adapted from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development network definition by Jobe and Bancalari (3) It incorporates important aspects that have evolved over time, such as the use of high-flow nasal cannulas, and takes into account differences between clinical centres, including different target oxygen saturations...
February 14, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28184277/a-high-flow-nasal-cannula-system-set-at-relatively-low-flow-effectively-washes-out-co2-from-the-anatomical-dead-space-of-a-respiratory-system-model
#20
Yu Onodera, Ryo Akimoto, Hiroto Suzuki, Nakane Masaki, Kaneyuki Kawamae
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Korean Journal of Anesthesiology
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