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High-flow nasal cannula

C Guillot, C Le Reun, H Behal, J Labreuche, M Recher, A Duhamel, S Leteurtre
BACKGROUND: Viral bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization in children during the first 12 months of life. There is evidence to support the use of noninvasive ventilation in bronchiolitis. A recent respiratory management of bronchiolitis is the use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the use of HFNC as the first-line treatment for children with severe bronchiolitis and the secondary objective was to identify factors for HFNC therapy failure...
March 15, 2018: Archives de Pédiatrie: Organe Officiel de la Sociéte Française de Pédiatrie
Yu Onodera, Ryo Akimoto, Hiroto Suzuki, Masayuki Okada, Masaki Nakane, Kaneyuki Kawamae
BACKGROUND: Although clinical studies of the high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) and its effect on positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) have been done, the washout effect has not been well evaluated. Therefore, we made an experimental respiratory model to evaluate the respiratory physiological effect of HFNC. METHODS: An airway model was made by a 3D printer using the craniocervical 3D-CT data of a healthy 32-year-old male. CO2 was infused into four respiratory lung models (normal-lung, open- and closed-mouth models; restrictive- and obstructive-lung, open-mouth models) to maintain the partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PET CO2 ) at 40 mmHg...
March 15, 2018: Intensive Care Medicine Experimental
Andrew G Miller, Michael A Gentle, Lisa M Tyler, Natalie Napolitano
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) use has greatly increased in recent years. In non-neonatal pediatric patients, there are limited data available to guide HFNC use, and clinical practice may vary significantly. The goal of this study was to evaluate current HFNC practice by surveying practicing pediatric respiratory therapists. METHODS: A survey instrument was posted on the American Association for Respiratory Care's AARConnect online social media platform in March 2017...
March 13, 2018: Respiratory Care
Mihir Sarkar, Rajasree Sinha, Satyabrata Roychowdhoury, Sobhanman Mukhopadhyay, Pramit Ghosh, Kalpana Dutta, Shibarjun Ghosh
Background: Early initiation of appropriate noninvasive respiratory support is utmost important intervention to avoid mechanical ventilation in severe bronchiolitis. Aim: This study aims to compare noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and hot humidified high-flow nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) as modes of respiratory support in infants with severe bronchiolitis. Methods: Prospective, randomized, open-label pilot study done in a tertiary-care hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
C Overbergh, S Installe, A Boudewyns, K Van Hoorenbeeck, S L Verhulst
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used in children of all age ranges. The limited number of commercially available masks especially in infants and young children may complicate its use and compliance. In this report, we describe our experience with the use of the Optiflow™ (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) Nasal Cannula attached to a regular CPAP device in the setting of chronic CPAP use. This interface consists of a nasal cannula and was originally designed for the delivery of high-flow oxygen therapy...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
Anıl Er, Aykut Çağlar, Fatma Akgül, Emel Ulusoy, Hale Çitlenbik, Durgül Yılmaz, Murat Duman
AIM: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a new treatment option for pediatric respiratory distress and we aimed to assess early predictive factors of unresponsiveness to HFNC therapy in a pediatric emergency department (ED). METHOD: Patients who presented with respiratory distress and were treated by HFNC, were included. The age, gender, weight, medical history, diagnosis, vital signs, oxygen saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2 /FiO2 ) ratio, modified Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument (mRDAI) scores, medical interventions, duration of HFNC therapy, time to escalation, adverse effects, and laboratory test results were obtained from medical and nursing records...
March 12, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
Tim Leon Ullrich, Christoph Czernik, Christoph Bührer, Gerd Schmalisch, Hendrik Stefan Fischer
BACKGROUND: Heated humidification is paramount during neonatal high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. However, there is little knowledge about the influence of flow rate and mouth leak on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature. METHODS: The effect of the Optiflow HFNC on oropharyngeal gas conditioning was investigated at flow rates of 4, 6 and 8 L min-1 with and without mouth leak in a bench model simulating physiological oropharyngeal air conditions during spontaneous breathing...
March 9, 2018: World Journal of Pediatrics: WJP
Elie Azoulay, Virginie Lemiale, Djamel Mokart, Saad Nseir, Laurent Argaud, Frédéric Pène, Loay Kontar, Fabrice Bruneel, Kada Klouche, François Barbier, Jean Reignier, Anabelle Stoclin, Guillaume Louis, Jean-Michel Constantin, Julien Mayaux, Florent Wallet, Achille Kouatchet, Vincent Peigne, Pierre Perez, Christophe Girault, Samir Jaber, Johanna Oziel, Martine Nyunga, Nicolas Terzi, Lila Bouadma, Christine Lebert, Alexandre Lautrette, Naike Bigé, Jean-Herlé Raphalen, Laurent Papazian, Antoine Rabbat, Michael Darmon, Sylvie Chevret, Alexandre Demoule
BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the leading reason for intensive care unit (ICU) admission in immunocompromised patients. High-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy is an alternative to standard oxygen. By providing warmed and humidified gas, HFNO allows the delivery of higher flow rates via nasal cannula devices, with FiO2 values of nearly 100%. Benefits include alleviation of dyspnea and discomfort, decreased respiratory distress and decreased mortality in unselected patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure...
March 5, 2018: Trials
Hilde Brenne, Kristine Hermansen Grunewaldt, Turid Follestad, Håkon Bergseng
AIM: We measured electrical activity of the diaphragm (Edi) to compare the breathing effort in preterm infants during weaning from respiratory support with high-flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) or nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP). METHODS: This randomised cross-over study was carried out at St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway from December 2013 to June 2015. We gave 21 preterm infants weighing at least 1,000 grams HFNC 6 l/min for four hours and nCPAP 3 cmH2 O for four hours with a one-hour wash-out period...
March 5, 2018: Acta Paediatrica
Francesco Montecchia, Fabio Midulla, Paola Papoff
Measuring work of breathing (WOB) is an intricate task during high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy because the continuous unidirectional flow toward the patient makes pneumotachography technically difficult to use. We implemented a new method for measuring WOB based on a differential pneumotachography (DP) system, equipped with one pneumotachograph inserted in the HFNC circuit and another connected to a monitoring facemask, combined with a leak correction algorithm (LCA) that corrects flow measurement errors arising from leakage around the monitoring facemask...
February 24, 2018: Medical Engineering & Physics
Matthew L Bradshaw, Alexandre Déragon, Pramod Puligandla, Guillaume Emeriaud, Anne-Marie Canakis, Patricia S Fontela
OBJECTIVE: To describe management practices and the factors guiding admission and treatment decisions for viral bronchiolitis across Canadian pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Canadian PICUs. SUBJECTS: Pediatric intensivists. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A survey using two case scenarios (non-intubated vs intubated patients) was developed using focus groups and a literature review...
February 27, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
Taiga Itagaki, Masaji Nishimura
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Respiratory Care
David J Dries
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Respiratory Care
Feng Xu, Dongsheng Fei, Lei Jiang, Pan Jiang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 2018: Critical Care Medicine
Satoki Inoue, Yumiko Tamaki, Shota Sonobe, Junji Egawa, Masahiko Kawaguchi
Background: We describe a pediatric patient who suffered from critical abdominal distention caused by a combination of humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) oxygen therapy and nasal airway. Case presentation: A 21-month-old boy with a history of chronic lung disease was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immediately after admission, his airway was established using a tracheal tube and mechanical ventilation was started. Five days after the commencement of mechanical ventilation, finally, his trachea was extubated...
2018: JA Clin Rep
T Riva, T H Pedersen, S Seiler, N Kasper, L Theiler, R Greif, M Kleine-Brueggeney
BACKGROUND: Transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) comprises the administration of heated, humidified, and blended air/oxygen mixtures via nasal cannula at rates of ≥2 litres kg-1  min-1 . The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the length of the safe apnoea time using THRIVE with two different oxygen concentrations (100% vs 30% oxygen) compared with standard low-flow 100% oxygen administration. METHODS: Sixty patients, aged 1-6 yr, weighing 10-20 kg, undergoing general anaesthesia for elective surgery, were randomly allocated to receive one of the following oxygen administration methods during apnoea: 1) low-flow 100% oxygen at 0...
March 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Jennifer M Guay, Dru Carvi, Deborah A Raines, Wendy A Luce
Respiratory distress continues to be a major cause of neonatal morbidity. Current neonatal practice recommends the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in the immediate resuscitation and continued support of neonates of all gestations with clinical manifestations of respiratory distress. Despite the many short- and long-term benefits of nCPAP, many neonatal care units have met resistance in its routine use. Although there have been numerous recent publications investigating the use and outcomes of various modes of nCPAP delivery, surfactant administration, mechanical ventilation, and other forms of noninvasive respiratory support (high-flow nasal cannula, nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation), there has been a relative lack of publications addressing the practical bedside care of infants managed on nCPAP...
January 1, 2018: Neonatal Network: NN
Takamitsu Kubo, Hiroaki Nakajima, Ryo Shimoda, Tatsuya Seo, Yurie Kanno, Toshikazu Kondo, Sunao Tamai
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy produces noise at a level such that patients often complain. However, the noise level has not been measured digitally. METHODS: We evaluated 3 types of HFNCs without filters and 2 types with filters attached for noise reduction. Optiflow (with and without a filter), MaxVenturi (with and without a filter) and AIRVO2 (without a filter only) were positioned at the center of a hospital room. We measured the noise levels at the distance of 1 m from the equipment at various total flows (30, 40, 50, 60 L/min) and F IO 2 (0...
February 6, 2018: Respiratory Care
Mihaela S Stefan, Patrick Eckert, Bogdan Tiru, Jennifer Friderici, Peter K Lindenauer, Jay S Steingrub
OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) between 2008 and 2014 in patients 18 years or older at a community teaching hospital. METHODS: Yearly utilization rates of HFNC, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) were calculated among admissions with a set of cardiopulmonary diagnoses (heart failure, COPD, asthma or pneumonia). RESULTS: Among the 41,711 admissions with at least one of the above cardiopulmonary condition, HFNC was utilized in 1,128 or 27...
February 15, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
Y Hu, F Han
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 12, 2018: Chinese Journal of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
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