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Le My Phuong, Do Thi Thanh Huong, Jens Randel Nyengaard, Mark Bayley
Gill morphometric and gill plasticity of the air-breathing striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) exposed to different temperatures (present day 27°C and future 33°C) and different air saturation levels (92% and 35%) during 6weeks were investigated using vertical sections to estimate the respiratory lamellae surface areas, harmonic mean barrier thicknesses, and gill component volumes. Gill respiratory surface area (SA) and harmonic mean water - blood barrier thicknesses (HM) of the fish were strongly affected by both environmental temperature and oxygen level...
October 18, 2016: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular & Integrative Physiology
Kirsten Lerum Indrebø, Gerd Karin Natvig, John Roger Andersen
Ostomy-specific adjustment may or may not predict health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and/or overall quality of life (QoL). A cross-sectional study was conducted among patients recruited from the customer registers of 8 surgical suppliers and pharmacies across Norway between November 2010 and March 2011 to determine which of the 34 items of the Ostomy Adjustment Scale (OAS) are the strongest predictors for HRQoL and overall QoL and to determine the HRQoL and overall QoL of individuals with an ostomy compared to a control group representing the general population...
October 2016: Ostomy/wound Management
Anne Katz
Peer review is one of the hallmarks of professional publishing and one that I appreciate every day in my work as editor of this journal. I simply could not do this work without reviewers, and all of my editor colleagues across the globe would agree. I have been a reviewer for various journals for many years, and now, as editor of the Oncology Nursing Forum, I am even more aware of how important my reviews are for others. Just this morning, I reviewed a manuscript-for a noncompeting journal, of course-and as I entered my comments, I thought about what I, as editor, would find useful...
November 1, 2016: Oncology Nursing Forum
Marie Hauguel-Moreau, Julien Adjedj
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 25, 2016: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Karla Kirkegaard, Nicholas J van Buuren, Roberto Mateo
If a freshly minted genome contains a mutation that confers drug resistance, will it be selected in the presence of the drug? Not necessarily. During viral infections, newly synthesized viral genomes occupy the same cells as parent and other progeny genomes. If the antiviral target is chosen so that the drug-resistant progeny's growth is dominantly inhibited by the drug-susceptible members of its intracellular family, its outgrowth can be suppressed. Precedent for 'dominant drug targeting' as a deliberate approach to suppress the outgrowth of inhibitor-resistant viruses has been established for envelope variants of vesicular stomatitis virus and for capsid variants of poliovirus and dengue virus...
October 17, 2016: Current Opinion in Virology
Xiao Gao, Xiao Deng, Xin Wen, Ying She, Petra Corianne Vinke, Hong Chen
Body image distress or body dissatisfaction is one of the most common consequences of obesity and overweight. We investigated the neural bases of body image processing in overweight and average weight young women to understand whether brain regions that were previously found to be involved in processing self-reflective, perspective and affective components of body image would show different activation between two groups. Thirteen overweight (O-W group, age = 20.31±1.70 years) and thirteen average weight (A-W group, age = 20...
2016: PloS One
Igor Niechajev
BACKGROUND: The Middle East (ME) proper, a vast area between the East coast of the Mediterranean Sea and Afghanistan, is populated by many nations and tribes. Several nose phenotypes are prevalent throughout the region, but there is no published study encompassing and exploring nose phenotypes encountered in the various countries and subregions of the ME. METHODS: The current study was based on the analysis of compiled data from 1207 patients of ME origin (53% of my total rhinoplasty patient cohort) operated by the author during the years 1985 to 2015...
October 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Mark Corbett
Conceivably, in an ideal world, all patients with a life-limiting illness would receive optimal hospice and palliative care so that no one would ever wish to hasten their own death. The reality, however, is that despite provision of optimal hospice and palliative care, individuals with terminal illness experience suffering, loss of meaning, or deterioration in quality of life to the extent where they express the desire to expedite the dying process. While there has been extensive discussion surrounding physician-assisted death (PAD), there has been less attention paid to the practice of voluntary stopping eating and drinking (VSED) near the end of life...
2016: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics
Stanley A Terman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics
Phyllis Shacter
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics
Adam Marks
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics
Carol Douglas, Bill Lukin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics
Steven Taylor
At the age of 56, I am glad I never entered into discussion or read any information about altering or tampering with my NHS pension scheme (news, 21 September, page 10 ). I feel the NHS is acting like a loan shark, encouraging people to stop contributing so they have more money in their pocket today, but this will be paid back four-fold in years to come through lost pension income.
October 12, 2016: Nursing Standard
Marc Cornock
Notes made about you while you are in any health setting are not yours. If it is an NHS hospital, they belong to the health secretary; if it is a private hospital, they belong to the consultant or the hospital itself. If something belongs to someone else, you do not have a right to it. The Data Protection Act 1998 allows you to access your health records, but this usually means you receive a copy rather than obtaining and holding the originals.
October 12, 2016: Nursing Standard
Jane Bates
When I was pooped on by a bird the size of a light aircraft, I knew how my companion would react. Not with a baby wipe and sympathy, but with reproach.
October 12, 2016: Nursing Standard
(no author information available yet)
Macmillan breast cancer nurse Caroline Mercer has been at my side since I was diagnosed with cancer in March 2014.
October 12, 2016: Nursing Standard
Dominic Simpson
As a third-year nursing student my final placement was with an anaesthetic team. Two months into the placement, the emergency telephone rang at 4am, with the message 'obstetric airway emergency' - a call that no nurse or midwife wants to receive.
October 12, 2016: Nursing Standard
Lauren Ferrier
Being a nursing student can take its toll on our well-being. Now in my third year of training, I have experienced the pressure to succeed academically and clinically.
October 12, 2016: Nursing Standard
Christine N El Ouardani
Based on 9 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a U.S. mental health clinic focused on the treatment of preschool-aged children who exhibited extremely disruptive behavior, this article examines the contradictions clinicians faced when trying to identify and attribute "intentionality" to very young children. Disruptive, aggressive behavior is one of the central symptoms involved in a wide-range of childhood psychopathology and the number one reason young children are referred to mental health clinics in the United States...
October 19, 2016: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
Richard M Crooks
This article provides a summary of the Faraday Discussion on single entity electrochemistry held in York, U.K., in early September, 2016. The introduction provides some context for thinking about electrochemical studies of single entities. The next four sections follow the themes of the meeting as they relate to single-entity electrochemistry: (1) nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires; (2) nanopores and nanofluidics; (3) complex surfaces and reactions at the nanoscale; and (4) molecular electroanalysis. Each paper presented at the Discussion is summarized, and some personal thoughts as to the significance of the findings, the technical advances that made the experiments possible, and common themes between articles are interspersed...
October 20, 2016: Faraday Discussions
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