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Emergent care

Joan Maria Estrada-Masllorens, Eva Maria Guix-Comellas, Sandra Cabrera-Jaime, Jordi Galimany-Masclans, Juan Roldán-Merino, Teresa Lluch-Canut
BACKGROUND: The nursing education program framework in Spain has recently been adapted and modified. This study aimed to analyze university postgraduate master'slevel nursing education during the past 21 years in Spain in terms of educational supply and demand. METHOD: A retrospective, longitudinal, descriptive, and observational design was used. The educational offerings at 15 university nursing schools in Spain were examined. The target population was 7,871 registered and licensed nurses who had completed postgraduate education...
November 1, 2016: Journal of Nursing Education
Wiliam César Alves Machado, Vera Maria da Silva, Rafael André da Silva, Ricardo Luiz Ramos, Nébia Maria Almeida de Figueiredo, Elen Martins da Silva Castelo Branco, Luciana Krauss Rezende, Mônica de Almeida Carreiro
The present qualitative study was conducted in the second semester of 2014 via interviews with 12 doctors and 13 nurses working as managers at a large hospital that serves as a reference center for urgent and emergent care in the Zona da Mata region of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The study sought to identify the criteria that doctors and nurses use to discharge individuals with disabling neurological injury with instructions related to accessing physical rehabilitation programs. Thematic content analysis was used to examine data...
October 2016: Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
W Abel Wright, Jack M Gorman, Melissa Odorzynski, Mark J Peterson, Carol Clayton
BACKGROUND: Patients receiving psychiatric services at community mental health centers (CMHCs) are often prescribed medication that is critical to the treatment of behavioral health conditions, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and depression. Previous studies have shown correlation between rates of medication adherence and risk of hospitalization, but potential differences in medication adherence and other outcomes for patients of CMHCs by pharmacy type have not been widely studied...
November 2016: Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy
Joanna P MacEwan, Felicia M Forma, Jason Shafrin, Ainslie Hatch, Darius N Lakdawalla, Jean-Pierre Lindenmayer
BACKGROUND: Poor medication adherence contributes to negative treatment response, symptom relapse, and hospitalizations in schizophrenia. Many health plans use claims-based measures like medication possession ratios or proportion of days covered (PDC) to measure patient adherence to antipsychotics. Classifying patients solely on the basis of a single average PDC measure, however, may mask clinically meaningful variations over time in how patients arrive at an average PDC level. OBJECTIVE: To model patterns of medication adherence evolving over time for patients with schizophrenia who initiated treatment with an oral atypical antipsychotic and, based on these patterns, to identify groups of patients with different adherence behaviors...
November 2016: Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy
Linda M Herrick, William M Spalding, Yuri A Saito, James Moriarty, Cathy Schleck
OBJECTIVE: Patients with constipation account for 3.1 million United States physician visits a year, but care costs for patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) or chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) compared to the general public have received little study. The study aim was to describe healthcare utilization and compare medical costs for patients with IBS-C or CIC versus matched controls from a community-based sample. METHODS: A nested case-control sample (IBS-C and CIC cases) and matched controls (1:2) for each case group were selected from Olmsted County, MN individuals responding to a community-based survey of gastrointestinal symptoms (2008) who received healthcare from a participating Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) provider...
October 26, 2016: Journal of Medical Economics
Pablo Blanco, Giovanni Volpicelli
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) is a widely used tool in emergency and critical care settings, useful in the decision-making process as well as in interventional guidance. While having an impressive diagnostic accuracy in the hands of highly skilled operators, inexperienced practitioners must be aware of some common misinterpretations that may lead to wrong decisions at the bedside. OBJECTIVES: This article provides a revision list of common POCUS misdiagnoses usually found in practice and offers useful tips to recognize and avoid them...
December 2016: Critical Ultrasound Journal
Anna E Sharrock, Jenny McLachlan, Robert Chambers, Ian S Bailey, James Kirkby-Bott
BACKGROUND: The United Kingdom population is ageing. Half of patients requiring an emergency laparotomy are aged over 70, 20 % die within 30 days, and less than half receive good care. Frailty and delay in management are associated with poor surgical outcomes. P-POSSUM risk scoring is widely accepted, but its validity in patients aged over 70 undergoing emergency laparotomy is unclear. AIMS: To assess if P-POSSUM risk stratification reliably predicts inpatient mortality in this group and establish whether those who died within 30 days received delayed care...
October 25, 2016: World Journal of Surgery
Mirjana Cihoric, Line Toft Tengberg, Morten Bay-Nielsen, Nicolai Bang Foss
BACKGROUND: With current literature quoting mortality rates up to 45%, emergency high-risk abdominal surgery has, compared with elective surgery, a significantly greater risk of death and major complications. The Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is predictive of outcome in elective surgery, but has never been validated exclusively in an emergency setting. METHODS: A consecutive prospective single-center cohort study of 355 adults undergoing emergency high-risk abdominal surgery between June 2013 and May 2014 is presented...
October 24, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Kimberly Howard-Quijano, Ali Salem, Charles Barkulis, Einat Mazor, Jennifer C Scovotti, Jonathan K Ho, Richard J Shemin, Tristan Grogan, David Elashoff, Aman Mahajan
BACKGROUND: Echocardiography-based speckle-tracking strain imaging is an emerging modality to assess left ventricular function. The aim of this study was to investigate the change in left ventricular systolic function after cardiac surgery with 3-dimensional (3D) speckle-tracking strain imaging and to determine whether preoperative 3D strain is an independent predictor of acute and long-term clinical outcomes after aortic valve, mitral valve, and coronary artery bypass grafting operations...
October 24, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Kari Skrautvol, Dagfinn Nåden
People living with chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experienced that knowledge about their embodied tolerance limits, diet, mental problem solving, and change in lifestyle together with integrative health care could promote recovery from their diagnosed disease in calmer periods of suffering. A hermeneutic approach was used to analyze interviews with patients living with IBD outside hospitals. Thirteen young adults between 18 and 45 years of age in calmer phases of IBD participated in the study. Three main themes emerged from the analysis of the interviews: (1) Understanding limits in embodied tolerance, (2) Restoring balance is creating a new equilibrium, and (3) Creating resilience through integrative care...
October 25, 2016: Holistic Nursing Practice
Mathieu Noury, José López
Globally supported by public policy and investment, nanomedicine is presented as an ongoing medical revolution that will radically change the practice of health care from diagnostic to therapeutic, and everything in between. One of nanomedicine's major promises is that of personalised medicine, enabling diagnostics and therapeutics tailored to individual needs and developing a truly 'patient-friendly' medical approach. Based on qualitative interviews with nanomedicine researchers in Canada, this article explores the emerging concept of personalised medicine as it becomes entangled with nanomedical research...
October 26, 2016: Sociology of Health & Illness
Golam Sorwar, Mortuza Ali, Md Kamrul Islam, Mohammad Selim Miah
Modern healthcare systems are undergoing a paradigm shift from in-hospital care to in-home monitoring, leveraging the emerging technologies in the area of bio-sensing, wireless communication, mobile computing, and artificial intelligence. In-home monitoring promises to significantly reduce healthcare spending by preventing unnecessary hospital admissions and visits to healthcare professionals. Most of the in-home monitoring systems, proposed in the literature, focus on monitoring a set of specific vital signs...
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Judith Born, Jürgen Albert, Elizabeth M Borycki, Norbert Butz, Kendall Ho, Josh Koczerginski, Andre W Kushniruk, Johannes Schenkel, Christian Juhra
BACKGROUND: In order to improve access to critical patient data in case of emergency, many countries have begun or intend to implement emergency datasets. In Germany, the German Medical Association developed a medical emergency dataset (MED), which provides the possibility to store information on prior diagnoses, medications, allergies and other emergency-relevant information on the German Electronic Health Card. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study is to evaluate how the MED can be used internationally...
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Paul McKenna, Brent Thoma, Ken Milne, Chris Bond
As part of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine's (CJEM) developing social media strategy, 1 we are collaborating with the Skeptics' Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) to summarize and critically appraise the current emergency medicine (EM) literature using evidence-based medicine principles. In the "Hot Off the Press" series, we select original research manuscripts published in CJEM to be featured on the SGEM website/podcast 2 and discussed by the study authors and the online EM community. A similar collaboration is underway between the SGEM and Academic Emergency Medicine...
October 26, 2016: CJEM
M Karlstedt, S M Fereshtehnejad, E Winnberg, D Aarsland, J Lökk
OBJECTIVES: The 15-item mutuality scale (MS) has been used in several neurological conditions assessing the quality of relationship associations with negative effects of the caregiving situation. The aim of this study was to translate the original MS into Swedish and assess its psychometric properties in Parkinson's disease (PD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Following the forward-backward translation method, the scale was evaluated regarding linguistic correctness at a conceptual level and user-friendliness...
October 26, 2016: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica
Sebastian Porsdam Mann, Valerie J Bradley, Barbara J Sahakian
The incidence of human rights violations in mental health care across nations has been described as a "global emergency" and an "unresolved global crisis." The relationship between mental health and human rights is complex and bidirectional. Human rights violations can negatively impact mental health. Conversely, respecting human rights can improve mental health. This article reviews cases where an explicitly human rights-based approach was used in mental health care settings. Although the included studies did not exhibit a high level of methodological rigor, the qualitative information obtained was considered useful and informative for future studies...
June 2016: Health and Human Rights
Kerry McBroom
One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities...
June 2016: Health and Human Rights
James C Fredenburgh, Peter L Gross, Jeffrey I Weitz
Despite the introduction of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), the search for more effective and safer antithrombotic strategies continues. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombosis has fostered two new approaches to achieving this goal. First, evidence that thrombin may be as important as platelets to thrombosis at sites of arterial injury and that platelets contribute to venous thrombosis has prompted trials comparing anticoagulants with aspirin for secondary prevention in arterial thrombosis and aspirin with anticoagulants for primary and secondary prevention of venous thrombosis...
October 25, 2016: Blood
M Lima Serrano, M I González Méndez, F M Carrasco Cebollero, J S Lima Rodríguez
INTRODUCTION: Pressure ulcers represent a significant problem for patients, professionals and health systems. Their reported incidence and prevalence are significant worldwide. Their character iatrogenic states that its appearance is preventable and its incidence is an indicator of scientific and technical quality both in primary care and specialized care. The aim of this review was to identify risk factors associated with the occurrence of pressure ulcers in critically ill patients. METHODOLOGY: The PRISMA Declaration recommendations have been followed and adapted to studies identifying risk factors...
October 22, 2016: Medicina Intensiva
Julie Ouellet-Pelletier, Chantal Guimont, Marie Gauthier, Jocelyn Gravel
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess adverse events associated with diagnostic urethral catheterization (UC) in young children and to determine their impact on the patient and their family. METHODS: This was a prospective cohort study conducted in the emergency department of a tertiary-care pediatric hospital. All 3- to 24-month-old children with fever who had a diagnostic UC were eligible. Parents who consented to participate were contacted by phone within 7 to 10 days after the UC to answer a standardized questionnaire inquiring about complications...
November 2016: CJEM
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