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Steven W Barger
Ask any neuroscientist to name the most profound discoveries in the field in the past 60 years, and at or near the top of the list will be a phenomenon or technique related to genes and their expression. Indeed, our understanding of genetics and gene regulation has ushered in whole new systems of knowledge and new empirical approaches, many of which could not have even been imagined prior to the molecular biology boon of recent decades. Neurochemistry, in the classic sense, intersects with these concepts in the manifestation of neuropeptides, obviously dependent upon the central dogma (the established rules by which DNA sequence is eventually converted into protein primary structure) not only for their conformation but also for their levels and locales of expression...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
Bruce S McEwen
As a behavioral neuroscientist and neuroendocrinologist, Randall Sakai appreciated the extensive and complex interactions between the brain and the body as exemplified by his seminal studies on the regulation of salt appetite and the brain and body effects in the Visible Burrow System. He applied state-of-the-art methods to probe underlying mechanisms. Randall's view of science will live on in the influence he had on his many colleagues who were also his friends!
October 13, 2016: Physiology & Behavior
Michael Martin, Heiner Fangerau, Axel Karenberg
BACKGROUND: This paper summarizes the current state of research into the role of German neurology during National Socialism (NS) on the basis of extensive secondary literature and key original sources. SUMMARY: As early as 1933, many neurologists and neuroscientists who had been branded as 'non-Aryan' and/or politically persecuted had to leave Germany, were driven to suicide or killed in concentration camps. Two years later, the regulatory merger with the Psychiatrists' Association caused the cautious attempts of the institutionally hampered discipline for autonomy to end in complete failure...
October 16, 2016: European Neurology
David Levitan, Yaihara Fortis-Santiago, Joshua A Figueroa, Emily E Reid, Takashi Yoshida, Nicholas C Barry, Abigail Russo, Donald B Katz
: In neuroscientists' attempts to understand the long-term storage of memory, topics of particular importance and interest are the cellular and system mechanisms of maintenance (e.g., those sensitive to ζ-inhibitory peptide, ZIP) and those induced by memory retrieval (i.e., reconsolidation). Much is known about each of these processes in isolation, but less is known concerning how they interact. It is known that ZIP sensitivity and memory retrieval share at least some molecular targets (e...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Vijay Mohan K Namboodiri, Jose Rodriguez-Romaguera, Garret D Stuber
The habenula is a tiny brain region the size of a pea in humans. This region is highly conserved across vertebrates and has been traditionally overlooked by neuroscientists. The name habenula is derived from the Latin word habena, meaning "little rein", because of its elongated shape. Originally its function was thought to be related to the regulation of the nearby pineal gland (which Rene Descartes described as the "principal seat of the soul"). More recent evidence, however, demonstrates that the habenula acts as a critical neuroanatomical hub that connects and regulates brain regions important for divergent motivational states and cognition...
October 10, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Rommy von Bernhardi, Jaime Eugenín-von Bernhardi, Betsi Flores, Jaime Eugenín León
Today, there is enormous progress in understanding the function of glial cells, including astroglia, oligodendroglia, Schwann cells, and microglia. Around 150 years ago, glia were viewed as a glue among neurons. During the course of the twentieth century, microglia were discovered and neuroscientists' views evolved toward considering glia only as auxiliary cells of neurons. However, over the last two to three decades, glial cells' importance has been reconsidered because of the evidence on their involvement in defining central nervous system architecture, brain metabolism, the survival of neurons, development and modulation of synaptic transmission, propagation of nerve impulses, and many other physiological functions...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Alianna J Maren
Effective Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) require that the time-varying activation patterns of 2-D neural ensembles be modelled. The cluster variation method (CVM) offers a means for the characterization of 2-D local pattern distributions. This paper provides neuroscientists and BCI researchers with a CVM tutorial that will help them to understand how the CVM statistical thermodynamics formulation can model 2-D pattern distributions expressing structural and functional dynamics in the brain. The premise is that local-in-time free energy minimization works alongside neural connectivity adaptation, supporting the development and stabilization of consistent stimulus-specific responsive activation patterns...
September 30, 2016: Brain Sciences
R K W Schwarting, S Busse
When parts of the brain suffer from damage, certain functional deficits or impairments are the expected and typical outcome. A myriad of examples show such negative consequences, which afford the daily tasks of neurologists, neuropsychologists, and also behavioral neuroscientists working with experimental brain lesions. Compared to lesion-induced deficits, examples for functional enhancements or facilitation after brain lesions are rather rare and usually not well studied. Here, the mammalian hippocampus seems to provide an exception, since substantial evidence shows that its damage can have facilitatory behavioral effects under certain conditions...
September 28, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Tiffany S Doherty, Tania L Roth
The efforts of many neuroscientists are directed toward understanding the appreciable plasticity of the brain and behavior. In recent years, epigenetics has become a core of this focus as a prime mechanistic candidate for behavioral modifications. Animal models have been instrumental in advancing our understanding of environmentally driven changes to the epigenome in the developing and adult brain. This review focuses mainly on such discoveries driven by adverse environments along with their associated behavioral outcomes...
September 30, 2016: Development and Psychopathology
Helen H Yang, François St-Pierre
UNLABELLED: A longstanding goal in neuroscience is to understand how spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal electrical activity underlie brain function, from sensory representations to decision making. An emerging technology for monitoring electrical dynamics, voltage imaging using genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs), couples the power of genetics with the advantages of light. Here, we review the properties that determine indicator performance and applicability, discussing both recent progress and technical limitations...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Sarah M Kark, Scott D Slotnick, Elizabeth A Kensinger
Most studies using a recognition memory paradigm examine the neural processes that support the ability to consciously recognize past events. However, there can also be nonconscious influences from the prior study episode that reflect repetition suppression effects-a reduction in the magnitude of activity for repeated presentations of stimuli-that are revealed by comparing neural activity associated with forgotten items to correctly rejected novel items. The present fMRI study examined the effect of emotional valence (positive vs...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Katherine Shats, Timothy Brindley, James Giordano
Ongoing developments in neuroscientific techniques and technologies-such as neuroimaging-offer potential for greater insight into human behavior and have fostered temptation to use these approaches in legal contexts. Neuroscientists are increasingly called on to provide expert testimony, interpret brain images, and thereby inform judges and juries who are tasked with determining the guilt or innocence of an individual. In this essay, we draw attention to the actual capabilities and limitations of currently available assessment neurotechnologies and examine whether neuroscientific evidence presents unique challenges to existing frameworks of evidence law...
October 2016: Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics: CQ: the International Journal of Healthcare Ethics Committees
Tiffany C Ho, Stephan J Sanders, Ian H Gotlib, Fumiko Hoeft
Neuroscientists are increasingly using advanced neuroimaging methods to elucidate the intergenerational transmission of human brain circuitry. This new line of work promises to shed light on the ontogeny of complex behavioral traits, including psychiatric disorders, and possible mechanisms of transmission. Here we highlight recent intergenerational neuroimaging studies and provide recommendations for future work.
October 2016: Trends in Neurosciences
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No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Neuroscientist: a Review Journal Bringing Neurobiology, Neurology and Psychiatry
Egor Dzyubenko, Andrey Rozenberg, Dirk M Hermann, Andreas Faissner
BACKGROUND: Quantification of synapses and their morphological analysis are extensively used in network development and connectivity studies, drug screening and other areas of neuroscience. Thus, a number of quantitative approaches were introduced so far. However, most of the available methods are highly tailored to specific applications and have limitations for widespread use. NEW METHOD: We present a new plugin for the open-source software ImageJ to provide a modifiable, high-throughput and easy to use method for synaptic puncta analysis...
September 8, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
Luigi F Cuturi, Elena Aggius-Vella, Claudio Campus, Alberto Parmiggiani, Monica Gori
The last quarter of a century has seen a dramatic rise of interest in the development of technological solutions for visually impaired people. However, despite the presence of many devices, user acceptance is low. Not only are visually impaired adults not using these devices but they are also too complex for children. The majority of these devices have been developed without considering either the brain mechanisms underlying the deficit or the natural ability of the brain to process information. Most of them use complex feedback systems and overwhelm sensory, attentional and memory capacities...
September 5, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Camila Shirota, Jelka Jansa, Javier Diaz, Sivakumar Balasubramanian, Stefano Mazzoleni, N Alberto Borghese, Alejandro Melendez-Calderon
Well-developed coordination of the upper extremities is critical for function in everyday life. Interlimb coordination is an intuitive, yet subjective concept that refers to spatio-temporal relationships between kinematic, kinetic and physiological variables of two or more limbs executing a motor task with a common goal. While both the clinical and neuroscience communities agree on the relevance of assessing and quantifying interlimb coordination, rehabilitation engineers struggle to translate the knowledge and needs of clinicians and neuroscientists into technological devices for the impaired...
2016: Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation
Cara Margherio, M Claire Horner-Devine, Sheri J Y Mizumori, Joyce W Yen
Broadening the Representation of Academic Investigators in NeuroScience is a National Institutes of Health-funded, national program that addresses challenges to the persistence of diverse early-career neuroscientists. In doing so, BRAINS aims to advance diversity in neuroscience by increasing career advancement and retention of post-PhD, early-career neuroscientists from underrepresented groups (URGs). The comprehensive professional development program is structured to catalyze conversations specific to URGs in neuroscience and explicitly addresses factors known to impact persistence such as a weak sense of belonging to the scientific community, isolation and solo status, inequitable access to resources that impact career success, and marginalization from informal networks and mentoring relationships...
2016: CBE Life Sciences Education
Wolfgang Oertel, Jörg B Schulz
Over a period of more than 50 years, the symptomatic treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD) has been optimized using pharmacotherapy, deep brain stimulation, and physiotherapy. The arsenal of pharmacotherapies includes L-Dopa, several dopamine agonists, inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B and catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT), and amantadine. In the later course of the disease, motor complications occur, at which stage different oral formulations of L-Dopa or dopamine agonists with long half-life, a transdermal application or parenteral pumps for continuous drug supply can be subscribed...
October 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
Catherine N Hall, Clare Howarth, Zebulun Kurth-Nelson, Anusha Mishra
Cognitive neuroscience depends on the use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to probe brain function. Although commonly used as a surrogate measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signals actually reflect changes in brain blood oxygenation. Understanding the mechanisms linking neuronal activity to vascular perfusion is, therefore, critical in interpreting BOLD. Advances in cellular neuroscience demonstrating differences in this neurovascular relationship in different brain regions, conditions or pathologies are often not accounted for when interpreting BOLD...
October 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
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