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neuron degeneration

Kristin Politi, Serge Przedborski
A recent study reports that microglia and oligodendrocytes promote motor neuron degeneration by inducing inflammation and necroptosis in a manner dependent on receptor-interacting kinase 1 (RIPK1). These findings could be significant for our understanding of the neurobiology and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
October 24, 2016: Current Biology: CB
Maxime Wc Rousseaux, Maria de Haro, Cristian A Lasagna-Reeves, Antonia De Maio, Jeehye Park, Paymaan Jafar-Nejad, Ismael Al-Ramahi, Ajay Sharma, Lauren See, Nan Lu, Luis Vilanova-Velez, Tiemo J Klisch, Thomas F Westbrook, Juan C Troncoso, Juan Botas, Huda Y Zoghbi
Several neurodegenerative diseases are driven by the toxic gain-of-function of specific proteins within the brain. Elevated levels of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) appear to drive neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease (PD); neuronal accumulation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD); and their increased levels cause neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms. Despite the clinical differences between AD and PD, several lines of evidence suggest that α-Syn and tau overlap pathologically. The connections between α-Syn and tau led us to ask whether these proteins might be regulated through a shared pathway...
October 25, 2016: ELife
Xi-Xun DU, Kang Qin, Qian Jiao, Jun-Xia Xie, Hong Jiang
ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP), as an inward rectifying potassium channel, are widely distributed in many types of tissues. KATP are activated by the depletion of ATP level and the increase in oxidative stress in cells. The activity of KATP couples cell metabolism with electrical activity and results in membrane hyperpolarization. KATP are ubiquitously distributed in the brain, including substantia nigra, hippocampus, hypothalamus, cerebral cortex, dorsal nucleus of vagus and glial cells, and participate in neuronal excitability, mitochondria homeostasis and neurotransmitter release...
October 25, 2016: Sheng Li Xue Bao: [Acta Physiologica Sinica]
Anna Nolte, Aimara Bello, Michaela Drögemüller, Tosso Leeb, Eva Brockhaus, Wolfgang Baumgärtner, Peter Wohlsein
A female, 5-year-old American Staffordshire Terrier with severe progressive neurological deficits, particularly in terms of ataxia and keeping balance, was examined pathomorphologically and a genetic analysis was performed. In neurons of various localizations of the central nervous system an accumulation of a finely granular pale eosinophilic or light brown material was found. In addition, the cerebellum revealed marked degeneration and loss of Purkinje and inner granule cells. The accumulated PAS-positive, argyrophilic, autofluorescent material showed ultrastructurally a lamellar appearance suggestive of lipofuscin...
October 25, 2016: Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere
Milo B Fasken, Jillian S Losh, Sara W Leung, Sergine Brutus, Brittany Avin, Jillian C Vaught, Jennifer Potter-Birriel, Taylor Craig, Graeme L Conn, Katherine Mills-Lujan, Anita H Corbett, Ambro van Hoof
Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia type 1b (PCH1b) is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes cerebellar hypoplasia and spinal motor neuron degeneration leading to mortality in early childhood. PCH1b is caused by mutations in the RNA exosome subunit gene, EXOSC3 The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved complex, consisting of nine different core subunits and one or two 3'-5' exoribonuclease subunits, that mediates several RNA degradation and processing steps. The goal of this study is to assess the functional consequences of the amino acid substitutions that have been identified in EXOSC3 in PCH1b patients...
October 24, 2016: Genetics
Manel Ben Aissa, Sue H Lee, Brian M Bennett, Gregory R J Thatcher
cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) plays a central role in various aspects of central nervous system (CNS) function, ranging from the developmental stages to neuronal plasticity and survival in adult brain. Activation of CREB plays a crucial role in learning and memory and is at the convergence of multiple intracellular signaling cascades including CAMKII and MAPK. This review focuses on the important functions of nitric oxide (NO) in activating CREB via the NO receptor, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and production of the second messenger, cGMP...
2016: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Ranjit Singh, Ranju Bansal
Neuroinflammatory mechanisms mediated by activated glial and cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) might contribute neuronal degeneration leading to Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an inflammogen derived from the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria, which promotes neuroinflammation and subsequent neurodegeneration. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and testosterone have been reported as neuroprotective steroids useful for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, several 16-arylidene steroidal derivatives have been evaluated as neuroprotective agents in LPS-treated animal models...
October 24, 2016: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
J Lagarde, M Sarazin
Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) in its behavioral variant (bvFTD) is probably one of the conditions that best illustrates the links between psychiatry and neurology. It is indeed admitted that between a third and half of patients with this condition, especially in early-onset forms, receive an initial diagnosis of psychiatric disorder (depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder) and are then referred to a psychiatric ward. BvFTD can thus be considered a neurological disorder with a psychiatric presentation...
October 20, 2016: L'Encéphale
Jonathan Boyd, Alice Han
Deguelin is one of four major naturally occurring rotenoids isolated from root extracts and is best recognized as a NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) inhibitor, resulting in significant alterations in mitochondrial function. Deguelin has also been implicated as a regulator of apoptosis through signaling pathways, such as the (PI3K)/Akt pathway, as well as an initiator of cell cycle arrest. Consequently, this compound has accrued great interest as a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic. Additionally, deguelin exposure has been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD)...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Andrew G Yee, Peter S Freestone, Ji-Zhong Bai, Janusz Lipski
Parkinson's disease (PD) is not only associated with degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the Substantia Nigra, but also with profound loss of noradrenergic neurons in the Locus Coeruleus (LC). Remarkably, LC degeneration may exceed, or even precede the loss of nigral DAergic neurons, suggesting that LC neurons may be more susceptible to damage by various insults. Using a combination of electrophysiology, fluorescence imaging and electrochemistry, we directly compared the responses of LC, nigral DAergic and nigral non-dopaminergic (non-DAergic) neurons in rat brain slices to acute application of rotenone, a mitochondrial toxin used to create animal and in vitro models of PD...
October 19, 2016: Experimental Neurology
Tianfang Jiang, Qian Sun, Shengdi Chen
Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the overproduction and incorporation of free radicals and the dynamic ability of a biosystem to detoxify reactive intermediates. Free radicals produced by oxidative stress are one of the common features in several experimental models of diseases. Free radicals affect both the structure and function of neural cells, and contribute to a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Although the precise mechanisms that result in the degeneration of neurons and the relevant pathological changes remain unclear, the crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is associated with several proteins (such as α-synuclein, DJ-1, Amyloid β and tau protein) and some signaling pathways (such as extracellular regulated protein kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Protein Kinase B pathway and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2) that are tightly associated with the neural damage...
October 18, 2016: Progress in Neurobiology
Dan Li, Nan Liu, Liang Zhao, Lei Tong, Hitoshi Kawano, Hong-Jing Yan, Hong-Peng Li
Nigrostriatal pathway injury is one of the traumatic brain injury models that usually lead to neurological dysfunction or neuron necrosis. Resveratrol-induced benefits have recently been demonstrated in several models of neuronal degeneration diseases. However, the protective properties of resveratrol against neurodegeneration have not been explored definitely. Thus, we employ the nigrostriatal pathway injury model to mimic the insults on the brain. Resveratrol decreased the p-ERK expression and increased the p-JNK expression compared to the DMSO group, but not alter the p38 MAPK proteins around the lesion site by Western blot...
October 18, 2016: Brain Research
Marion T Turnbull, Elizabeth J Coulson
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, irreversible neurodegenerative disease that destroys memory and cognitive function. Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein are a prominent feature in the brain of patients with AD, and are a major contributor to neuronal toxicity and disease progression. However, the factors that initiate the toxic cascade that results in tau hyperphosphorylation in sporadic AD are unknown. Here we investigated whether degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs) and/or a resultant decrease in neurotrophin signaling cause aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Qian Cai, Prasad Tammineni
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by brain deposition of amyloid plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles along with steady cognitive decline. Synaptic damage, an early pathological event, correlates strongly with cognitive deficits and memory loss. Mitochondria are essential organelles for synaptic function. Neurons utilize specialized mechanisms to drive mitochondrial trafficking to synapses in which mitochondria buffer Ca2+ and serve as local energy sources by supplying ATP to sustain neurotransmitter release...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Ramón Martínez-Mármol, Bruna Barneda-Zahonero, David Soto, Rosa Maria Andrés, Elena Coccia, Xavier Gasull, Laura Planells-Ferrer, Rana S Moubarak, Eduardo Soriano, Joan X Comella
Caspases have recently emerged as key regulators of axonal pruning and degeneration and of long-term depression (LTD), a long-lasting form of synaptic plasticity. However, the mechanism underlying these functions remains unclear. In this context, XIAP has been shown to modulate these processes. The neuron-specific form of FAIM protein (FAIM-L) is a death receptor antagonist that stabilizes XIAP protein levels, thus preventing death receptor-induced neuronal apoptosis. Here we show that FAIM-L modulates synaptic transmission, prevents chemical-LTD induction in hippocampal neurons, and thwarts axon degeneration after nerve growth factor (NGF) withdrawal...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Ewa Papuć, Konrad Rejdak
There is emerging evidence that glial cells are involved in the neuropathological process in Parkinson's disease (PD) in addition to degeneration of neuronal structures. Recently, we confirmed the presence of an adaptive immune response against different glial-derived antigens in PD, with a possible role of anti-MAG, anti-MBP and anti-PLP antibodies in the disease progression. The aim of the present study was to assess humoral response against myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) in patients with parkinsonism (both idiopathic and atypical) to check whether these antibodies could serve as biomarkers of PD, its severity and progression...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
Jiao Li, Yi Lu, Huiting Liang, Chunyan Tang, Lei Zhu, Jie Zhang, Renshi Xu
In order to searching the possible pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we examined the expression and distribution of FUS/TLS protein in the different anatomic regions, segments and neural cells of adult spinal cord at the different stages of the SOD1 wild-type and G93A transgenic mice using the fluorescent immunohistochemistry. Result revealed that, in the SOD1 wild-type mice, the FUS/TLS expression almost wasn't detected. However, in the SOD1 G93A mice, the FUS/TLS expression in the white matter was significantly more than that in the gray matter...
2016: International Journal of Biological Sciences
A Hosseini, H R Sadeghnia, A Rajabian
Oxidative stress and apoptosis contribute to neuronal degeneration in many neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is considered responsible for the pathogenesis of many neurological disorders. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is thought to be involved in glutamate-induced apoptosis process. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of Citrus aurantium in the glutamate-induced rat's adrenal pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 cells) were investigated...
2016: Folia Neuropathologica
Vitor Castania, Ana Carolina Issy, João Walter Silveira, Frederico Rogério Ferreira, Simoneide S Titze-de-Almeida, Fernando F B Resende, Nádia Rubia Ferreira, Ricardo Titze-de-Almeida, Helton L A Defino, Elaine Del Bel
Intervertebral disk degeneration is a progressive and debilitating disease with multifactorial causes. Nitric oxide (NO) might contribute to the cell death pathway. We evaluated the presence of the constitutive form of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) in both health and degenerated intervertebral disk through qPCR and immunohistochemistry. We also analyzed the potential role of nNOS modulation in the tail needle puncture model of intervertebral disk degeneration. Male Wistar rats were submitted to percutaneous disk puncture with a 21-gauge needle of coccygeal vertebras...
October 19, 2016: Neurotoxicity Research
Katherine Zukor, Hong Wang, Brett L Hurst, Venkatraman Siddharthan, Arnaud Van Wettere, Paul M Pilowsky, John D Morrey
Neurological respiratory deficits are serious outcomes of West Nile virus (WNV) disease. WNV patients requiring intubation have a poor prognosis. We previously reported that WNV-infected rodents also appear to have respiratory deficits when assessed by whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic electromyography. The purpose of this study was to determine if the nature of the respiratory deficits in WNV-infected rodents is neurological and if deficits are due to a disorder of brainstem respiratory centers, cervical spinal cord (CSC) phrenic motor neuron (PMN) circuitry, or both...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Neurovirology
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