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facial paralysis

Hua Zhao, Xin Zhang, Yinda Tang, Shiting Li
OBJECTIVE: To determine the plasma fibrinogen level in patients with Bell palsy and explore the significances of it in Bell palsy. METHODS: One hundred five consecutive patients with facial paralysis were divided into 3 groups: group I (Bell palsy), group II (temporal bone fractures), and group III (facial nerve schwannoma). In addition, 22 volunteers were defined as control group. Two milliliters fasting venous blood from elbow was collected, and was evaluated by CA-7000 Full-Automatic Coagulation Analyzer...
October 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Ishita Chen, Raymond B Fohtung, Hanadi Ajam Oughli, Robert Bauer, Caline Mattar, William G Powderly, Mark S Thoelke
Ramsay Hunt Syndrome (RHS) is a rare complication of latent varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection that can occur in immunocompetent host. It usually involves ipsilateral facial paralysis, ear pain and facial vesicles. Disseminated herpes zoster is another complication of VZV infection typically seen in immunocompromised hosts. We describe a patient with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who presented simultaneously with RHS and disseminated herpes zoster. While other complications have been documented to coexist with RHS, to our knowledge, this is the first reported case in the literature of concurrent RHS with disseminated herpes zoster...
2016: IDCases
Michael H Berger, Si Chen, Charif Sidani, Ramzi Younis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 14, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
Pengfei Liu, Wenxiang Zhong, Chenlong Liao, Min Yang, Wenchuan Zhang
Therapeutic strategy is controversial and not yet uniform for patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and persistent or recurrent facial pain after microvascular decompression, percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation (PRT), or Gamma Knife surgery. The outcomes and risks of PRT for these patients are not clearly understood. The authors performed a retrospective study of 84 patients with persistent or recurrent TN after surgery who then underwent PRT between 2007 and 2013. Data were obtained with chart review and telephone interviews...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Mohammad Waheed El-Anwar, Ahmed Shaker ElAassar
Introduction Several surgical techniques and modifications have been described to reduce the high recurrence rate after excision of preauricular sinus. Objectives The aim of this study is to review the literature regarding surgical approaches for preauricular sinus. Data Synthesis We performed searches in the LILACS, MEDLINE, SciELO, PubMed databases and Cochrane Library in September, 2015, and the key words used in the search were "preauricular sinus," "sinusectomy," "supra-auricular approach," "methylene blue," and/or "recurrence...
October 2016: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
A Arturo Leis, Dobrivoje S Stokic
Worldwide concern over Zika virus causing Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) soared after recent reports that Zika-related weakness was due to GBS. A global strategic response plan was initiated with recommendations for at-risk countries to prepare for GBS. This plan has major economic implications, as nations with limited resources struggle to implement costly immunotherapy. Since confirmation of causality is prerequisite to providing specific management recommendations, it is prudent to review data endorsing a GBS diagnosis...
2016: Frontiers in Neurology
Lisa E Ishii
Facial nerve paralysis, although uncommon in the pediatric population, occurs from several causes, including congenital deformities, infection, trauma, and neoplasms. Similar to the adult population, management of facial nerve disorders in children includes treatment for eye exposure, nasal obstruction/deviation, smile asymmetry, drooling, lack of labial function, and synkinesis. Free tissue transfer dynamic restoration is the preferred method for smile restoration in this population, with outcomes exceeding those of similar procedures in adults...
November 2016: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
Beatriz Parra, Jairo Lizarazo, Jorge A Jiménez-Arango, Andrés F Zea-Vera, Guillermo González-Manrique, José Vargas, Jorge A Angarita, Gonzalo Zuñiga, Reydmar Lopez-Gonzalez, Cindy L Beltran, Karen H Rizcala, Maria T Morales, Oscar Pacheco, Martha L Ospina, Anupama Kumar, David R Cornblath, Laura S Muñoz, Lyda Osorio, Paula Barreras, Carlos A Pardo
Background Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been linked to the Guillain-Barré syndrome. From November 2015 through March 2016, clusters of cases of the Guillain-Barré syndrome were observed during the outbreak of ZIKV infection in Colombia. We characterized the clinical features of cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome in the context of this ZIKV infection outbreak and investigated their relationship with ZIKV infection. Methods A total of 68 patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome at six Colombian hospitals were evaluated clinically, and virologic studies were completed for 42 of the patients...
October 5, 2016: New England Journal of Medicine
Keiko Tamaki, Jun Tsugawa, Takeshi Murakami, George Umemoto, Yoshio Tsuboi
A 59-year-old man developed a sudden onset of vertigo and nausea, and after a few hours, he could not swallow at all. On admission, neurological examination revealed severe dysphagia associated with other transient and mild neurological deficits, including left facial paresis, and hypesthesia in the right side of his body. MRI with diffusion weighted imaging showed a hyperintense signal lesion at the left rostral medial region of the medulla, prompting the diagnosis of an acute medial medullary infarction. His facial paresis and hypesthesia disappeared within 2 weeks...
October 2016: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
Rui Fan, Ruirui Ji, Wenxin Zou, Guoliang Wang, Hu Wang, Daniel James Penney, Jin Jun Luo, Yuxin Fan
Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is an autosomal dominant, multisystem channelopathy characterized by periodic paralysis, ventricular arrhythmias and distinctive dysmorphic facial or skeletal features. The disorder displays marked intrafamilial variability and incomplete penetrance. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder that demonstrates progressive fatigability, in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) at neuromuscular junctions is the primary autoantigen. The present study reports a rare case of a 31-year-old woman with a history of morbid obesity and periodic weakness, who presented with hemodynamic instability, cardiogenic shock and facial anomalies...
October 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Pinar Arican, Nihal Olgac Dundar, Pinar Gencpinar, Dilek Cavusoglu
Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute peripheral facial nerve paralysis, but the optimal dose of corticosteroids in pediatric patients is still unclear. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose corticosteroid therapy compared with high-dose corticosteroid therapy in children with Bell's palsy. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the dose of oral prednisolone regimen initiated. The severity of idiopathic facial nerve paralysis was graded according to the House-Brackmann Grading Scale...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Child Neurology
Samad Ghiasi, Mehdi Banaei
INTRODUCTION: Although bilateral facial nerve palsy is a rare condition, its etiology is more detectable than the unilateral type. A temporal bone fracture is one cause of bilateral facial nerve palsy, contributing in 3% of the cases. CASE PRESENTATION: Here, we report the case of a 35-year-old man complaining of bilateral incomplete eye closure, two weeks after a closed head injury caused by a motor vehicle accident. CONCLUSIONS: The high resolution computed tomography findings revealed a bilateral temporal bone fracture line, which extended to the fallopian canal...
June 2016: Archives of Trauma Research
Étienne Ojardias, Oscar Azeo, Diana Rimaud, Pascal Giraux
OBJECTIVE: Transcortical direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging technique in the rehabilitation of hemiplegic patients after stroke, and has been mainly evaluated for the upper limb. The feasibility and tolerance of the use of repeated stimulations on the lower limb motor cortex require a clinical evaluation. OBSERVATIONS: A 72-year-old patient, who suffered from a first ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery area, on July 2015, was admitted, 6 months post-stroke, to the PRM outpatient clinic of the university hospital of Saint-Étienne, for a motor training program combined with iterative tDCS stimulations...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
D P Butler, K S Johal, D H Harrison, A O Grobbelaar
Acquired bilateral facial palsy is rare and causes difficulty with speech and eating, but dynamic reanimation of the face can reduce the effect of these problems. Of 712 patients who had these procedures during our study period, two had an acquired bilateral facial paralysis. In both, reanimation was completed in a single operation using a free-functional transfer of the latissimus dorsi muscle that was coapted to the masseteric branch of the trigeminal nerve. Both patients achieved excellent non-spontaneous excursion and an improvement in function...
September 22, 2016: British Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
Shaheen Hasmat, Nigel H Lovell, Gregg J Suaning, Tsu-Hui Hubert Low, Jonathan Clark
The most devastating outcome of facial nerve paralysis is the inability to completely close the eye as it can lead to corneal ulceration and loss of vision. Gravity-assisted eye closure with upper lid loading is commonly used; however it is limited in replicating physiological eye closure to adequately lubricate the cornea. Superior results can be obtained using more advanced reconstructive approaches, however they depend on nerve regrowth which may be unpredictable and prolonged. This report describes a novel technique for creating an active eye closure using an implantable actuator...
September 7, 2016: Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery: JPRAS
Patrick Trévidic, Gisella Criollo-Lamilla
BACKGROUND: Platysma bands are one of the first signs of aging of the neck. Current theories suggest that these bands develop due to skin sagging followed by loss of muscle tone. Treatment strategies, therefore, aim to tighten skin and muscle. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that platysma bands are due to muscular activity during the aging process and not secondary to skin sagging. This suggests a new approach to managing platysma bands. METHODS: A descriptive, prospective clinical study of 25 patients who presented with definitive, unilateral, facial palsy following otoneurosurgical treatment...
September 10, 2016: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Nam-Gyu Ryu, Jin Kim
Unexpected iatrogenic facial nerve paralysis not only affects facial disfiguration, but also imposes a devastating effect on the social, psychological, and economic aspects of an affected person's life at once. The aims of this study were to postulate where surgeons had mistakenly drilled or where obscured by granulations or by fibrous bands and to look for surgical approach with focused on the safety of facial nerve in mastoid surgery. We had found 14 cases of iatrogenic facial nerve injury (IFNI) during mastoid surgery for 5 years in Korea...
September 2016: Journal of Audiology & Otology
Yousef Shafaiee, Bita Shahbazzadegan
INTRODUCTION: Facial paralysis is a devastating condition with profound functional, aesthetic and psychosocial consequences. Tumors within or outside the skull, Bell's palsy and trauma are the most common causes of facial paralysis in adults. CASE PRESENTATION: Our patient was a 35-year-old man with deep laceration wounds. The patient was taken to the operating room and the nerves were repaired. We observed gradual improvement of muscle performance except branches of the frontal nerve...
May 2016: Trauma Monthly
Ildikó Gagyor, Vishnu Madhok, Frank Sullivan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 12, 2016: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
Chong Han Pek, Crystal Shuk Jin Cheong, Yan Lin Yap, Stephen Doggett, Thiam Chye Lim, Wei Chen Ong, Jane Lim
BACKGROUND: Ticks are blood-sucking arachnids that feed on all classes of vertebrates, including humans. Ixodes holocyclus, also known as the Australian Paralysis Tick, is capable of causing a myriad of clinical issues in humans and companion animals, including the transmission of infectious agents, toxin-mediated paralysis, allergic and inflammatory reactions, and mammalian meat allergies in humans. The Australian Paralysis Tick is endemic to Australia, and only two other exported cases have been reported in the literature...
September 8, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
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