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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29792870/peripheral-complement-interactions-with-amyloid-%C3%AE-peptide-in-alzheimer-s-disease-polymorphisms-structure-and-function-of-complement-receptor-1
#1
Jenny U Johansson, William D Brubaker, Harold Javitz, Andrew W Bergen, Denise Nishita, Abhishek Trigunaite, Andrés Crane, Justine Ceballos, Diego Mastroeni, Andrea J Tenner, Marwan Sabbagh, Joseph Rogers
INTRODUCTION: Genome-wide association studies consistently show that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the complement receptor 1 (CR1) gene modestly but significantly alter Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. Follow-up research has assumed that CR1 is expressed in the human brain despite a paucity of evidence for its function there. Alternatively, erythrocytes contain >80% of the body's CR1, where, in primates, it is known to bind circulating pathogens. METHODS: Multidisciplinary methods were employed...
May 21, 2018: Alzheimer's & Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29792846/adenosine-receptor-distribution-in-rhesus-monkey-ocular-tissue
#2
Krista M Beach, Li-Fang Hung, Baskar Arumugam, Earl L Smith, Lisa A Ostrin
Adenosine receptor (ADOR) antagonists, such as 7-methylxanthine (7-MX), have been shown to slow myopia progression in humans and animal models. Adenosine receptors are found throughout the body, and regulate the release of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and glutamate. However, the role of adenosine in eye growth is unclear. Evidence suggests that 7-MX increases scleral collagen fibril diameter, hence preventing axial elongation. This study used immunohistochemistry (IHC) and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) to examine the distribution of the four ADORs in the normal monkey eye to help elucidate potential mechanisms of action...
May 21, 2018: Experimental Eye Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29792826/fast-evolving-human-specific-neural-enhancers-are-associated-with-aging-related-diseases
#3
Han Chen, Chunyan Li, Zhicheng Zhou, Han Liang
The antagonistic pleiotropy theory hypothesizes that evolutionary adaptations maximizing the fitness in early age increase disease burden after reproduction. This theory remains largely untested at the molecular level. Here, we analyzed enhancer evolution in primates to investigate the relationships between aging-related diseases and enhancers acquired after the human-chimpanzee divergence. We report a 5-fold increased evolutionary rate of enhancers that are activated in neural tissues, leading to fixation of ∼100 human-specific enhancers potentially under adaptation...
May 23, 2018: Cell Systems
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29792471/sex-differences-in-the-anorexigenic-effects-of-dexfenfluramine-and-amphetamine-in-baboons
#4
Richard W Foltin, Suzette M Evans
The anorexigenic effects of intramuscular d-amphetamine HCl (0.06-0.50 mg/kg) and dexfenfluramine HCl (0.25-2.0 mg/kg) were determined in experimentally naïve baboons. A group of 8 adult male baboons was tested prior to a group of 7 adult female baboons. A 120-min session occurred at 9:00 a.m. during which baboons could respond for food pellets. Drug was given 30 min prior to the 9:00 a.m. morning session. Beginning at 11:00 a.m., baboons had a 6-hr multiple-meal session during which they could have up to 4 food pellet meals...
May 24, 2018: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29790980/contrasting-patterns-of-genomic-diversity-reveal-accelerated-genetic-drift-but-reduced-directional-selection-on-x-chromosome-in-wild-and-domestic-sheep-species
#5
Ze-Hui Chen, Min Zhang, Feng-Hua Lv, Xue Ren, Wen-Rong Li, Ming-Jun Liu, Kiwoong Nam, Michael W Bruford, Meng-Hua Li
Analyses of genomic diversity along the X chromosome and of its correlation with autosomal diversity can facilitate understanding of evolutionary forces in shaping sex-linked genomic architecture. Strong selective sweeps and accelerated genetic drift on the X-chromosome have been inferred in primates and other model species, but no such insight has yet been gained in domestic animals compared with their wild relatives. Here, we analyzed X-chromosome variability in a large ovine data set, including a BeadChip array for 943 ewes from the world's sheep populations and 110 whole genomes of wild and domestic sheep...
April 1, 2018: Genome Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789793/modern-myoma-treatment-in-the-last-20-years-a-review-of-the-literature
#6
REVIEW
Ahmed El-Balat, Rudy Leon DeWilde, Iryna Schmeil, Morva Tahmasbi-Rad, Sandra Bogdanyova, Ali Fathi, Sven Becker
Myomas, also known as fibroids, are a specific characteristic of the human species. No other primates develop fibroids. At a cellular level, myomas are benign hyperplastic lesions of uterine smooth muscle cells. There are interesting theoretical concepts that link the development of myomas in humans with the highly specific process of childbirth from an upright position and the resulting need for greatly increased "expulsive" forces during labor. Myomas might be the price our species pays for our bipedal and highly intelligent existence...
2018: BioMed Research International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789605/neuromodulation-of-sensory-networks-in-monkey-brain-by-focused-ultrasound-with-mri-guidance-and-detection
#7
Pai-Feng Yang, M Anthony Phipps, Allen T Newton, Vandiver Chaplin, John C Gore, Charles F Caskey, Li Min Chen
Focused ultrasound (FUS) has gained recognition as a technique for non-invasive neuromodulation with high spatial precision and the ability to both excite and inhibit neural activity. Here we demonstrate that MRI-guided FUS is capable of exciting precise targets within areas 3a/3b in the monkey brain, causing downstream activations in off-target somatosensory and associated brain regions which are simultaneously detected by functional MRI. The similarity between natural tactile stimulation-and FUS- evoked fMRI activation patterns suggests that FUS likely can excite populations of neurons and produce associated spiking activities that may be subsequently transmitted to other functionally related touch regions...
May 22, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789530/efficient-blood-brain-barrier-opening-in-primates-with-neuronavigation-guided-ultrasound-and-real-time-acoustic-mapping
#8
Shih-Ying Wu, Christian Aurup, Carlos Sierra Sanchez, Julien Grondin, Wenlan Zheng, Hermes Kamimura, Vincent P Ferrera, Elisa E Konofagou
Brain diseases including neurological disorders and tumors remain under treated due to the challenge to access the brain, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricting drug delivery which, also profoundly limits the development of pharmacological treatment. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles is the sole method to open the BBB noninvasively, locally, and transiently and facilitate drug delivery, while translation to the clinic is challenging due to long procedure, targeting limitations, or invasiveness of current systems...
May 22, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789519/a-macaca-fascicularis-knee-osteoarthritis-model-developed-by-modified-hulth-combined-with-joint-scratches
#9
Xin Zhou, Lei Zhang, Xiaoguang Guo, Gang Liu, Guoyou Wang, Shijie Fu
BACKGROUND Osteoarthritis is a common degenerative disease of joints, and animal models have important significance in the investigation of this disease. The aim of this study was to develop a better method for developing osteoarthritis models in primates by comparing the modified Hulth score combined with joint scratches modeling method with others. MATERIAL AND METHODS We randomly divided 15 young male Macaca fascicularis and 3 old male Macaca fascicularis into 6 groups (n=3). Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) models were developed with different methods: modified Hulth combined with joint scratches (Group A), modified Hulth (Group B), Hulth (Group C), spontaneous models (Group D); sham-operated (Group E), and blank control (Group F)...
May 23, 2018: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789362/reply-to-forni-et-al-multiple-selected-changes-may-modulate-the-molecular-interaction-between-laverania-rh5-and-primate-basigin
#10
Lindsey J Plenderleith, Weimin Liu, Oscar A MacLean, Yingying Li, Dorothy E Loy, Sesh A Sundararaman, Frederic Bibollet-Ruche, Gerald H Learn, Beatrice H Hahn, Paul M Sharp
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 22, 2018: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789360/bat-caliciviruses-and-human-noroviruses-are-antigenically-similar-and-have-overlapping-histo-blood-group-antigen-binding-profiles
#11
Jacob F Kocher, Lisa C Lindesmith, Kari Debbink, Anne Beall, Michael L Mallory, Boyd L Yount, Rachel L Graham, Jeremy Huynh, J Edward Gates, Eric F Donaldson, Ralph S Baric
Emerging zoonotic viral diseases remain a challenge to global public health. Recent surveillance studies have implicated bats as potential reservoirs for a number of viral pathogens, including coronaviruses and Ebola viruses. Caliciviridae represent a major viral family contributing to emerging diseases in both human and animal populations and have been recently identified in bats. In this study, we blended metagenomics, phylogenetics, homology modeling, and in vitro assays to characterize two novel bat calicivirus (BtCalV) capsid sequences, corresponding to strain BtCalV/A10/USA/2009, identified in Perimyotis subflavus near Little Orleans, MD, and bat norovirus...
May 22, 2018: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29789322/a-missing-piece-the-spiny-mouse-and-the-puzzle-of-menstruating-species
#12
REVIEW
Nadia Bellofiore, Fiona Cousins, Peter Temple-Smith, Hayley Dickinson, Jemma Evans
We recently discovered the first known menstruating rodent. With the exception of four bats and the elephant shrew, the common spiny mouse ( Acomys cahirinus ) is the only species outside the primate order to exhibit menses. There are few widely accepted theories on why menstruation developed as the preferred reproductive strategy of these select mammals, all of which reference the evolution of spontaneous decidualisation prior to menstrual shedding. Though menstruating species share several reproductive traits, there has been no identifiable feature unique to menstruating species...
July 2018: Journal of Molecular Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29788292/biological-processes-modulating-longevity-across-primates-a-phylogenetic-genome-phenome-analysis
#13
Gerard Muntané, Xavier Farré, Juan Antonio Rodríguez, Cinta Pegueroles, David A Hughes, João Pedro de Magalhães, Toni Gabaldón, Arcadi Navarro
Aging is a complex process affecting different species and individuals in different ways. Comparing genetic variation across species with their aging phenotypes will help understanding the molecular basis of aging and longevity. Although most studies on aging have so far focused on short-lived model organisms, recent comparisons of genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic data across lineages with different lifespans are unveiling molecular signatures associated with longevity. Here, we examine the relationship between genomic variation and maximum lifespan (MLS) across primate species...
May 21, 2018: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787867/investigating-common-coding-of-observed-and-executed-actions-in-the-monkey-brain-using-cross-modal-multi-variate-fmri-classification
#14
Prosper Agbesi Fiave, Saloni Sharma, Jan Jastorff, Koen Nelissen
Mirror neurons are generally described as a neural substrate hosting shared representations of actions, by simulating or 'mirroring' the actions of others onto the observers' own motor system. Since single neuron recordings are rarely feasible in humans, it has been argued that cross-modal multi-variate pattern analysis (MVPA) of non-invasive fMRI data is a suitable technique to investigate common coding of observed and executed actions, allowing researchers to infer the presence of mirror neurons in the human brain...
May 19, 2018: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787745/modeling-transposable-element-dynamics-with-fragmentation-equations
#15
Mario Banuelos, Suzanne Sindi
Transposable elements (TEs), segments of DNA capable of self-replication, are abundant in the genomes of most organisms and thus serve as a record of past mutational events. While some work suggests TEs may serve a regulatory function for the host, most empirical and theoretical studies have shown that TEs often have deleterious effects on a host. Because they are not essential, the host genome consists of both full-length (actively replicating) and partial length (inactive remnant) copies of TEs. We developed a novel mathematical formulation of TE dynamics by modeling the density of full and partial length copies resulting from mutations (insertions and deletions) and TE replication within the host genome...
May 19, 2018: Mathematical Biosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787621/recent-evolution-of-the-human-skin-barrier
#16
REVIEW
Erin A Brettmann, Cristina de Guzman Strong
The skin is the first line of defense against the environment, with the epidermis as the outermost tissue providing much of the barrier function. Given its direct exposure to and encounters with the environment, the epidermis must evolve to provide an optimal barrier for the survival of an organism. Recent advances in genomics have identified a number of genes for the human skin barrier that have undergone evolutionary changes since humans diverged from chimpanzees. Here we highlight a selection of key and innovative genetic findings for skin barrier evolution in our divergence from our primate ancestors and among modern human populations...
May 22, 2018: Experimental Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787573/male-resource-defense-mating-system-in-primates-an-experimental-test-in-wild-capuchin-monkeys
#17
Barbara Tiddi, Michael Heistermann, Martin K Fahy, Brandon C Wheeler
Ecological models of mating systems provide a theoretical framework to predict the effect of the defendability of both breeding resources and mating partners on mating patterns. In resource-based mating systems, male control over breeding resources is tightly linked to female mating preference. To date, few field studies have experimentally investigated the relationship between male resource control and female mating preference in mammals due to difficulties in manipulating ecological factors (e.g., food contestability)...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29787425/a-metabolomic-serum-signature-from-nonhuman-primates-treated-with-a-radiation-countermeasure-gamma-tocotrienol-and-exposed-to-ionizing-radiation
#18
Evan L Pannkuk, Evagelia C Laiakis, Albert J Fornace, Oluseyi O Fatanmi, Vijay K Singh
The search for and development of radiation countermeasures to treat acute lethal radiation injury has been underway for the past six decades, resulting in the identification of multiple classes of radiation countermeasures. However, to date only granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Neupogen) and PEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (Neulasta) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. Gamma-tocotrienol has demonstrated radioprotective efficacy in murine and nonhuman primate models...
July 2018: Health Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29785844/regularity-extraction-across-species-associative-learning-mechanisms-shared-by-human-and-non-human-primates
#19
Arnaud Rey, Laure Minier, Raphaëlle Malassis, Louisa Bogaerts, Joël Fagot
Extracting the regularities of our environment is a core cognitive ability in human and non-human primates. Comparative studies may provide information of strong heuristic value to constrain the elaboration of computational models of regularity learning. This study illustrates this point by testing human and non-human primates (Guinea baboons, Papio papio) with the same experimental paradigm, using a novel online learning measure. For local co-occurrence regularities, we found similar patterns of regularity extraction in baboons and humans...
May 21, 2018: Topics in Cognitive Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29785638/intermittent-convection-enhanced-delivery-of-gdnf-into-rhesus-monkey-putamen-absence-of-local-or-cerebellar-toxicity
#20
Matthias Luz, Philip C Allen, John Bringas, Chris Boiko, Diane E Stockinger, Kristen J Nikula, Owen Lewis, Max Woolley, H Christian Fibiger, Krystof Bankiewicz, Erich Mohr
Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has demonstrated neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and nonhuman primate models of Parkinson's disease. However, continuous intraputamenal infusion of GDNF (100 µg/day) resulted in multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss in a 6-month toxicity study in rhesus monkeys. It was hypothesized that continuous leakage of GDNF into the cerebrospinal fluid compartment during the infusions led to down-regulation of GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF then mediated the observed cerebellar lesions...
May 22, 2018: Archives of Toxicology
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