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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431000/left-brain-asymmetry-of-the-planum-temporale-in-a-nonhominid-primate-redefining-the-origin-of-brain-specialization-for-language
#1
Damien Marie, Muriel Roth, Romain Lacoste, Bruno Nazarian, Alice Bertello, Jean-Luc Anton, William D Hopkins, Konstantina Margiotoudi, Scott A Love, Adrien Meguerditchian
The planum temporale (PT) is a critical region of the language functional network in the human brain showing a striking size asymmetry toward the left hemisphere. Historically considered as a structural landmark of the left-brain specialization for language, a similar anatomical bias has been described in great apes but never in monkeys-indicating that this brain landmark might be unique to Hominidae evolution. In the present in vivo magnetic resonance imaging study, we show clearly for the first time in a nonhominid primate species, an Old World monkey, a left size predominance of the PT among 96 olive baboons (Papio anubis), using manual delineation of this region in each individual hemisphere...
April 19, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430100/discovery-of-african-bat-polyomaviruses-and-infrequent-recombination-in-the-large-t-antigen-in-the-polyomaviridae
#2
Michael Carr, Gabriel Gonzalez, Michihito Sasaki, Kimihito Ito, Akihiro Ishii, Bernard M Hang'ombe, Aaron S Mweene, Yasuko Orba, Hirofumi Sawa
Bat species represent natural reservoirs for a number of high-consequence human pathogens. The present study investigated the diversity of polyomaviruses (PyVs) in Zambian insectivorous and fruit bat species. We describe the complete genomes from four newly proposed African bat PyV species employing the recently recommended criteria provided by the Polyomaviridae Study Group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. A comprehensive phylogenetic and recombination analysis was performed to determine genetic relationships and the distribution of recombination events in PyV from mammalian and avian species...
April 22, 2017: Journal of General Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430039/distractor-resistant-stm-is-supported-by-transient-changes-in-neural-stimulus-representations
#3
Jan Derrfuss, Matthias Ekman, Michael Hanke, Marc Tittgemeyer, Christian J Fiebach
Goal-directed behavior in a complex world requires the maintenance of goal-relevant information despite multiple sources of distraction. However, the brain mechanisms underlying distractor-resistant working or STM are not fully understood. Although early single-unit recordings in monkeys and fMRI studies in humans pointed to an involvement of lateral prefrontal cortices, more recent studies highlighted the importance of posterior cortices for the active maintenance of visual information also in the presence of distraction...
April 21, 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429751/preclinical-study-of-raav2-strail-pharmaceutical-efficacy-biodistribution-and-safety-in-animals
#4
Q Ru, W Li, X Wang, S Zhang, L Chen, Y Zhang, Y Ge, Y Zu, Y Liu, D Zheng
The recombinant sTRAIL has been in clinical trial for various human malignancies. However, the half-life time of sTRAIL is very short, which might be an important factor influencing its clinical efficacy for cancer therapy. We previously reported the recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-encoding sTRAIL95-281-mediated sTRAIL expression in vivo up to 8 months and suppressed tumor growth markedly in mouse xenografts. In the present study, we further evaluated the clinical potency for cancer gene therapy and the safety in mouse and non-human primates...
April 21, 2017: Cancer Gene Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428630/hinge-deleted-igg4-blocker-therapy-for-acetylcholine-receptor-myasthenia-gravis-in-rhesus-monkeys
#5
Mario Losen, Aran F Labrijn, Vivianne H van Kranen-Mastenbroek, Maarten L Janmaat, Krista G Haanstra, Frank J Beurskens, Tom Vink, Margreet Jonker, Bert A 't Hart, Marina Mané-Damas, Peter C Molenaar, Pilar Martinez-Martinez, Eline van der Esch, Janine Schuurman, Marc H de Baets, Paul W H I Parren
Autoantibodies against ion channels are the cause of numerous neurologic autoimmune disorders. Frequently, such pathogenic autoantibodies have a restricted epitope-specificity. In such cases, competing antibody formats devoid of pathogenic effector functions (blocker antibodies) have the potential to treat disease by displacing autoantibodies from their target. Here, we have used a model of the neuromuscular autoimmune disease myasthenia gravis in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) to test the therapeutic potential of a new blocker antibody: MG was induced by passive transfer of pathogenic acetylcholine receptor-specific monoclonal antibody IgG1-637...
April 20, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428078/kinetic-reconstruction-reveals-time-dependent-effects-of-romosozumab-on-bone-formation-and-osteoblast-function-in-vertebral-cancellous-and-cortical-bone-in-cynomolgus-monkeys
#6
Rogely Waite Boyce, Qing-Tian Niu, Michael S Ominsky
Romosozumab, a humanized monoclonal sclerostin antibody under development for the treatment of osteoporosis, has a unique mechanism of action on bone-increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption. The effects on bone formation are transient, eliciting a rapid increase in bone formation that attenuates with continued treatment. Although bone formation attenuates, bone mineral density (BMD) continues to increase. To explore potential tissue-level mechanisms that could contribute to a progressive increase in spine BMD, we used kinetic reconstruction techniques to examine the effects of romosozumab on modeling and remodeling units in vertebral cancellous bone from adult cynomolgus monkeys administered romosozumab for 10 and 28weeks...
April 18, 2017: Bone
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425496/3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-increases-affiliative-behaviors-in-squirrel-monkeys-in-a-serotonin-2a-receptor-dependent-manner
#7
Elizabeth G Pitts, Adelaide R Minerva, Erika B Oliver, Jordan N Kohn, Meghan T Logun, Agnieszka Sulima, Kenner C Rice, Leonard L Howell
3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) increases sociality in humans and animals. Release of serotonin (5-HT) is thought to play an important role in the increase in social behaviors, but the mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. Despite the advantages of nonhuman primate models, no studies have examined the mechanisms of the social effects of MDMA in nonhuman primates. The behavior and vocalizations of four group-housed squirrel monkeys were examined following administration of MDMA, its enantiomers, and methamphetamine...
April 20, 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424401/-the-map-of-auditory-function
#8
So Fujimoto, Yutaka Komura
Brodmann areas 41 and 42 are located in the superior temporal gyrus and regarded as auditory cortices. The fundamental function in audition is frequency analysis; however, the findings on tonotopy maps of the human auditory cortex were not unified until recently when they were compared to the findings on inputs and outputs of the monkey auditory cortex. The auditory cortex shows plasticity after conditioned learning and surgery of cochlear implant. It is also involved in speech perception, music appreciation, and auditory hallucination in schizophrenia through interactions with other brain areas, such as the thalamus, frontal cortex, and limbic systems...
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424398/-brodmann-areas-27-28-36-and-37-the-parahippocampal-and-the-fusiform-gyri
#9
Satoshi Eifuku
First, Brodmann areas 27, 28, 36 and 37, were anatomically defined in the beginning of this review. These areas exist in the parahippocampal or fusiform gyrus of the ventral temporal lobe in humans. Subsequently, the current understanding of their functions was summarized on the basis of recent findings mainly through human functional neuroimaging studies and animal studies. Rodent studies have shown the existence of neuronal activities for representing space, such as those involving head-direction cells or grid cells, in areas 27 (the parasubicular cortex) and 28 (the ventral entorhinal cortex)...
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424389/-brodmann-areas-8-and-9-including-the-frontal-eye-field
#10
Masataka Watanabe
Based on cytoarchitectonic analyses, Brodmann assigned numbers 8 and 9 to certain areas of the dorsal and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) in humans and monkeys. Petrides and Pandya re-analyzed the cytoarchitectures of the human and monkey PFCs, and proposed slightly different brain maps for both species. They assigned numbers 8, 9 and 9/46 to the areas that were originally named areas 8 and 9. Areas 8 and 9 have both lateral and medial regions respectively. The lateral area 8 is important for conditional discrimination learning...
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424388/-interface-between-brain-and-outside
#11
Masato Taira
Areas 5 and 7 are the association cortices which are located in the parietal lobe and process somatosensory and visual information, respectively. The location of area 7 differ in the Brodmann's human and monkey brain map, in the human brain map area 7 is located in the superior parietal lobe, while it is in the inferior parietal lobe in the monkey brain map. Thus, it is difficult to discuss the function of these areas.
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424386/-touch-brodmann-areas-3-1-and-2
#12
Yoshiaki Iwamura
A brief history of cytoarchitectonic studies of Brodmann areas 3, 1, and 2 is presented here. Results of neurophysiological studies, i.e., recordings of single neuronal activities in these three cytoarchitectonic areas of the monkey brain are described and interpreted on the basis of a hierarchial schema model of information processing. Finally, recent studies on the human postcentral gyrus are reviewed and compared with the results of the aforementioned monkey studies.
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424293/prediction-suppression-and-surprise-enhancement-in-monkey-inferotemporal-cortex
#13
Suchitra Ramachandran, Travis Meyer, Carl R Olson
Exposing monkeys, over the course of days and weeks, to pairs of images presented in fixed sequence, so that each leading image becomes a predictor for the corresponding trailing image, affects neuronal visual responsiveness in area TE. At the end of the training period, neurons respond relatively weakly to a trailing image when it appears in a trained sequence and thus confirms prediction whereas they respond relatively strongly to the same image when it appears in an untrained sequence and thus violates prediction...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424031/yellow-fever-from-angola-and-congo-a-storm-gathers
#14
Qanta A Ahmed, Ziad A Memish
In common with Zika, Chikungunya and Dengue, Yellow Fever (YF) is an arthropod-borne flavivirus. It is transmitted between humans and from monkeys by mosquitoes of the Aedes aegypti (its principal vector), haemogogus and albopictus varieties. Three cycles of transmission may occur: urban; sylvatic; and intermediate. Recently, sub-Saharan Africa has seen the resurgence of this neglected disease. The current YF outbreak in Angola began in December 2015 in the capital Luanda and by October 2016 there had been > 4300 suspected cases, with 376 deaths (case fatality rate = 8...
April 2017: Tropical Doctor
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421552/gap-junction-modulation-of-low-frequency-oscillations-in-the-cerebellar-granule-cell-layer
#15
Jennifer Claire Robinson, C Andrew Chapman, Richard Courtemanche
Local field potential (LFP) oscillations in the granule cell layer (GCL) of the cerebellar cortex have been identified previously in the awake rat and monkey during immobility. These low-frequency oscillations are thought to be generated through local circuit interactions between Golgi cells and granule cells within the GCL. Golgi cells display rhythmic firing and pacemaking properties, and also are electrically coupled through gap junctions within the GCL. Here, we tested if gap junctions in the rat cerebellar cortex contribute to the generation of LFP oscillations in the GCL...
April 18, 2017: Cerebellum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421387/pharmacokinetics-of-monoclonal-antibodies-and-fc-fusion-proteins
#16
REVIEW
Liming Liu
There are many factors that can influence the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a mAb or Fc-fusion molecule with the primary determinant being FcRn-mediated recycling. Through Fab or Fc engineering, IgG-FcRn interaction can be used to generate a variety of therapeutic antibodies with significantly enhanced half-life or ability to remove unwanted antigen from circulation. Glycosylation of a mAb or Fc-fusion protein can have a significant impact on the PK of these molecules. mAb charge can be important and variants with pI values of 1-2 unit difference are likely to impact PK with lower pI values being favorable for a longer half-life...
April 19, 2017: Protein & Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421292/phylogenetic-insight-into-zika-and-emerging-viruses-for-a-perspective-on-potential-hosts
#17
Diana S Weber, Karen A Alroy, Samuel M Scheiner
Global viral diversity is substantial, but viruses that contribute little to the public health burden or to agricultural damage receive minimal attention until a seemingly unimportant virus becomes a threat. The Zika virus (ZIKV) illustrated this, as there was limited information and awareness of the virus when it was identified as a public health emergency in February 2016. Predicting which virus may pose a future threat is difficult. This is in part because significant knowledge gaps in the basic biology and ecology of an emerging virus can impede policy development, delay decision making, and hinder public health action...
April 18, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419739/cardiac-troponin-t-and-fast-skeletal-muscle-denervation-in-ageing
#18
Zherong Xu, Xin Feng, Juan Dong, Zhong-Min Wang, Jingyun Lee, Cristina Furdui, Daniel Clark Files, Kristen M Beavers, Stephen Kritchevsky, Carolanne Milligan, Jian-Ping Jin, Osvaldo Delbono, Tan Zhang
BACKGROUND: Ageing skeletal muscle undergoes chronic denervation, and the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the key structure that connects motor neuron nerves with muscle cells, shows increased defects with ageing. Previous studies in various species have shown that with ageing, type II fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres show more atrophy and NMJ deterioration than type I slow-twitch fibres. However, how this process is regulated is largely unknown. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle fibre-type specific denervation at the NMJ could be critical to identifying novel treatments for sarcopenia...
April 16, 2017: Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419279/primates-lice-and-bacteria-speciation-and-genome-evolution-in-the-symbionts-of-hominid-lice
#19
Bret M Boyd, Julie M Allen, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Pranjal Vachaspati, Zach Quicksall, Tandy Warnow, Lawrence Mugisha, Kevin P Johnson, David L Reed
Insects with restricted diets rely on symbiotic bacteria to provide essential metabolites missing in their diet. The blood-sucking lice are obligate, host-specific parasites of mammals and are themselves host to symbiotic bacteria. In human lice, these bacterial symbionts supply the lice with B-vitamins. Here we sequenced the genomes of symbiotic and heritable bacterial of human, chimpanzee, gorilla, and monkey lice and used phylogenomics to investigate their evolutionary relationships. We find that these symbionts have a phylogenetic history reflecting the louse phylogeny, a finding contrary to previous reports of symbiont replacement...
April 14, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419201/functional-imaging-of-audio-visual-selective-attention-in-monkeys-and-humans-how-do-lapses-in-monkey-performance-affect-cross-species-correspondences
#20
Teemu Rinne, Ross S Muers, Emma Salo, Heather Slater, Christopher I Petkov
The cross-species correspondences and differences in how attention modulates brain responses in humans and animal models are poorly understood. We trained 2 monkeys to perform an audio-visual selective attention task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), rewarding them to attend to stimuli in one modality while ignoring those in the other. Monkey fMRI identified regions strongly modulated by auditory or visual attention. Surprisingly, auditory attention-related modulations were much more restricted in monkeys than humans performing the same tasks during fMRI...
April 13, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
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