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Cognitive errors

Atsuko Koyama, Yoichi Ohtake, Kanae Yasuda, Kiyohiro Sakai, Ryo Sakamoto, Hiromichi Matsuoka, Hirokuni Okumi, Toshiko Yasuda
Background: Non-organic lesions or diseases of unknown origin are sometimes misdiagnosed as "psychogenic" disorders or "psychosomatic" diseases. For the quality of life and safety of patients, recent attention has focused on diagnostic error. The aim of this study was to clarify the factors that affected misdiagnoses in psychosomatic medicine by examining typical cases and to explore strategies that reduce diagnostic errors. Case presentation: The study period was from January 2001 to August 2017...
2018: BioPsychoSocial Medicine
Annalisa Colonna, Anna B Smith, Stuart Smith, Kirandeep VanDenEshof, Jane Orgill, Paul Gringras, Deb K Pal
Background: Consolidation of learning occurs during sleep but when it is disturbed there may be an adverse impact upon these functions. While research has focused upon how sleep affects cognition in adulthood, the effects of disrupted sleep are likely to impact more heavily on learning among children and adolescents. We aimed to investigate whether a night's sleep impacts upon executive function compared with an equivalent wakefulness period. We also wanted to know whether restricting sleep would reduce these effects on performance...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Shigeki Hirano, Hitoshi Shinotoh, Hitoshi Shimada, Tsuneyoshi Ota, Koichi Sato, Noriko Tanaka, Ming-Rong Zhang, Makoto Higuchi, Kiyoshi Fukushi, Toshiaki Irie, Satoshi Kuwabara, Tetsuya Suhara
BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by chronic progressive cognitive decline and displays underlying brain cholinergic dysfunction, providing a rationale for treatment with cholinomimetic medication. The clinical presentations and courses of AD patients may differ by age of onset. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the present study was to illustrate the regional differences of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as quantified by N-[11C]methylpiperidinyl-4-acetate ([11C]MP4A) and PET using parametric whole brain analysis and clarify those differences as a function of age...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Iris Bomilcar, Robin G Morris, Richard G Brown, Daniel C Mograbi
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Lack of awareness about impairments is commonly found in Alzheimer disease (AD), but recent evidence suggests that patients may respond to the experience of illness despite limited awareness. In this study, we explored whether implicit emotional responses to experiences of failure in cognitive tasks would result in longer-term change in behavior. METHODS: Twenty-two patients with AD were seen 1 week after a previous session in which they performed computer tasks that had been manipulated to be either too difficult (failure condition) or very easy (success condition) for them...
March 2018: Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology: Official Journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology
Ena Xiao, Qiang Chen, Aaron L Goldman, Hao Yang Tan, Kaitlin Healy, Brad Zoltick, Saumitra Das, Bhaskar Kolachana, Joseph H Callicott, Dwight Dickinson, Karen F Berman, Daniel R Weinberger, Venkata S Mattay
BACKGROUND: We explored the cumulative effect of several late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) risk loci using a polygenic risk profile score (RPS) approach on measures of hippocampal function, cognition, and brain morphometry. METHODS: In a sample of 231 healthy control subjects (19-55 years of age), we used an RPS to study the effect of several LOAD risk loci reported in a recent meta-analysis on hippocampal function (determined by its engagement with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging during episodic memory) and several cognitive metrics...
November 2017: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
Annet Bluschke, Krutika Gohil, Maxi Petzold, Veit Roessner, Christian Beste
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a disorder affecting cognitive control. These functions are important to achieve goals when different actions need to be executed in close succession. This type of multi-component behavior, which often further requires the processing of information from different modalities, is important for everyday activities. Yet, possible changes in neurophysiological mechanisms have not been investigated in adolescent ADHD. We examined N = 31 adolescent ADHD patients and N = 35 healthy controls (HC) in two Stop-Change experiments using either uni-modal or bi-modal stimuli to trigger stop and change processes...
2018: NeuroImage: Clinical
Merylin Monaro, Luciano Gamberini, Francesca Zecchinato, Giuseppe Sartori
The use of faked identities is a current issue for both physical and online security. In this paper, we test the differences between subjects who report their true identity and the ones who give fake identity responding to control, simple, and complex questions. Asking complex questions is a new procedure for increasing liars' cognitive load, which is presented in this paper for the first time. The experiment consisted in an identity verification task, during which response time and errors were collected. Twenty participants were instructed to lie about their identity, whereas the other 20 were asked to respond truthfully...
2018: Frontiers in Psychology
Karuna Subramaniam, Hardik Kothare, Danielle Mizuiri, Srikantan S Nagarajan, John F Houde
Self-agency is the experience of being the agent of one's own thoughts and motor actions. The intact experience of self-agency is necessary for successful interactions with the outside world (i.e., reality monitoring) and for responding to sensory feedback of our motor actions (e.g., speech feedback control). Reality monitoring is the ability to distinguish internally self-generated information from outside reality (externally-derived information). In the present study, we examined the relationship of self-agency between lower-level speech feedback monitoring (i...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Jakub Antczak, Katarzyna Kowalska, Aleksandra Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Barbara Wach, Katarzyna Kasprzyk, Marta Banach, Karolina Rzeźnicka-Brzegowy, Jadwiga Kubica, Agnieszka Słowik
Background: Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is one of the most frequent dementia types in patients under 65 years of age. Currently, no therapy can effectively improve the cognitive deficits associated with FTD. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive method of inducing brain plasticity with therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of rTMS on cognitive, behavioral, and emotional function in FTD...
2018: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Tatsunori Watanabe, Kotaro Saito, Kazuto Ishida, Shigeo Tanabe, Mitsuya Horiba, Shogo Itamoto, Yoshino Ueki, Ikuo Wada, Ippei Nojima
Start hesitation in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) occurs predominantly during distractive and conflictual situations. The aim of this study was to investigate how differently an auditory stimulus (AS) influences execution function and execution time during a cognitively demanding stepping task in PD patients as compared to healthy controls. PD patients and healthy controls stepped forward in response to a visual imperative stimulus of an arrow. We applied a Simon task that comprised congruent and incongruent conditions...
March 17, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
He Zhou, Hyoki Lee, Jessica Lee, Michael Schwenk, Bijan Najafi
Practical tools which can be quickly administered are needed for measuring subtle changes in cognitive-motor performance over time. Frailty together with cognitive impairment, or 'cognitive frailty', are shown to be strong and independent predictors of cognitive decline over time. We have developed an interactive instrumented trail-making task (iTMT) platform, which allows quantification of motor planning error (MPE) through a series of ankle reaching tasks. In this study, we examined the accuracy of MPE in identifying cognitive frailty in older adults...
March 20, 2018: Sensors
Ane Storch Jakobsen, Helene Speyer, Hans Christian Brix Nørgaard, Mette Karlsen, Carsten Hjorthøj, Jesper Krogh, Ole Mors, Merete Nordentoft, Ulla Toft
OBJECTIVES: People with severe mental disorders die 10-25years earlier than people in the Western background population, mainly due to lifestyle related diseases, with cardiovascular disease (CVD) being the most frequent cause of death. Major contributors to this excess morbidity and mortality are unhealthy lifestyle factors including tobacco smoking, unhealthy eating habits and lower levels of physical activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the dietary habits and levels of physical activity in people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and overweight and to compare the results with the current recommendations and with results from the general Danish population...
March 16, 2018: Schizophrenia Research
Sonya Kim, Joseph F Rath, Vance Zemon, Marie M Cavallo, Rollin McCraty, Ana Sostre, Frederick W Foley
OBJECTIVE: To examine how positive affect influences ability to benefit from heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback treatment for individuals with severe brain injury. METHOD: Secondary data analysis of a nonrandomized experimental study that assessed the efficacy of biofeedback treatment for executive dysfunction in 13 individuals with chronic severe brain injury. RESULTS: Bivariate correlations between the predictors (levels of HRV and positive affect) and the outcome (change in Category Test errors) showed large effect sizes for higher levels of HRV coherence (r = -...
February 2018: Rehabilitation Psychology
Grant M Walker, Gregory Hickok, Julius Fridriksson
Picture naming impairments are a typical feature of stroke-induced aphasia. Overall accuracy and rates of different error types are used to make inferences about the severity and nature of damage to the brain's language network. Currently available assessment tools for picture naming accuracy treat it as a unidimensional measure, while assessment tools for error types treat items homogenously, contrary to findings from psycholinguistic investigations of word production. We created and tested a new cognitive psychometric model for assessment of picture naming responses, using cognitive theory to specify latent processing decisions during the production of a naming attempt, and using item response theory to separate the effects of item difficulty and participant ability on these internal processing decisions...
March 19, 2018: Psychological Assessment
Harmen B Gudde, Debra Griffiths, Kenny R Coventry
The memory game paradigm is a behavioral procedure to explore the relationship between language, spatial memory, and object knowledge. Using two different versions of the paradigm, spatial language use and memory for object location are tested under different, experimentally manipulated conditions. This allows us to tease apart proposed models explaining the influence of object knowledge on spatial language (e.g., spatial demonstratives), and spatial memory, as well as understanding the parameters that affect demonstrative choice and spatial memory more broadly...
February 19, 2018: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Craig G J Newman, Adam D Bevins, John P Zajicek, John R Hodges, Emil Vuillermoz, Jennifer M Dickenson, Denise S Kelly, Simona Brown, Rupert F Noad
Introduction: Ensuring reliable administration and reporting of cognitive screening tests are fundamental in establishing good clinical practice and research. This study captured the rate and type of errors in clinical practice, using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-III (ACE-III), and then the reduction in error rate using a computerized alternative, the ACEmobile app. Methods: In study 1, we evaluated ACE-III assessments completed in National Health Service (NHS) clinics ( n  = 87) for administrator error...
2018: Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring
Matthias Stangl, Johannes Achtzehn, Karin Huber, Caroline Dietrich, Claus Tempelmann, Thomas Wolbers
A progressive loss of navigational abilities in old age has been observed in numerous studies, but we have only limited understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying this decline [1]. A central component of the brain's navigation circuit are grid cells in entorhinal cortex [2], largely thought to support intrinsic self-motion-related computations, such as path integration (i.e., keeping track of one's position by integrating self-motion cues) [3-6]. Given that entorhinal cortex is particularly vulnerable to neurodegenerative processes during aging and Alzheimer's disease [7-14], deficits in grid cell function could be a key mechanism to explain age-related navigational decline...
March 12, 2018: Current Biology: CB
Emily B H Treichler, William D Spaulding
Despite the strengths of routine outcome monitoring (ROM) in community mental health settings, there are a number of barriers to effective implementation of ROM, including measurement error due to provider factors (e.g., training level) and non-target client factors (i.e., client characteristics which have no meaningful relationship to the outcome of interest). In this study, ROM data from 80 client-provider dyads were examined for sources of variance due to provider factors and non-target client factors. Results indicated that provider factors and non-target client factors accounted for between 9...
March 17, 2018: Administration and Policy in Mental Health
K A Honn, J M Hinson, P Whitney, H P A Van Dongen
In around-the-clock operations, reduced alertness due to circadian misalignment and sleep loss causes performance impairment, which can lead to catastrophic errors and accidents. There is mounting evidence that performance on different tasks is differentially affected, but the general principles underlying this differentiation are not well understood. One factor that may be particularly relevant is the degree to which tasks require executive control, that is, control over the initiation, monitoring, and termination of actions in order to achieve goals...
March 14, 2018: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Megan Zirnstein, Janet G van Hell, Judith F Kroll
In this study, we examined the role that cognitive control and language regulation ability play in mediating readers' susceptibility to prediction error costs when reading in the native language (L1) or a second language (L2). Twenty-four English monolinguals (Experiment 1) and 28 Chinese-English bilinguals (Experiment 2) read sentences in English while their EEG was recorded. The sentences varied in the predictability of an upcoming expected word and in whether that prediction was confirmed. Monolinguals showed sensitivity to sentence contexts in which expectations were not met (i...
March 14, 2018: Cognition
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