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C H Wong, T R Tan, H Y Heng Hy, T Ramesh, P W Ting, W S Lee, C L Teng, N Sivalingam, K K Tan
INTRODUCTION: Open disclosure is poorly understood in Malaysia but is an ethical and professional responsibility. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the perception of parents regarding the severity of medical error in relation to medication use or diagnosis; (2) the preference of parents for information following the medical error and its relation to severity; and (3) the preference of parents with regards to disciplinary action, reporting, and legal action. METHODS: We translated and contextualised a questionnaire developed from a previous study...
August 2016: Medical Journal of Malaysia
Julie Ma, Andrew Grogan-Kaylor, Jorge Delva
Research that simultaneously examines the relationship of multiple types of family and community violence with youth outcomes is limited in the previous research literature, particularly in Latin America. This study examined the relationship of youth exposure to family and community violence-parental use of corporal punishment, violence in the community, intimate partner physical aggression-with eight subscales of the Youth Self Report among a Chilean sample of 593 youth-mother pairs. Results from multilevel models indicated a positive association between youth exposure to violence in the family and community, and a wide range of behavior problem outcomes, in particular, aggression...
July 2016: Family Relations
Hideyuki Matsumoto, Ju Tian, Naoshige Uchida, Mitsuko Watabe-Uchida
Dopamine is thought to regulate learning from appetitive and aversive events. Here we examined how optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area of mice respond to aversive events in different conditions. In low reward contexts, most dopamine neurons were exclusively inhibited by aversive events, and expectation reduced dopamine neurons' responses to reward and punishment. When a single odor predicted both reward and punishment, dopamine neurons' responses to that odor reflected the integrated value of both outcomes...
October 19, 2016: ELife
Jian Hao, Yue Yang, Zhiwen Wang
Young adolescents are generally considered to be self-absorbed. Studies indicate that they lack relevant general cognitive abilities, such as impulse control, that mature in early adulthood. However, their idealism may cause them to be more intolerant of unfair treatment to others and thus result in their engaging in more altruistic behavior. The present study aimed to clarify whether young adolescents are more altruistic than adults and thus indicate whether altruistic competence is domain-specific. One hundred 22 young adolescents and adults participated in a face-to-face, two-round, third-party punishment experiment...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Sven Fischer, Kristoffel Grechenig, Nicolas Meier
We run several experiments which allow us to compare cooperation under perfect and imperfect information in a centralized and decentralized punishment regime. Under perfect and extremely noisy information, aggregate behavior does not differ between institutions. Under intermediate noise, punishment escalates in the decentralized peer-to-peer punishment regime which badly affects efficiency while sustaining cooperation for longer. Only decentralized punishment is often directed at cooperators (perverse punishment)...
2016: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
Zeynep Sofuoğlu, Görkem Sarıyer, M Gökalp Ataman
BACKGROUND AND AIM: Child maltreatment, i.e. abuse and neglect, is a significant problem worldwide and can cause impaired physical and mental health throughout life. The true extent still remains unknown in all countries, including Turkey. The aim of this study was to apply the two versions of the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) Child Abuse Screening Tool of ICAST-C and ICAST-P, which are used to assess child and parent feedback and to compare reports given by children and those given by parents...
September 2016: Central European Journal of Public Health
Phoebe E Bailey, Katherine Petridis, Skye N McLennan, Ted Ruffman, Peter G Rendell
OBJECTIVES: This study assesses age-related differences in the weighting and integration of appearance and behavior cues to trustworthiness. The aim is to assess whether it becomes more difficult with age to detect a cheater in disguise. METHOD: Young and older adults invested real money in a repeated trust game with trustees who varied on facial expression (smiling, neutral, angry) and return rate (high, low). Trustees were also rated for trustworthiness pre- and post-trust game...
October 14, 2016: Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Wei Cheng, Edmund T Rolls, Jiang Qiu, Wei Liu, Yanqing Tang, Chu-Chung Huang, XinFa Wang, Jie Zhang, Wei Lin, Lirong Zheng, JunCai Pu, Shih-Jen Tsai, Albert C Yang, Ching-Po Lin, Fei Wang, Peng Xie, Jianfeng Feng
The first brain-wide voxel-level resting state functional connectivity neuroimaging analysis of depression is reported, with 421 patients with major depressive disorder and 488 control subjects. Resting state functional connectivity between different voxels reflects correlations of activity between those voxels and is a fundamental tool in helping to understand the brain regions with altered connectivity and function in depression. One major circuit with altered functional connectivity involved the medial orbitofrontal cortex Brodmann area 13, which is implicated in reward, and which had reduced functional connectivity in depression with memory systems in the parahippocampal gyrus and medial temporal lobe, especially involving the perirhinal cortex Brodmann area 36 and entorhinal cortex Brodmann area 28...
October 14, 2016: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
Kim Ashburn, Brad Kerner, Dickens Ojamuge, Rebecka Lundgren
Violence against women and violence against children in Uganda are recognized as significant public health concerns. Exposure to violence at home as a child can increase the likelihood of perpetrating or experiencing violence later in life. These two forms of violence share similar risk factors and often, but not always, co-occur at the household level. Parenting programs have shown promise in reducing physical child punishment. Targeting men has also been proven effective in transforming attitudes related to gender roles and expectations and intimate partner violence (IPV) against women...
October 13, 2016: Prevention Science: the Official Journal of the Society for Prevention Research
Kjersti S Gulliksen, Ragnfrid H S Nordbø, Ester M S Espeset, Finn Skårderud, Arne Holte
INTRODUCTION: Studies show that patients' perception of their illness has a direct influence both on their utilization of health services and their adherence to treatment plans. This may be particularly relevant to the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa (AN). Previous studies on AN have typically explored single psycho-social factors that patients with AN relate to the emergence of their illness. There is a need for more coherent systematic descriptions of the complexity of the patients' narratives about how their illness emerged...
October 11, 2016: Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy
Jiawei Zhou, Jiarun Yang, Yunmiao Yu, Lin Wang, Dong Han, Xiongzhao Zhu, Jincai He, Xiaohui Qiu, Xiuxian Yang, Zhengxue Qiao, Hong Sui, Yanjie Yang
With the frequent occurrence of campus violence, scholars have devoted increasing attention to college students' aggression. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of aggression in Chinese university students and identify factors that could influence their aggression. We can thus find methods to reduce the incidence of college students' aggression in the future. A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was used to select university students (N = 4565) aged 16-25 years in Harbin. The Aggression Questionnaire, the Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Checklist and the Social Support Revalued Scale were used to collect data...
October 10, 2016: Psychology, Health & Medicine
Stuart F White, Patrick Tyler, Mary L Botkin, Anna K Erway, Laura C Thornton, Venkata Kolli, Kayla Pope, Harma Meffert, R James Blair
Individuals with substance abuse (SA) histories show impairment in the computations necessary for decision-making, including expected value (EV) and prediction error (PE). Neuroimaging findings, however, have been inconsistent. Sixteen youth with (SApositive) and 29 youth without (SAnegative) substance abuse histories completed a passive avoidance task while undergoing functional MRI. The groups did not significantly differ on age, gender composition or IQ. Behavioral results indicated that SApositive youth showed significantly less learning than SAnegative youth over the task...
September 21, 2016: Psychiatry Research
Valentino Antonio Pironti, Meng-Chuan Lai, Ulrich Müller, Edward Thomas Bullmore, Barbara Jacquelyn Sahakian
BACKGROUND: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) shows clear, albeit heterogeneous, cognitive dysfunctions. However, personality traits are not well understood in adults with ADHD, and it is unclear whether they are predisposing factors or phenotypical facets of the condition. AIMS: To assess whether personality traits of impulsivity, sensation seeking and sensitivity to punishment and reward are predisposing factors for ADHD or aspects of the clinical phenotype...
July 2016: BJPsych Open
Helge Schlüns, Helena Welling, Julian René Federici, Lars Lewejohann
Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prone to judge an ambiguous stimulus negatively if they had been agitated through shaking which simulates a predator attack. Such a cognitive bias has been suggested to reflect an internal emotional state analogous to humans who judge more pessimistically when they do not feel well. In order to test cognitive bias experimentally, an animal is conditioned to respond to two different stimuli, where one is punished while the other is rewarded. Subsequently a third, ambiguous stimulus is presented and it is measured whether the subject responds as if it expects a reward or a punishment...
October 3, 2016: Animal Cognition
Karen Morris, Diane L Cox, Kath Ward
This paper focuses on the occupational experiences of five men living within a forensic mental health unit over a year. This study used a descriptive qualitative case study methodology to explore the meaning and value placed on daily life (activities, occupations and routines), and how this changed over time. The men's stories showed a complex picture of their experiences of daily life. This study demonstrated the impact of the environment on the men and the ongoing challenge of the need to balance treatment/therapy with security demands and opportunities...
September 2, 2016: Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology
Essam Mohammed Janahi, Sakina Mustafa, Sajeda Alsari, Mariam Al-Mannai, Ghada N Farhat
INTRODUCTION: HIV/AIDS is one of the major health problems worldwide. Despite the low prevalence of HIV in Bahrain, educational and awareness programs remain highly important in controlling and preventing the spread of the disease. This study aimed to assess the public's knowledge, risk perceptions, and attitudes towards HIV/AIDS in Bahrain. METHODOLOGY: A self-administered questionnaire-based survey was administered to and completed by 1,038 Bahraini adults. RESULTS: Although the average general awareness among participants was good (63%), some misconceptions and erroneous beliefs were common, including knowledge of mode of transmission and high risk groups...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Infection in Developing Countries
Takahiro Osumi, Hideki Ohira
Previous studies have investigated which biological markers predict the decision to reject unfair monetary offers, termed costly punishment, in the ultimatum game (UG). One study showed that a phasic deceleratory response in heart rate (HR) is evoked in the responder more readily by offers that will be rejected than by offers that will be accepted. However, owing to the paucity of supporting evidence, it remains unclear whether and why HR deceleration can predict the decisions of UG responders. In this paper, we report two separate studies (Study 1 and Study 2) using modified versions of the UG to explore factors modulating HR deceleration...
September 28, 2016: International Journal of Psychophysiology
Suvi Saukkonen, Eeva T Aronen, Taina Laajasalo, Venla Salmi, Janne Kivivuori, Markus Jokela
We examined different forms of victimization experiences in relation to psychopathic features and whether these associations differed in boys and girls among 4855 Finnish school adolescents aged 15-16 years. Psychopathic features were measured with the Antisocial Process Screening Device- Self Report (APSD-SR). Victimization was assessed with questions about violent and abusive experiences across lifetime and within the last 12 months. Results from linear regression analysis showed that victimization was significantly associated with higher APSD-SR total scores, more strongly in girls than boys...
October 2016: Child Abuse & Neglect
Patrizia d'Ettorre, Claudio Carere, Lara Demora, Pauline Le Quinquis, Lisa Signorotti, Dalila Bovet
Emotional state may influence cognitive processes such as attention and decision-making. A cognitive judgement bias is the propensity to anticipate either positive or negative consequences in response to ambiguous information. Recent work, mainly on vertebrates, showed that the response to ambiguous stimuli might change depending on an individual's affective state, which is influenced by e.g. the social and physical environment. However, the response to ambiguous stimuli could also be affected by the individual's behavioural type (personality), a question that has been under-investigated...
September 27, 2016: Behavioural Processes
Aranzazu Duque, Concepción Vinader-Caerols, Santiago Monleón
We have previously observed impairing effects of social defeat stress (CSDS) on inhibitory avoidance (IA) in mice. Given the similarity between changes produced by social stress in animals and symptoms of certain human psychopathologies such as depression and anxiety, the effects of the antidepressant clomipramine on IA impairment produced by CSDS were evaluated in the present study. Male CD1 mice were randomly assigned to the groups: non-stressed+saline, non-stressed+clomipramine, stressed+saline and stressed+clomipramine...
2016: Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis
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